Cashmere

Discussion in 'Fuzzy Fibers' started by alyssa_romine, Oct 23, 2007.

  1. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    How do you "harvest" cashmere??? I was thinking that you just brush it when the goats start to shed their winter coat...am I right?
     
  2. jBlaze

    jBlaze New Member

    254
    Oct 9, 2007
    Oregon
    Here is what I found. I don't know about cashmere goats, but a C type pygora can be combed or sheared, depends on the coverage and that goats tendency to shed. (some shed more readily than others.) I got this from : http://home.earthlink.net/~fibergoat/id12.html

    The amount of Cashmere a goat produces depends on a number of factors, the most important of which is how much selective breeding is in the genetic background. The amount of down produced depends on the diameter, the length of the fiber, and the overall fleece coverage. The cashmere fiber is the goat's winter coat. Its growth is responsive to light. It begins to grow around the summer solstices (June 21st) and ends around the winter solstices (December 21st). Shearing takes place from December to March, the time period when the goat naturally begins to shed its winter coat.
    Harvesting is by either shearing or combing. Small herds can be combed to recover the fleece, but with larger herds it is more economical to shear the goats.

    Hope that helps. :)
     

  3. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    Thanks...that did help.
     
  4. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Alyssa, Yes all I use is a dog undercoat comb to comb them out The way I tell if they are ready to start being comb, if you pet them and you just gently pull a little and the fiber comes out, then you can start combing.
    I have some does that start to lose the fiber in Jan and others that are as late as April. There is a lot of different reason that they lose it. The main reason is kidding. I have a doe that will start to lose her fiber about a week before she kids. It makes it nice, I am able to save the fiber from getting ruined from the kidding process, and I get to know when they are about to kid.
     
  5. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    Thanks. My buck has the fiber so it will get nasty but I was hoping he would pass it on to his kids. He isn't a stinky boy yet but he will be a year old in Dec.
     
  6. jBlaze

    jBlaze New Member

    254
    Oct 9, 2007
    Oregon
    A breeder where I got some goats says that she just used some borax when washing her buck fleeces and you'd never know they came from a buck. I don't know, but you could try it. Good luck. :)
     
  7. prairiewolf

    prairiewolf New Member

    97
    Oct 17, 2007
    southeast Kansas
    What breeds are most likely to produce cashmere? Seems like I heard some spanish goats can?
     
  8. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    PrairieWolf, the best way to get Cashmere is from a goat that is bred to produce the best cashmere. A CASHMERE GOAT.

    JBlaze, if you wash a cashmere goat or any goat that has fiber on it, you will ruin the fiber. It will mat and it will not be usable for anything.
     
  9. jBlaze

    jBlaze New Member

    254
    Oct 9, 2007
    Oregon
    I did not mean wash the goat! =) lol.
    Someone told me that they do, but I sure wouldn't do it.
    Yes, there are directions for washing the fleeces after of course they are shorn from the goat.

    and the funny part, when I first read the msg, I saw "it will get mad" then re-read "matt". too funny.
     
  10. Double Tree Farm

    Double Tree Farm New Member

    5
    Nov 8, 2007
    MO
    Prariewolf, you are actually correct :D

    The Cashmere goats have Spanish meat goat ancestry. Most goats, other than Angoras, will produce an underdown, if this underdown fiber is long enough and fine enough it can be considered cashmere producing goat.

    The history of the Cashmere producing goats can be traced to Asia, Australia, etc. originally being wild or feral goats that produced the heavy under coat as natural protection to the elements.

    Then as the fiber became popular, those goats that produced the fiber were domesticated and bred to other goats that produced a long dense under coat.

    Due to the Spanish influence the Cashmeres are also raised for meat as well as fiber.
     
  11. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    I have washed my buck while he had his cashmere coat and it hasn't matted up....I brushed him after I rinsed him and while he was damp. I didn't let him go back out with the herd until he was dry. I don't plan to use it since he doesn't have enough to do anything with but that is a great thing to know Sweetgoats, thanks!