Can weak pasterns be bred out?

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by Dreamchaser, Feb 6, 2010.

  1. Dreamchaser

    Dreamchaser New Member

    Oct 29, 2008
    Camp Verde, AZ
    I have been told that my doe has weak pasterns. I am not sure exactly WHAT that means. I know where the pasterns are, not sure what makes them weak or strong. (Still learning)

    I have heard that you should cull out weak pasterned goats, but she is my only starter alpine, and I think she has a lot of other good qualities that I want to keep and pass on if I can. She has a nice topline, and a pretty good brisket. She is tallish, not huge, but not tiny either. There are other things I love about her, and she has a really nice head, and I don't think her ears are too long. And lastly, I love her unusual color pattern.

    Is there any hope for me? :sigh:
     
  2. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Yes ...pick a very strong pasterned buck ...and that will improve if not correct the problem... :wink: :greengrin:
     

  3. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    Ditto
     
  4. Dover Farms

    Dover Farms New Member

    Oct 16, 2007
    NW Ohio
    I agree also.

    One thing to remember is that legs, pasterns, and feet are the most important thing on the scorecard. On senior does it's worth 15 points, juniors 23 points and bucks 25 points. :thumb:
     
  5. citylights

    citylights Member

    824
    Jul 3, 2009
    Southern California
    Also, as the goat ages, the suspensory ligament can "relax" causing them to go down on their pasterns. Or if they haven't had good hoof care and the toe grows too long, the heels can crush leaving them lower in the heel. Once again, that will strain the susp. lig and cause them to go down as well....
     
  6. SterlingAcres

    SterlingAcres Member

    996
    Oct 19, 2009
    Maybe for us newbs, you can post photos of good examples and bad examples?
     
  7. nutmegfarm

    nutmegfarm New Member

    543
    Dec 22, 2009
    NE Ohio
    If you look on my site, since my computer is being dumb, the oldest and first saanen doe on the page, she is 5 and has great pasterns for A.) being a saanen, B.) being older (show wise) C.) for being a "big" lady! Her pasterns are almost comparable to the 2 year olds right underneath her!! As far as the breeding thing, yes it makes a huge difference breeding to a buck with good feet. The 2 year old saanen was bred to the buck with photo and the saanen kid has better feet than her mom by far (yes I know kids have better feet than older does, but even now with her being almost the same size as her dam, they are better) :)

    -Meagan

    http://nutmegfarm.webs.com/
     
  8. Dover Farms

    Dover Farms New Member

    Oct 16, 2007
    NW Ohio
    Yes, look at Meagan's Saanen doe. She has good strong pasterns, see how they are pretty much straight up and down? Now look at this pic I found: http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/sheep/ansc442 ... age008.jpg See how this wethers pasterns are weak and are starting to go down?
     
  9. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    I learned this from a judge -- who learned it from another judge the same day he told us -- goats do not have pasterns in the front, just in the back

    just an FYI
     
  10. citylights

    citylights Member

    824
    Jul 3, 2009
    Southern California
    Huh? What are they called in the front? I've never heard that before!
     
  11. citylights

    citylights Member

    824
    Jul 3, 2009
    Southern California
    ALso, I ahave some pics at home -- b/c I started taking pics a long time ago to show to 4Hers about goat structure. I'll see if I can find them.
     
  12. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    I'm 90% sure its the same in dogs too -- no pasterns in the front

    I have no idea what its called in the front.
     
  13. citylights

    citylights Member

    824
    Jul 3, 2009
    Southern California
    huh, maybe I'm too horse focused!
     
  14. ProctorHillFarm

    ProctorHillFarm New Member

    Also mineral deficiences (copper/ bo-se/selenium) can cause weakness in the pasterns- so dont rule out management practices when it comes to feet/pasterns too
     
  15. shadycreekgoats

    shadycreekgoats New Member

    800
    Mar 23, 2009
    Northern Illinois
  16. Dreamchaser

    Dreamchaser New Member

    Oct 29, 2008
    Camp Verde, AZ
    Okay, so my doe, the back pasterns should be straight up and down. She is older though, so that makes a difference?

    [​IMG]
     
  17. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    she isnt standing right but correct she needs help in that area - have you tried copper supplement?
     
  18. Dreamchaser

    Dreamchaser New Member

    Oct 29, 2008
    Camp Verde, AZ
    I now have loose minerals out there for them. I will take another look at her today. This is a pic from last year.
     
  19. citylights

    citylights Member

    824
    Jul 3, 2009
    Southern California
    More on pasterns -- this from the int'l boer goat assoc. breed standard, but I would imagine it would apply to all goats... ---

    "The pasterns must be strong and short. Age weakens pasterns and hauling can
    cause a temporary flexibility of the pastern as can excessive weight such as that of
    a heavy pregnancy. Poorly trimmed hooves can make the pastern appear faulty.
    In determining breeding values of a goat the producer can consider that the
    pastern weakness is temporary. The judge of a show, however, must appraise the
    goat by its appearance on the day of the show."

    How old is your doe?
     
  20. Dreamchaser

    Dreamchaser New Member

    Oct 29, 2008
    Camp Verde, AZ
    She is anywhere from 7-9 years. She also has soft pink hooves that want to turn under. I have a difficult time keeping her trimmed properly. She was a mess when I got her.