Castrating an Adult Buck

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by peggy, Jul 31, 2017.

  1. Viki

    Viki Active Member

    107
    Oct 29, 2017
    I had my male goat castrated at 3 yrs old. He did great with no problems. She surgically removed them and stiches the vessels and incision. He never had a problem. The biggest problem would be infection. Not sure where you live but you want to,do,it when it's cold and there isn't flies to carry infection to it. Good luck with your guy. My big guy did great!
     
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  2. peggy

    peggy Senior Member

    Aug 10, 2010
    B.C. Canada

    I did not buy the bander. Boy I stressed for months about what the best way to castrate my big guy would be. Literally months! Now it is months since he has been done and all the drama is over. Please follow the posts as I will explain the method I finally chose.
     
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  3. peggy

    peggy Senior Member

    Aug 10, 2010
    B.C. Canada
    It has been months since I posted, I apologize to those wondering what happened. After stressing literally for months about how to best get my big guy castrated, I finally decided to take him to the vet and get him surgically castrated. (which incidentally cost as much as the bander) It was not an easy decision as I know there can be complications with surgery and taking his size and age in to account, I was worried. But luckily after a bit of touch and go, he pulled through and is back to his old self, only better. My one word of caution when doing this method is to make sure that your vet knows what they are doing and has a vast knowledge of goats. My vet missed a bleeder when she did my guy and had to go in again and re-operate which was even harder on him. Luckily I was at the vets office so we got him back in right away but had I had the surgery done at the farm and the vet had already left then it might have turned out differently. But thank goodness it all worked out. I had him on meds for a while to avoid infection. On a side note, my big guy seems to be going through some physical changes, his big beard is thinning out and his coat is changing. Getting smoother and losing his longish hair. He also seems easier to handle and is more interested in treats than girls...lol... BUT when one of the girls is in heat, he remembers what he was supposed to do. So during their heat cycle I separate the girls so he isn't pestering them too much.
     
  4. deerrungoats

    deerrungoats New Member

    6
    Mar 16, 2018

    Yes, I am located in Central NY so now would be the best time to do it. We just got another foot of snow!!! I am leaning more towards purchasing the callicrate bander and perfoming it myself due to the fact that I have 3 and the cost of having it done surgically would be almost $1,000.
     
  5. deerrungoats

    deerrungoats New Member

    6
    Mar 16, 2018
    Wow. I'm glad to hear everything worked out ok. How scary!! I am still considering purchasing the Callicrate bander since I have three bucks to do. The cost to have them done surgically would be $1000. Yikes!!!! Thank you for sharing your experience.
     
  6. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    I bought the Callicrate PRO bander last year and used it on three goats. I sell wethers every year and most of them are too big for a regular elastrator by the time I'm ready to band them at 3-4 months. I really like it. It's very simple for one person to use.

    I've used both banding and surgical castration methods on full-sized bucks and I have to say go with banding. It's much easier on them physically, it's far less risky, and recovery time is much, much quicker. It seems like it would be more painful to band but it's not. I gave banamine before banding and a couple of them were quite sore for a few hours afterwards and showed it by laying around and occasionally crying. They felt much better after a few hours and none went off feed. It was nothing compared to the pain experienced by the ones the vet did surgically. That pain lasted for something like 2-3 days and no one was hungry that night after the procedure. We take our goats walking every day. The surgically castrated ones couldn't walk at all the first day and walked gingerly for two days afterwards. The banded boys walked gingerly with us that same afternoon and were normal by next day.

    Word of caution on the ratchet bander--if there's a lot of long winter hair, shave it first. The last boy I did had a very hairy scrotum and the hair got caught up in the clip so when I cut the band, the tool wouldn't come loose. I'm not sure how to explain it, but the hair had pulled between the clip and the tool and made it so the clip wouldn't slip out of the tool when the band was cut. The poor goat had to endure quite a bit of yanking and monkeying around while I fished out a screwdriver to pry the tool loose from the clip. Besides, banding is uncomfortable enough without the added discomfort of hair being pulled and twisted under it.
     
