Buying untamed kids

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by hawthorne, Mar 15, 2011.

  1. hawthorne

    hawthorne New Member

    10
    Mar 13, 2011
    Hi all, I am new to the forum and new to goats as well!
    I am currently looking into purchasing my first Nigerian Dwarf Goats. I plan to get 2 doelings and have found a reputable breeder relatively close by that has 8 week old kids available.

    Now, my only concern is that she told me they are straight off their mom's and basically are not handled at all until being sent to their new homes. She assures me that they will tame down very quickly once taken away from their moms, is this true? My main concern is that I will have 2 wild kids that will be terrified of me. So, is it possible to tame 8 week old kids that have not been handled?

    I plan to keep these goats as pets and milkers so being able to handle them is a big deal for me. Any help is appreciated! :)
     
  2. TinyHoovesRanch

    TinyHoovesRanch New Member

    Sometimes kids tame, my doe Jenny was SUPER wild when I got her, the next day all she wanted was to be with me in my lap. SO its possible!
     

  3. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Yeah, it's very possible for them to tame down...it just takes a little time and patience. I sold 3 skiddish wether kids and heard back a week later that the kids were coming up to the owner to be pet and she was surprised how quickly they warmed up to her.

    My concern is that if they haven't been handled at all, have they had any vaccinations or anything? You'll want to look them over and make sure they look healthy. ;)
     
  4. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri
    It's possible to tame them yes, about 80% of my goats DID tame to me, some did not though, in fact I am still fighting for one to like me, I have had her since September, LOL.

    A way to a goat's heart is food, once they learn you're their new "mommy", you should have no problem. All my goats HAVE come up to me, so if I need to catch them, it's possible, it's just when you go to pet them some don't want to have none of the love!

    Don't forget to talk all sweet and calm to them, shake the grain bucket, yada yada, this will train them to come if you need them ever. When I need my goats I say "here goat goats!!!" they know when I want them :D

    The younger the better I noticed, btw. When you breed them, try to handle their kids, it makes life so much easier, and usually a good selling point. No one really wants a feisty doeling, at least if they can choose a friendly one :p
     
  5. milk and honey

    milk and honey Senior Member

    Oct 30, 2010
    Everett, WA
    Raisins go a long way in getting kids tame...good luck and welcome!! From Washington state
     
  6. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri
    Raisins? Never heard of that, GREAT idea! Very healthy for them.
     
  7. Dodge 'Em

    Dodge 'Em New Member

    204
    Jan 13, 2011
    Cedar Hill,TN
    Keep the kids up for a few days, feed them, sit in the stall with them, just try and bond with them. Most will come around, some wont. It also depends alot ( in my expeirence) on the dam, if she was very wild or not. I have a doe now, that snorts at me everytime I get around her, and usually her kids are the same way.
    Good Luck with your kids.
     
  8. kids-n-peeps

    kids-n-peeps New Member

    477
    Aug 24, 2009
    Virginia
    Now this is just me, but if friendliness is really important to you . . . I wouldn't do it. There's a chance they will tame up, but there's a chance they won't. I have had two bought at 8 weeks old that never became what I would consider friendly despite my family working with them A LOT using ideas listed above. All the kids we have had, though, handled from birth have all been friendly. I personally think it's really important to handle them. I would look for a breeder that makes a point to handle them.
     
  9. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri
    Yep, sometimes it's spook, sometimes it's the goat though, I got a set in September, the only one that warmed up to me was the buck, the does are still avoiding human touch, lol. I think they know what happens when I touch them... >.>
     
  10. wookiee

    wookiee New Member

    100
    Oct 26, 2009
    I agree with the above, they can be tamed. However, I would also echo the concern that if they have not been handled, have they been tattooed, vaccinated, disbudded, hooves trimmed, cocci preventative, wormed, etc?

    Most reputable breeders of dairy goats I know disbud kids because it is part of the standard. Most also tattoo and register the kids.

    I would ask for a history on the kids. Most reputable breeders also keep notes.

    I am not a big name breeder and I have no reputation, but my kids are handled daily, have had all the maintenance performed and are sent home with a collar and detailed notes on vax, etc. Especially in a small herd where you will intensely bond with your dairy animals, details matter.
     
  11. hawthorne

    hawthorne New Member

    10
    Mar 13, 2011
    Thanks for all the helpful replies everyone!
    The breeder does disbud/vaccinate/worm her animals so it isn't that they have been left completely untouched. They have been around people but minimally so.

