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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Curious question, how often should a herd be tested? The reason why I am asking is because the doelings I'm thinking of getting, the herd was tested back in 2008, and no test since. I was going to test yearly, get everything done after 30 days after I think they are bred... Now I'm skeptical about getting these doelings.... Opinions please?
 

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city-turned-country girl
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Every year, or every 2 years. If you maintain a closed herd I would imagine not even 'needing' to test regularly, except that buyers like current results.
 

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Are they willing to let you pay for testing before you take them home?

I have to admit that I will bring home goats if I trust the farm I'm getting them from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Every year, or every 2 years. If you maintain a closed herd I would imagine not even 'needing' to test regularly, except that buyers like current results.
Would you consider buying these kids if the last time tested was 2008?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are they willing to let you pay for testing before you take them home?

I have to admit that I will bring home goats if I trust the farm I'm getting them from.
They are way to young to get tested unfortunately... The other problem is they wean the kids at 4 weeks.... I think that is way to young..., but I was planning to bring them home and try to bottle feed them... One is 8 weeks, and the other is 5 weeks.
 

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for me it would depend on a few things...
what lab was used to test and the indicator % ...for ex: with Biotracking 40% or more is Positive for CAE if the doe in question tested near that..say 35% then that is close to a 40% to make me want to retest her ....but if her % was 14% then I would be more confident her Negative score stands..

If the lab does not use the Elisa method then I would want tested redone...
 

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Now I'm skeptical about getting these doelings
The other problem is they wean the kids at 4 weeks.... I think that is way to young.
I think you should follow your gut. ;)
 

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It really doesn't matter what other people do. What makes YOU feel more comfortable? If you don't feel comfortable about it, then don't get them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
for me it would depend on a few things...
what lab was used to test and the indicator % ...for ex: with Biotracking 40% or more is Positive for CAE if the doe in question tested near that..say 35% then that is close to a 40% to make me want to retest her ....but if her % was 14% then I would be more confident her Negative score stands..

If the lab does not use the Elisa method then I would want tested redone...
That's just it Happybleats, they don't have the paperwork:( Mine came back 8-9% Do you think 4 weeks is too young to wean? I was going to try to start them on bottles once they got here to see how it goes.... I think my gut is saying no...:( But then everything could work out.
 

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Goat Girl
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4 weeks is way too young to wean. Their rumens are barely developed by then. I've known people who unknowingly bought kids that age, they were told the kids were eating hay and grain well and would be fine. Brought them home just to have them die in a couple weeks. :( You can try to get them on a bottle, but it can be difficult at that age. Any breeder that does this is not a breeder I would want to do business with, sounds like they are more interested in making a buck than the welfare of their animals. I also wouldn't go with a test from 2008, surely they have added new goats in the last 5 years. Also, goats can seroconvert (test negative for years, then suddenly test positive) so one negative test isn't really reliable. I think you can find some kids that are just as nice from a more reputable breeder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
4 weeks is way too young to wean. Their rumens are barely developed by then. I've known people who unknowingly bought kids that age, they were told the kids were eating hay and grain well and would be fine. Brought them home just to have them die in a couple weeks. :( You can try to get them on a bottle, but it can be difficult at that age. Any breeder that does this is not a breeder I would want to do business with, sounds like they are more interested in making a buck than the welfare of their animals. I also wouldn't go with a test from 2008, surely they have added new goats in the last 5 years. Also, goats can seroconvert (test negative for years, then suddenly test positive) so one negative test isn't really reliable. I think you can find some kids that are just as nice from a more reputable breeder.
My wethers came from someone who weaned at 4 weeks, but boy did they LOVE me once I gave them a bottle...:) I weaned them at 12 weeks...they are a year old now and thriving:)
 

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Curious question, how often should a herd be tested? The reason why I am asking is because the doelings I'm thinking of getting, the herd was tested back in 2008, and no test since. I was going to test yearly, get everything done after 30 days after I think they are bred... Now I'm skeptical about getting these doelings.... Opinions please?
Most breeders that test will test every year. This helps with showing that you are serious about keeping healthy goats. Once a herd is closed I would like to see a breeder still test for at least 2 years after the herd was closed. If they keep the herd closed then technically they shouldn't have to test any more. I would (in my opinion) still like to see a closed herd tested every other year as a sign of good faith as most tests have a chance for errors.

