The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am only curious, but can a doe lose her babies or birth early from getting rammed by another goat repeatedly? I have posted quite a bit about concerns around one of my dry does that will be bred very soon. (SIDE NOTE: I just spoke to the vet and he agreed that once she births in the spring, we will test the placenta for several diseases.)

I am wondering if testing comes back clean, which is a possibility, then it strongly leads me to believe that she may have birthed early because the other goat we had was terrible, with a capital T. She would repeatedly ram my good, pregnant doe viciously. We were freshly new to goats and I asked goat owners around me about the temperament of this crazy goat and they remarked that it seemed odd to have such an aggressive goat. Anyway, we "got rid of her" because she became dangerous around people and results came in that she was CAE positive.

Anyway, I'm just wondering if anyone has lost kids in utero because of a roommate goat being too aggressive?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wow, that's terrible! I didn't realize that it could be severe enough to rupture the uterus. Wow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,224 Posts
I seperate my heavy pregnant does to their own paddock. They are about 3 to 4 months pregnant and showing alot. They get moody and akward. So big prego girls stay together. This stops alot of this situation.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
8,197 Posts
I had a basher- never realized it until one day I came into the barn from the back and they didn't see me. Basher hit a couple preg. does and then a few kids. After going over the records for that pen (20 does in it) over a couple of years, I realized that the 2 abortions (yay, not chlamadia) a broken rib, a kid with a broken shoulder and other injuries were from the Basher. She went to the sale the following Monday. I made sure she goat a blue tag. (no place in the world for a bashing goat, first goats then people.- there are too many good goats to have to deal with a Basher! )

Since the injuries were random and occasional, I never had reason to believe a goat was causing problems. And the pens are huge with outside access, no crowding etc. I figured just random normal stupid goat injuries. (Abortions were treated with medications, per the vet, but no testing was done- stupid on my part).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wow, I'm sorry that happened, but that's great you discovered the culprit to the problems!!!

That's what I'm wondering with my previous "basher" goat. That goat was terrible and even would attack kids - especially kids! I would have to dump water on her to keep her from ramming us. She was terrible. I am hopeful that our current dry, black doe doesn't have any disease that had caused her original premature birth of about three weeks early - the doelings were born on March 2, 2019. Two beautiful doelings were born alive, but died within a day. Our dry, black doe unfortunately was closely penned with the nasty, basher goat. We had seen our dry goat getting rammed by the basher goat, but honestly, we couldn't figure out how to handle all of that. We were completely new to goats. The basher goat remained on our property for a total of 4-5 months. She gave birth on March 22 to two kids (boy and girl), and we found out on the day of her birth that she was CAE positive. We decided to get rid of her the next day and the dry, black goat adopted the two kids from the basher goat. Our vet was very surprised she had adopted them. She nursed them for about 4 months and was very close to them. She was very sad when her doelings died three weeks before and she transitioned to the new kids rather easily and then couldn't be without them. Anyway, our dry, black goat became pregnant again in the fall, but unfortunately, she wasn't cared for very well and had bleeding about one month after being bred. She and another two goats (Nubian buckling and a Lamacha doe) at the time remained inside premier fencing, mostly in one spot, and had inconsistent hay and water and no minerals, herbs, etc... My husband was in charge of the goats at the time. He was in charge from the beginning when we had gotten the goats in the fall of 2018. The goats under his care were not maintained well. He was overwhelmed and struggled with getting out to the animals. My husband was relieved when I took over all the goats in February of 2020. I had to make some adjustments to my schedule, but it has been worth it.

I'm just hoping this beautiful, dry, black goat gets pregnant and is able to have a successful birth and healthy kids. People in my life think I've gone crazy over these goats, but honestly, they are so sweet and their conditioning and size have improved so much. I can't help but stare at them while petting them :)

Her story will unfold and we will learn so much more on the other end of this, especially if there is any real disease going on. We will test the placenta at the end of this, but let's hope she makes it there! I plan to put her with the Nubian buck the week of Sept 28 for three weeks. The ND buckling will hang with the Nubian wether while the Nubian buck is away. I then will place the ND buckling with the brown, Nubian doe that is currently in milk the week of Oct 19. Her doeling will hang with the black, dry Nubian doe while she is away. This is the current plan. We shall see!

The dry, black doe will have a due date around the end/start of March. We are in the midwest, so I need to prepare for cold weather. We have wrapped stalls with layers of straw before and it can get pretty warm.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top