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I read a thread through my email posted by Brokegothorses and I can not find the same post on this Goat Forum. I too have a question about CAE. I understand the importance of buying a goat that is tested CAE negative. But recently learned that you can take your goat to shows when they are CAE positive! If we are concerned because CAE is contagious to other goats, then why are goats that are CAE positive allowed to take those goats to shows? If the place where shows occur require proof of bill of health, then why wouldn't CAE testing be a requirement?
I recently found a breeder in my area selling show quality LaManchas, that I am very much interested in investing in, and they have a healthy beautiful herd. They go to shows. They conduct CAE prevention by pulling the kids at birth... but do not test the herd for it. I originally thought that if you are showing a goat, especially when they are being penned up next to other unknown goats, that they needed proof of a CAE negative testing...? Can any one explain this? I have never attended a goat show but am interested in doing so in the future. But I don't want tobtake rhe chance that my goats would "catch" anything to bring home to the rest of my heard. Any inputs?
 

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CAE isn't airborn.
It's normal method of transmission is mother to kid through colostrum. Which is why bottle babies are the popular method CAE prevention.

However, CAE is in the blood stream and can transfer from goat to goat through blood to blood contact. This is relatively rare so that is why they don't prevent CAE positive goats from being at shows.

CL is easier to contract but you also don't need to prove negative to be at a shows.

Shows are at your own risk. There are preventative things you can do like bleaching stalls and limiting goat contact.
 

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Our shows require testing on all goats over 6 months for cl and cae, plus a health certificate from the state vet. We had a close call last year at our county fair when a special needs kid was going to bring his cae positive goat to the fair, thank God we had a good vet on hand to check the papers. The worst part was that our goat superintendent, and our county agent knew about it (he was in her club) and was going to let him bring it! Let me tell you that the fair board was unimpressed!! After that got around 3 families pulled out this year because of this shady business. The superentendaent and the county agent now hate my guts for being a whistle blower, but that's OK. This is why we always bring partitions with us to the shows as reccommended by the usda scrapie program, it works for other diseases as well. I cannot impress upon those who show to follow the guidelines of the scrapie iradication program. I find it hard to believe that everybody has scrapie tags, but very few follow the guidelines.
 

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Like Amy said the most common way CAE is transmitted is through the milk. There has been some speculation that it can spread other ways, but not any real proof that that is how the goat ended up with CAE later in life, or if the animal was always positive but did not seroconvert until it was older. Obviously blood transmission can happen since it works similarly to HIV/AIDS, which is why if you have not tested your goats it is a good idea to never share needles or syringes, just in case any blood from a previous animal got in the syringe you don't want to be giving the next goat CAE. Just to be safe though you always want to assume that it can spread via snot, saliva, etc so you can better protect your goats. All of the shows I have been to only require a general health paper, even the ADGA National Show does not require goats to be CAE negative.

I have heard of people thinking that someone sabotaged their goats by giving them + milk at a show which is why a lot of people will sleep with their goats at the show and stay with them 24/7.

Going to shows you can always catch something, the most common being pneumonia. You can vaccinate for pneumonia to help prevent this and you can take measures to ensure your goats safety such as not penning near other goats, not allowing any nose to nose contact. Giving the judge a baby wipe to clean his/her hands before they touch your goat. If they ask to look in the mouth, open the goats mouth for them, etc.
 
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