cae mastitis question

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by mekasmom, Feb 23, 2009.

  1. mekasmom

    mekasmom New Member

    8
    Feb 23, 2009
    I bought a doe in Jan who kidded a few days ago. The left side of her udder is very hard, no milk will come out. Right side is ok, a little milk. I took her to the vet who said it is CAE causing the problem. I knew she was thin when I purchased her, but they said it was because she wasn't eating grain just hay. I bought her anyway because she was so sweet.
    Anyway, my question is.......... How bad can a hard udder get? I would like to keep this nanny as a pet because she is so very sweet. She follows you like a dog, sleeps in the dog house and just roams the yard. She doesn't have a mean bone in her body. She is my favorite goat, but I had no idea she was ill when I got her.
    I separated the kid at birth because we had planned to bottle feed. Now I am very glad of that because it may have saved his life. I have separated the nanny from the herd, and just let her roam the property unfenced like a dog. The other goats are in the pasture or in the barn except for a couple of new kids in the house being bottle fed. Our kids are drinking milk from another nanny.
    Our vet gave the CAE doe two shots of antibiotics and hormones. I have put hotpacks on her, milked her several times a day, massaged her udder, etc. But there is just no milk on the left side, and it is hard like stone. What would any of you do in our place? The vet suggested culling her.
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    no vet can look at something and say it is CAE until testing is done. I say get her tested to be sure. It could just be a case of mastitis.

    As to how to treat. get some Today mastitis treatment. If the feed store doesnt have it many online stores do.
     

  3. mekasmom

    mekasmom New Member

    8
    Feb 23, 2009
    He said CAE because of her knee size, thinness, and the fact that she has this hard udder at birth with no milk. He did take blood to test, but it isn't back yet. He did sound pretty sure about the diagnosis though because he said he has seen it before, and because the hormones didn't bring in milk. I guess I just wanted to know how bad it would be to keep a CAE goat.
    And you are right, we won't make any decisions for sure until the testing is back at the vet's office.
     
  4. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    Red Flag!!!

    No vet - no matter how good they think they are - can diagnosis CAE without a test!!!!

    You can do a test yourself through WADDL. It would cost about $30.00 for everything, including shipping.

    There are way to many variables - nutrition, worms, cocci, grain ration, hay ration, ect. to just say.....

    I had a group of goats that I was going to bring home that were gorgeous - looked healthier then any I had seen! Nice weight, beautiful hair coat - CAE POSITIVE! so looks do not say anything. Might give a sign that something is wrong - but definately test her before you give up on her. I would keep her seperate till the test comes back - but I would be finding a new vet in a hurry!

    As far as the milk, she very well could have had mastitis previously. There are strips that you can order to tell you if she currently has a case of mastitis. But unfortunately, I don't know much about this subject.
     
  5. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    If it isn't CAE...I pray it isn't ..the milk is the culprit in the way it is spread...you did the right thing to pull her kids..just in case...
    she may of had mastitis with a prior kidding and that may be scare tissue remaining....if you are not getting anything out or not very much...it seems as if she may be dried up.....or that side will never milk again...due to her past.... :(
    If it isn't CAE...and is a past mastitis problem...then you can tape her bad teat and let one kid nurse from the good side.. :wink: :greengrin: If she will take 1 back...
     
  6. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    It certainly is possible given her condition that CAE is the culprit. If so I would do either of two things.

    Keep her dry for the rest of her life - can't spread anything if she doesnt have milk. Or breed her if she is in good condition to do so and then pull kids at birth. A way to accomplish this is to induce her when you know you will be around - have to have a positive breeding date so dont just let her run with the buck for a month.

    I am glad he took a sample for a test. DO you know where he is sending it too? I would ask - it is your goat so dont be afraid to question him! that is what you are paying him for.
     
  7. goatmama2

    goatmama2 New Member

    178
    Oct 20, 2007
    Upstate New York
    We had the same experience many years ago with a rock hard udder, but no mastitis. Yes, it was CAE. Although admittedly we never had her tested, she showed many symptoms. We managed to dry her off and just never bred her again. Eventually, after a good few years, her knees really went until she couldn't walk so we put her down. I would definitely test her, but the tests aren't always accurate. Don't let her be bred again if you can avoid it, just love her and keep her happy! Sorry about the mastitis, I hope all works out for her. Brooke
     
  8. redneck_acres

    redneck_acres New Member

    Oct 17, 2007
    Idaho
    Although those could be indicators of CAE-they can also be old injuries to. I'd do a test on her just to be sure. I'd keep her separate from the rest of the goats untill you know for sure.
     
  9. BeeLady

    BeeLady New Member

    I hope your goat does not have CAE and that she becomes healthy. But a healthy, well-nourished goat may not behave in the same sweet way as a sick, low-energy, mal-nourished goat. If you've bonded with her so completely, I'm sure you'll enjoy a little "naughtiness" from her once she gets her health back. That's one reason to only bring home the healthiest animals you can find as you know what you'll have over the long haul. (Plus they won't contaminate your herd.)

    I bought a horse once years ago, off a ranch, where he only had pasture to eat. Very nice, controllable, etc. Once he got on more nutritious feed he began, indeed, to feel his oats. He was basically well-trained and we never had any problems and I enjoyed his more high-energy self, but he was not the same horse after all nutritional requirements were being met.
     
  10. goatmama2

    goatmama2 New Member

    178
    Oct 20, 2007
    Upstate New York
    LOL BeeLady, we just adopted a barn kitten and my husband was commenting on how sedate and sweet she was. Well she had several infections, and now that the antibiotics have finally kicked in, she's ruling the house and pretty much terrorizing everyone! I agree that all animals are better beings when they're healthy; I'd rather have a healthy "kooky" one than an unhealthy, quiet manageable one.
     
  11. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    have the tests come back yet?
     
  12. mekasmom

    mekasmom New Member

    8
    Feb 23, 2009
    I haven't heard from the vet since Thurs. I took her back in for some more hormone injections and antibiotics. She is getting 8cc of a sulpha drug twice daily in the thigh near the hard udder. He didn't say the tests were back when I was there this week. I am getting drips from that side now, but it is still rock hard. Her other side is giving almost a quart a day. That is still a low amount from an Alpine, isn't it?
     
  13. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    I would call on Monday and ask about the results. A quart a day is low yes but given her condition one cant be to upset