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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey y'all ......this spring I had a Nigerian buckling get bitten by a spider at 6 days old. It took almost two months to get the infection completely cleared up and as a result I wasn't able to disbud him. I finally decided to have him surgically dehorned and the surgery was done on Friday by my vet. I am SO pleased with her work that I have posted pics on my website, on the 'Health" page. I plan on adding pics weekly as he heals, to show the entire process. Also on this page are pics of the skull of a horned goat, (found on the farm of a neighbor who raised Boers prior to his passing away last spring) complete with a horn, making a very useful lesson in anatomy for anyone considering dehorning a mature goat. My website is http://www.debpnigerians.com. Please study the pics as much as you like but do not copy them without my permission, okay? Thanks!
 

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the on in your signature (exactly the same as posted) works fine.



Thanks for posting this information! I think it will be a great resource for others.

I will make it a sticky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Very odd....I can go up on my search bar and type in http://www.debpnigerians.com and it goes to my website. When I click on the link in my origional post, it goes to freewebs' home page. :shock: I don't speak com-poo-ter well enough to know why. But if the link won't work for you, just type in the website and go that way, I guess!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ohmygoodness, I'm a sticky!!! :D Actually I was kinda hoping you'd do that, Stacey; I was thrilled when I found the skull for that very reason....so many people don't know what a goats' skull actually looks like. I'm planning on sawing off one horn near the base so you can see inside.
And BTW, thanks so much for explaining why the link didn't work, Pixie Dust!
 

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duh I should have noticed that! Thanks Pixie dust.

Deb do update this thread when you post new pictures so that people can go and check it out if they are interested.

NOTE: I dislike gross things but it doesn't look bad at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, I was very pleased with how neatly my vet had done the job....the last dehorn I saw, on my brother-in-law's Boer wether, it looked like the top of his head had been dug out. Evidently the large animal vet he went to used his cattle equipment on the 3 month old kid - it was pretty nasty. My vet simply cut the horn itself and then used a disbudding iron to burn the base. And he is doing so great! I do intend to post updates every weekend until there's nothing left worth taking pictures of. They'll also be posted on my website.
 

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Again, I thank the LORD that I do NOT dehorn and I can NOT dehorn my goats. They are not aloud to be dehorned to be shown
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
To dehorn or not to dehorn

There is no painless way to remove a goat's horns, true. But if you stop and think about how much time goats - wether horned, dehorned or polled - spend bashing thier heads into things as hard as they can, it simply doesn't seem logical that they can have very many pain receptor nerves in that part of thier head. I'm not saying it doesn't hurt, just that it probably doesn't hurt as bad as we think it does because we judge how it must feel to them based on how it would feel to us. That being said, I wish I didn't feel the need to dehorn my goats, but I do. The worst injuries I've seen in my animals were caused directly or indirectly by thier horns. The worst injuries I've recieved from my animals were caused by thier horns, when we owned Boers. In my area, no one is interested in buying a "pet" with horns, and so such an animal is much more likely to end up at the sale barn. I believe that the brief pain of disbudding ensures a much better quality of life for both the individual goat and all that come into contact with him/her. Dehorning is much more difficult for all concerned, and not something to be done lightly. Cabrito had a choice.....go to my vet's on Friday and be dehorned, or go to the sale barn on Saturday and end up God alone knows where. While his horns were still only a few inches long, he had learned how to use them quite dangerously, and in fact the morning of his dehorning hooked another buckling in the belly. Pride Of Texas John just won Grand Champion Junior Buck at the Texas State Fair and cost me $350.00. Either Cabrito or his horns had to go, and I made the decision based on what was better for his overall health and lifespan.
 

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I gotta say, that after going through the definitely traumatising (at least for me) experience of having Demi dehorned, I would never do it again... however she is thankfully more manageable now (having a fairly precocious and ornery manner about her, I must say)

It took a long while to heal, she still doesnt like me to touch the top of her head (1 year later) but other than that appears to have gotten over it.
 

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I just wanted to say "great website!" and I can't wait to show my kids (the ones who live in the house with me) the skull pictures. I don't think my outside kids would be that interested, but you never know. :slapfloor:
 
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