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  7. deerrungoats

    deerrungoats New Member

    6
    Mar 16, 2018

    Yikes. Thank you for the tip. I think I have made up my mind to purchase the Callicrate Pro Bander, just searching around now for the lowest price. I hesitate to ask but what happens to the band and the testicles afterwards. I know they shrink and shrivel up but then they fall off???
     
  8. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    Yes, they fall off eventually. It will take a few weeks or even a couple of months. They are shriveled and lifeless after the first day and they continue to dry up for the next week after banding. I like to apply wound spray (such as Blue-Kote) to the sore that forms above the band as it cuts through. Otherwise it gets a little oozy and gross.
     
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  9. deerrungoats

    deerrungoats New Member

    6
    Mar 16, 2018

    Thanks. One more question: How do you keep them still while you are performing it? I don't have any type of stanchon device. I was just going to have a helper and a bucket of fruit they love?
     
  10. mariarose

    mariarose Well-Known Member

    I have heard people here say that rather than have a large mass rotting, the have cut the dead testicles off. At this stage of development I've only used a burdizzo.

    I believe the large banders were originally meant for cattle, who have long tails. Goat owners should be prepared to pay close attention, as @Damfino does, or be willing to cut away rotted tissue, because bucks don't have long tails.
     
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  11. mariarose

    mariarose Well-Known Member

    Head holding devices are not difficult to build, relatively simple concepts for even a NONDIYer like myself. I do suggest you build one for many reasons, not just this one.
     
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  12. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Scary stuff for sure.
    Glad he is OK after all he went through.
     
  13. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    You can use a helper instead of a stanchion. I would tie the goat to a stout post and have the helper body-check him securely against the fence. Some will barely notice when you tighten the band. Others will jump like you're killing them so make sure your helper is ready and make sure the goat is tied in case he slips out of your helper's grip. The faster you tighten the ratchet the better. Have your cutting tool in your pocket so you can cut the band quickly. I watched several videos before I tried it myself just to be sure I had the procedure down pat.

    To make sure my goats didn't hold grudges, I gave them extra loves that evening, and when they were feeling well enough to eat I made sure they got some special treats. I didn't mess with them when they were very sore at the beginning. They weren't in the mood for petting or eating and I didn't want them associating me with being in pain. If your goats are wild it doesn't really matter, but if they are to be working wethers or pets you need to make sure and bond with them after banding so they don't become afraid of people.
     
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  14. Madgoat

    Madgoat Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    I was in the same situation, my buck was also 3 and already a proven breeder. So I debated which way to go and decided, like yourself to get it surgically done. My vet specializes in equine reproduction, but did an AMAZING job on him. I dropped him off in the morning and picked him up that evening. He was "sore" but had minimal swelling, no fever or infection and after the first night, was back on his feed. I'm glad your guy had a good experience also. Pogo's attitude has changed quite a bit, for the better.
     
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  15. Viki

    Viki Active Member

    107
    Oct 29, 2017
    I live in central my also and it cost me $180 for them to come to my house and do it.
     
  16. deerrungoats

    deerrungoats New Member

    6
    Mar 16, 2018

    Wow. Was that per goat or for 3? Can I ask who you used?
     
  17. capracreek

    capracreek Well-Known Member

    471
    Apr 5, 2016
    Missouri
    I prefer to do the babies. That is just me! Good luck
     
  18. mariarose

    mariarose Well-Known Member

    @New-goat-mom since you are thinking about selling your newest boy as a herdsire, you may find this thread useful for giving into to the new owners.
     
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  19. New-goat-mom

    New-goat-mom Well-Known Member

    May 21, 2017
    Texas
    I actually saw this thread and thought hmmmm... you know, great minds... ;)
     
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  20. Viki

    Viki Active Member

    107
    Oct 29, 2017
    That was for my full grown male. $45 for farm call and the rest was for castrating pain meds and tetanus and good trim. I use leatherstocking vet in New Berlin ny