Buying From Afar / Shipping Goats

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by redsticker, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. redsticker

    redsticker Member

    113
    May 7, 2009
    SE Louisiana
    So, we haven't closed on the farm yet (next week, hopefully) but that hasn't stopped me from continuing my goat research and doing a little window shopping.

    I'm in love with some does that are out of state, way way way out of state. They're full grown, already shown, already kidded at least once. But they're so far away, I couldn't possibly check them out in person. What kinds of questions should I ask of a breeder who is out of state? If they are a "big name farm" I can trust their reputation, right?

    Has anyone ever shipped adult Nigerian Dwarf goats before? I'm guessing it would be more expensive than the kids, but probably cheaper than if I drove all the way up north to pick them up, which would take longer and have a heavier toll on the goats, right? Louisiana to New England... not happening. ;) What does shipping entail from the shipper and from me?

    But that does bring me to my next question. Should I be concerned about moving a goat from up north to Louisiana? The climate is different, the heat, humidity, etc. so will I have to worry about how they adjust?

    What can I do to help goats recover from the stress of the trip and adjust to their new surroundings?

    I'd love to hear any advice or stories from people who've done this before.
     
  2. ksacres

    ksacres New Member

    161
    Oct 30, 2007
    San Antonio Texas
    The goats will adjust, that is the least of your worries. I brought my goats from Indiana to Wyoming and the climates (and ALTITUDE) are completely different and they were fine.

    Ron Keener does small animal transport, he's got a yahoo group.

    Or, if you know someone going to Nationals and they know someone going, that can be a good way to transport goats.
     

  3. ksacres

    ksacres New Member

    161
    Oct 30, 2007
    San Antonio Texas
    That would be a big fat no. I know of several people that have gotten burned by the big league-ers. There are some really good ones out there, but a popular name doesn't mean diddly, as their culls sometimes end up in homes that thought they were getting (and paid for) show quality goats.

    Ask for pictures from ALL angles, posed and unposed. Ask them to list the strenghts and weaknesses. ALL goats have weaknesses, and if they won't tell you, or state that there are none, run away. Even finished champions and 93EEEE appraised goats have faults, you need to know what they are so you know how they will fit into your herd. NO, I repeat, NO goat is perfect.

    Honesty is a good place to start.
     
  4. redsticker

    redsticker Member

    113
    May 7, 2009
    SE Louisiana
    Well, I've heard that since Nigis are small they can be shipped on a plane like a dog could, but maybe they were just talking about the babies... :shrug:
     
  5. ksacres

    ksacres New Member

    161
    Oct 30, 2007
    San Antonio Texas
    From what I have been told, the weight of the carrier and goat can't exceed 45 pounds. I would think a full grown Nigi, even a small one, would weigh more than that.

    It costs right around $200 to ship a kid.
     
  6. Just Kiddin'

    Just Kiddin' New Member

    200
    Nov 18, 2008
    Southern California
    I just paid to have our Corgi shipped in. I would think it would be the same rules for goats. They said over 50 lbs. between dog and carrier and it starts to get more expensive. I don't remember what the total weight was but he weighed 12 pounds so it was under 50 lbs total and it ended up costing $332.00 to have him shipped on Continental airlines. American Airlines only wanted $265.00 but they wouldn't ship him because of the heat. If it's 85 degrees or more anywhere along the route they won't ship. Continental must put theirs on a different part of the plane because it was in the 90's and they didn't have a problem shipping :shrug:
     
  7. redsticker

    redsticker Member

    113
    May 7, 2009
    SE Louisiana
    Thanks for the info/advice... ;) I'm probably going to just try to buy from someone in the south, that I can drive to.

    But that still worries me with how hot it will be in a trailer driving for example from Texas to Louisiana. How do people keep their goats cool when traveling to and from show and other breeders, etc.?
     
  8. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    I am about to move from Az to Pa and I am taking my goats. I have set up an automatic watering system in the trailer to ensure they will have plenty to drink. Also I will place ice bags(pillow cases full of ice) in the trailer for them to lay near to help keep them cool for the first part of the trip. I ont know how your shipper will do it, but this is how I intend to.
     
  9. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    as to the climate question-- if your air shipping then there are certain dates that you can fly because of the temperature difference.

    let them relax at your new place..dont mess with them for a few days, and they'll adjust to the new area