CAE

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by TheMixedBag, Dec 11, 2010.

  1. TheMixedBag

    TheMixedBag The Hoofcare and Repro specialist

    Oct 16, 2010
    Glencoe, OK
    I got the results in for CAE for the two does I tested for pregnancy yesterday. Milky Way's positive. The cutoff was 35 and below, she tested at 79. Right now, I'm just at a loss as to what to do. I don't want to breed her again, and her kids will be bottlefed, but after that, I just don't know. The other doe tested negative, and I haven't tested my buck yet.

    I have left a message with the guy I bought her from. He didn't breed her, but he bought 2-3 other goats from the same breeder as her, and I don't want it spreading in his herd.
     
  2. milkmaid

    milkmaid I'm not addicted - I'm in love!

    I'm so sorry you're having to deal with this. I'm still new to goats and haven't experienced CAE yet. I dread it. Hopefully someone on here has some good advice. :hug:
     

  3. lissablack

    lissablack New Member

    Nov 30, 2009
    It's a good thing you tested. If she was mine I would separate her and cull her when the kids are born. I know it isn't as high a risk, but it is possible that transmission can occur from other fluids besides milk. (urine, saliva). Since the transmission risk from a breeding with a positive buck is very small but there, maybe 5% or less, it may not be a great idea to assume it can only be passed through milk. Also, if you want to use her milk later you should pasteurize it. I know they say it cannot be passed to humans, but I also know someone who got terrible arthritis problems after exposure to it. I think it is an unknown.

    Culling is hard, but you need to protect your herd.

    I know not everyone feels this way, but to me it isn't worth the risk. This is just what I would do. Lots of people live with CAE in their herds I guess. It isn't as bad as CL, but is up there pretty high.

    Jan
     
  4. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I am so very sorry........ she tested positive... how devastating.... :(

    Wish I could tell you how to handle the situation but.... it is up to you.... on what you want to do with her..... I would get rid of her but...... again...... that is up to you...... :hug:
     
  5. TheMixedBag

    TheMixedBag The Hoofcare and Repro specialist

    Oct 16, 2010
    Glencoe, OK
    I took her on the faith that I keep her for life, so culling is kind of out of the question. I'll keep testing the other two, but after they've been together for nearly 2 months, you'd think it'd have spread already. Then again, maybe not.

    However, I spoke to the guy I bought her from last night, and the doe he bought with her tested positive as well, but neither doe is showing signs of CAE, just the tests are positive. Since these kids are going straight to butcher after weaning, I'm not concerned about them being dam-raised. I highly doubt I'll breed her this year, but if I do, it'll be AI to a boer.

    For now, she's happy, comfortable, and has no clue she's got a nasty virus, just the way it should be.
     
  6. TheMixedBag

    TheMixedBag The Hoofcare and Repro specialist

    Oct 16, 2010
    Glencoe, OK
    Just an update-Biotracking ran 2 more tests on the same sample, they both tested at 84 and 85, respectively. He is also running experimental tests on the sample since it was hemolyzed, and I'll be sending in a fresh sample Thursday, so right now I'm looking at her having the antibodies, with a higher chance of her not actually having the disease. I'll send in one test sample from one of her kids, just as an experiment for myself (which sounds absolutely horrible, but they'll be butchered the day I'm taking samples).

    The doe she was bought with (one I don't own) tested positive as well, and the guy I bought her from is furious about it. He's retesting everything, and if they're positive, I may not be able to keep her...
     
  7. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Gosh...I am so sorry. :(
     
  8. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Hoping and praying... things will work out for you the best..... :thumb: :hug: :pray:
     
  9. TheMixedBag

    TheMixedBag The Hoofcare and Repro specialist

    Oct 16, 2010
    Glencoe, OK
    I'm hoping things will work out too, but even if they don't, she's being replaced by that black doe.
     
  10. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  11. TheMixedBag

    TheMixedBag The Hoofcare and Repro specialist

    Oct 16, 2010
    Glencoe, OK
    Well, ok, not "replaced" (not if I can help it), but breeding-wise, she will be.

    At the very least, she can possibly help with more accurate CAE detection.
     
  12. Goat Crazy

    Goat Crazy New Member

    616
    Feb 8, 2010
    NE Ohio
    CAE Question?
    Can you have the "first milk" tested for CAE, instead of using a blood sample?
     
  13. TheMixedBag

    TheMixedBag The Hoofcare and Repro specialist

    Oct 16, 2010
    Glencoe, OK
    Um....you could call and find out? Biotracking didn't say anything at all about testing the milk, though I'm pretty sure there's someone out there who does.
     
  14. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Not sure either but ...I think it is the blood..... :wink:
     
  15. Goat Crazy

    Goat Crazy New Member

    616
    Feb 8, 2010
    NE Ohio
    I was just wondering, because it would be so much easier and cheaper for me to have the milk tested. Since CAE is carried through the milk and white blood cells, it would make sense that you could test the milk.
     
  16. Sunny Daze

    Sunny Daze New Member

    307
    May 18, 2010
    Fairplay, MD
    I know you can test colostrum but don't think biotracking tests it...think you need to send it off to one of the other labs. Of course if you are thinking about dam raising then you would want tests results sooner than that!
     
  17. TheMixedBag

    TheMixedBag The Hoofcare and Repro specialist

    Oct 16, 2010
    Glencoe, OK
    The reason they test the blood is because you want to find out *before* kids get a chance to be infected. I'm not going that route with my doe because it doesn't matter. I'm kidding her out and cutting her off. I'll milk her out as long as I can, but she's not going to be bred ever again, if I can help it.

    At any rate, I haven't had luck finding anyone who tests milk for it, probably because of this:
    "PCR can be used to detect CAE virus in milk and serum; however, PCR testing is not yet commercially available for the routine diagnosis of CAE. VI has poor sensitivity and often takes 3 to 4 weeks to culture the virus."
    From the vet.uga.edu site (I'm not linking to it, it is kinda graphic)