Canned goat milk

Discussion in 'Dairy Diaries' started by BetterBuckskins, Sep 18, 2009.

  1. BetterBuckskins

    BetterBuckskins New Member

    386
    Feb 1, 2009
    Taxachusetts
    Has anyone here ever done this? I have been wondering about it as I don't really have a lot of freezer space and we will be drying off a lot of the milkers soon. Any info or advice?
     
  2. RunAround

    RunAround New Member

    Feb 17, 2008
    Massachusetts
    AND Frozen milk tastes bad. :sick:
     

  3. BetterBuckskins

    BetterBuckskins New Member

    386
    Feb 1, 2009
    Taxachusetts
  4. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I have a secret to "fix" the texture because of the separation....set it in a pot of warmish water to thaw..shaking it up and changing the water OR what I normally do is set it in my kitchen sink to thaw then use a stick blender to bring it back together.

    I would imagine you can "can" it, I've seen directions on putting it in jars....though I would imagine it would have a cooked flavor to it.
     
  5. RunAround

    RunAround New Member

    Feb 17, 2008
    Massachusetts
    I've tried thawing it like you said, still has the bad texture. Maybe different butter fat levels? :shrug:
     
  6. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Yes, it very well could be that. I noticed that it will usually do the separation or flaking thing after it's been frozen for 3-5 months...I do freeze raw, I wonder if it would separate if you pastuerized first?

    The directions for canning milk is in the "Goats Produce Too" cookbook.


    For the water bath method, fill sterilized jars to within 1/2 inch from top, tighten lids and bands and process in canner with water level to the neck of the jars....bring to a boil and start timing once the water stays at a gentle boil, boil for 1 hour and remove from canner to cool for 24 hours before moving.

    Pressure canner......fill jars the same as above and place them in pressure canner with 2-3 inches of water. Process at 15 pounds pressure for 10 minutes, remove and let cool 24 hours.