    I have been looking around to see what my options are but the next closest breeder with registered goats is 5 hours away. Has anyone heard of the 'Cedar Glen' line? She is well known in Canada and this is where I am considering getting the two kids. Hm, not sure what to do now :scratch:
     
  12. Sarah

    Sarah New Member

    133
    Mar 11, 2011
    Olive, Oklahoma
    I'm new here also and new to goats too! So here's my experiences...i just got a 4 month old doe from a man that had a huge herd that ran on 160acres. He threw out food for them and picked them up and put them in a pen when it was time to sell. That's about all the handling and her herd mates had. She wasn't exactly wild but she sure didnt want us around so we had too corner her and it took two of us to get her in the crate to get her home. I put her in a designated pen with a kid her age that was tame and spent lots of time with her. The very next day she was completely turned around. I cannot go anywhere without her wanting to go! and i havent had her for a full week yet!!.....On the other hand my sister-in-law bought two skittish kids from an auction and I really dont think they will ever quite get use to us 2-leggers! Hope this helps!
    *Sarah*
     
  13. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Never heard of Cedar Glen...but i'm not in Canada either. You'll have to keep us posted if you end up getting a couple kids! :)
     
  14. lissablack

    lissablack New Member

    Nov 30, 2009
    If she is the only breeder within 5 hours of you and you really want to start with goats, seems to me like it would be worth a try. You need to expect to take time to let them come around, it may not happen overnight. Or it might. I sold a couple of pretty skittish 8 month old doe kids and the person who bought them never liked them. She wanted an instant response from them, and you just aren't going to get it. I think she radiated her impatience at them and they responded with zero cooperation. She sold them to another couple, and they became so tame and loved they are treasured pets now. So it isn't only the goat.

    On the other hand, I have lines that are more friendly and lines that are more suspicious. Some of my very best goats are from the more shy lines.

    Jan
     
  15. Steve

    Steve New Member

    261
    Mar 12, 2011
    Central Ky
    Lisa your right about it not being only the goats,some people just do not know how to act around animals.If you talk loudly or have a harsh sounding voice,or make a lot of quick sudden movements most animals will be leery of you until they get to know you better.Speaking quietly and moving easy and calm around them will let them know your not there to harm them.
     
  16. peggy

    peggy Senior Member

    Aug 10, 2010
    B.C. Canada
    Okay, here is my experience..... last fall I bought 3 young doelings, two were 4 months old and one was 8 months old. They had had minimal handling and did not like to be touched. I used all the tactics mentioned and have to say that I have created monsters. When I go into the barn I get swamped by the goats looking for grain..... But on their terms. They are not looking for affection, just grain.... I used grain to entice them to like me, soft voice, gentle handling, etc, etc. The older doe has kidded since I got her so I had her on the milk stand everyday to get used to being touched. She is easy to milk once restrained, she stands good for me, but on her own, she would still rather I didn't pet her. Of the two younger ones, one actually has tamed down and allows me to scratch her sides but the other one still won't allow me to get close enough to touch her and if I do happen to get close enough she jumps around and tries to bite me. I get a little discouraged with them at times because years ago all my goat experiences were with friendly tame goats. I only plan on purchasing tame goats from now on to save myself a lot of frustration. Good luck in whatever choice you make.
     
  17. Steve

    Steve New Member

    261
    Mar 12, 2011
    Central Ky
    Peggy have they had their rabies shots??? Im just kidding im sorry.
    Biting is not ok,a nibble of your finger is fine but a bite hurts!
    Try just going in the barn without grain and just hang out,take a chair with you,when the angry mob comes show them you have nothing for them,then turn around on them and ignore them.Do some chores or something to let them know you dont always feed them when you go to the barn.Once they settle down, have a seat and just watch them or hang out with them some.Goats learn habits fast and will learn bad ones easier than good ones.

    Mine know that if i dont have a bucket i dont have food and therefore will not "attack" on site.When i do have food they will still jump and try to take the feed from me,mostly the young ones who have not learned their manners yet.A pop in the nose tends to stop the jumping after awhile.It takes patience and time for them to understand and respect you but keep at it and they will eventually get the message and hopefully let you rub on them without the biting.
     
  18. peggy

    peggy Senior Member

    Aug 10, 2010
    B.C. Canada
    Thanks for the advice Steve. I do visit the barn many many times during the day without grain or hay but they all still expect it. They do settle down about it when they realize that I have nothing for them. I admit, I spoiled them that way because I was trying to tame them down with treats. And win their affection. Now I am just a big old walking grain dispenser..lol.
     
  19. Mon Reve Farm

    Mon Reve Farm New Member

    612
    Jun 25, 2010
    Southern DE
    A lot of great conversation in this thread... the only thing I would add is using curiousity to your advantage.

    We have some at various stages but I will sit out in the pen and wait for them to come to me. I don't try to pet them but will put my hand out for them to smell. We only feed in the barn - whether its hay/feed/treats. So they don't usually "attack" me for food if I am out in the pen. I have one little doeling that will come and lay down next to me on the platform and I talk to her - I'm being very patient as she is the most timid of the group. Some took days, a few weeks, and just two that it has been months.
     
  20. hawthorne

    hawthorne New Member

    10
    Mar 13, 2011
    Thanks for the helpful responses everyone. These are all points I am going to consider. I think first I am going to go visit her farm and see the condition of her goats.

    peggy, whereabouts in BC are you? I am in the Fraser Valley and cannot find many breeders of Nigerian Dwarfs. Do you know of anyone?