Also kids should not be testing until they are 8 months old (unless doing genetic test such as G6S for Nubians) as anything done before 8 months of age is very inaccurate. In the case that they own both sire and dam for the kid in question you could test both sire and dam for the testing you desired. Most state labs offer service either free or at a lower cost for instate residents (depending on which state check with your state lab) for these services.

Now in my herd I normally wait to test until they have kidded. I do not like to stress pregnant goats as some of my girls do not like having their blood drawn. So if it was me I would personally either draw before they were bred or after they kidded depending on what works best in your herd set up.

Hope this information helps.

Best Wishes.
 

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I agree with ptgoats45.....100%! And without paper work...whose to say they actually tested them.
Sure it could work out...BUT what if it doesn't...there are plenty of goats from reputable breeders who are up front about testing or not testing and who raise them with care who deserve your business.....weening at 4 weeks is not raising with care..some babies grow up and do just fine others are stunted and sickly...its a toss which way these little ones will go..I have put 4 week kids on the bottle..its work but can be done..Be careful not to bring them home because you feel sorry for them
(that why I have 8 donkeys lol) but be sure they are right for your program...and that you are ready for what may come...Luckily it worked out with my donkeys..maybe it will work out with these little ones...you just got to be really careful what you introduce to your herd. I wish you all the best..what ever choice you make..you have goat spot right here support you:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Not going to risk it... I'm just keeping the big girls for now and see what Daisie kids etc... and go from there... Thanks for your input, much appreciated:)
 

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Curious question, how often should a herd be tested? The reason why I am asking is because the doelings I'm thinking of getting, the herd was tested back in 2008, and no test since.

If they maintained a closed herd, did not show and the does did not come into contact with outside goats, and all results for the previous two years or more were negative there was no need to do additional tests.

I was going to test yearly, get everything done after 30 days after I think they are bred...

Actually, you probably want to get them tested before they become pregnant. Less stress for the does.

Now I'm skeptical about getting these doelings.... Opinions please?
If in doubt, ask to see the test results - all of them. Listen to your instincts, and follow your gut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yes, I'm not getting them... there was something just not right about the whole thing, and she wasn't even able to tell me birth etc...
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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Here is how you should run your CAE testing. Test twice a year (before kidding / before breeding). You test before kidding so you dont freshen a positive doe and allow her to raise positive kids. Not to mention baby goats love to snitch from just about any udder that walks by. You can infect an entire kid crop with just one positive doe. You test again after the milk season which is typically just before the breeding season. So more or less 6 months apart. The stress of the milking season can often times bring up the teeter count on a doe that is was recently infected.

Keep testing twice a year for 2-4 years if you are a fairly closed herd. Then from this point on it is up to you how often to test. Here we test twice a year regardless of all the past years previously negative test results. Its a bit spendy but worth the piece of mind that we get from it.

NOTE: you can test kids at any age. The reason for waiting till they are 6 months old is if they are raised on pasteurized positive milk, then they will have a positive level teeter count even though they do not have CAE. But after 6 months (if weaned at 3 months) the teeter level should have returned to normal and you can usually test and get an accurate result.

Am glad you decided not to get the kid. It would be easy enough to quarantine / test the kid as needed. But the weaning at 4 weeks is unacceptable. Anyone who practices this method of raising kids would instantly get their number removed from out list and I would warn anyone who ask about that person. You simple can not wean that young and create a quality kid. Sure they may by some miracle turn out later on in life, though I doubt it, but its just not good goat husbandry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Good advice... I guess I was thinking to make sure they were pregnant to take blood and kill 2 birds with one stone... but testing before makes a lot more sense.... and then after as well.. Yep makes sense:) Thanks!
 
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