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Goat Crazy!
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Discussion Starter #1
Well, Annika (Nigerian Dwarf) will be 11 years-old in March and she has kids due in May. She has outstanding good health. But due to her age, I want to pay special attention to her health and nutrition. Especially since we almost lost her 3 years ago from hypocalcemia and ketonuria. She has an extremely thick winter coat, so I will have to be extra diligent to check her body condition as her pregnancy progresses.

I just read this in an online course (from Langston University) I am taking:

"While evaluating the dry goat program, care should be taken to separately manage the aged does. Your nutritionist should design a feeding program for the transition does 3 weeks prior to kidding (third lactation and over) utilizing the Dietary Cation-Anion Difference (DCAD) formula to provide a more anionic ion side of the balance. In goats, this can be most effectively done by adding ammonium chloride to the feed. Do not feed this to young does (second lactation and under) as this can lead to nutritional rickets."

The gist I am getting out of this is that I should add AC to her grain in her last month of gestation. Yes? I never heard of this before. Any input?

What else can I do to ensure she stays solid and healthy through this pregnancy and lactation?
 

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Goat Crazy!
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Discussion Starter #6
So....adding ac in that last month can, presumably, prevent her from developing ketosis? And, of course, the article doesn't say how much to add. Not sure yet if I'll do it or not. But I will be monitoring her very closely.
 

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Goat Mentor
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So....adding ac in that last month can, presumably, prevent her from developing ketosis? And, of course, the article doesn't say how much to add. Not sure yet if I'll do it or not. But I will be monitoring her very closely.
Not ketosis, hypocalcemia, it would seem. But it seems a bit counterintuitive, because I think the best way to prevent hypocalcemia is calcium. :bonk:
 
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