The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would have a choice between to farms of the same size (21 hectare) in the same climate and weather area. But they are different in landscape and vegetation and possibly Soil:

Here are some pictures.
Farm 1:






Farm 2:






They both have water, but Farm 1has a stream flowing through it and a mountain ridge with lots of bushes, Farm 2 has more area to plant, is flatter with just one area which is more rocky and has some bushes in it.

Which one would be the better choice and how many goats would they be able to carry?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Shade is a premium in your climate. I would choose farm #1. It's easier to take out trees then rebuild them.
Farm #1 is indeed full of trees and bushes. Farm #2 has some, but has an area were they are already planted (pecans), but they will need time to grow. Alfalfa could be planted in between (10x10m between each tree).
Farm #1 bushes may have more biomass as they get water in that hill. The area with natural trees/bushes is certainly smaller for farm #2 as they have been taken out for some irrigated vegetable fields.

day - temperatures for both: 15 - 25 degrees celsius in winter and 25 - 32 in summer.
night - temperatures : below 10 in winter, but it rarely freezes. Summer nights are rarely below 15 degrees, but will be below 20 generally. The area has got summer rains and is dry in winters.

What about fence?
Both are fenced in.
Farm #1 has has some fencing around it, with narrower mesh. It has some encamped areas for the vegetable (maybe I should post a photo on that)
Farm #2 has a game fence around it. One house is fenced in, but has less internal fences. It has more plantable areas.

Maybe I should look through the photos again for some of the fencing.

On farm #2 we spotted some gifblaar, which needs to be managed. Not sure whether this is also on farm #1, but will be more difficult to find (and managed) there. It's a problem for cattle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Are you wanting to do food plants for humans as well? That would also affect the final choice. The water is really a tempting benefit though.
I consider planting some vegetables, especially garlic there and pecans or fruit trees as well. Farm #2 has more space for that, but farm #1 has the permanent stream through it. Both have lots of water, which isn't guaranteed in that area.

Maybe I should get the satelitephotos that give more info on the overall terrain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here are sattelite photos of the farms:

Farm #1:

It's the piece in the middle, the fences maybe difficult to spot and it goes until the stream running south/west to it. The open fields next to the access two the road also belong to it.

Farm #2


I think the borders are clearly visible.
Bushveld in the West and some arable land in the East. I think with the buildings the arable land is about 10 hectare, presently vegetables and trees are planted there.

Don't be confused by the coloring. Pictures have been taken at different times of the year. Coloring would be similar, if it was the same time of the year. Green is during summer or raining season and brown is during winter or dry season.
 

·
Goat Owner
Joined
·
75 Posts
The real questions with your choice between these two farms that I see is 'What do I want to be my main production? What secondary options do they give? Which one has the better infrastructure for what I want to do?'
I say this because the pros of the first deal with the trees, bushes, stream and rocky terrain whereas the second has more plantable land. Also the less infrastructure that you have to worry about setting up, the faster you can get your operation going.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,603 Posts
I will tell you a creek is a real blessing. Our last farm had a creek on it. It was great for getting water for the animals, for when the power went out, etc.

Really, either of them look nice, but what are you farming? Goats? Fruits, Veggies? Cattle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the responses. I did some studying on farm #2 concerning the plants to be found there. There is a rocky area in the left-down corner and unfortunately it seems it got some gifblaar. This is a problem, but still manageable. The farm does however two good houses, planted pecan trees and a good irrigation system. It is also possible to plant lusern (alfalfa) and other fodder plants there.

Btw, I also visited a Toggenburg breeder South-East of Pretoria today. I will tell more about this later. I also will respond in more detail later. It's just that I will be traveling to Europe tomorrow, so I got to cut it short for now.

Under the line it looks good for the project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,603 Posts
I would just take your time and really check things out to make sure you pick the perfect one :) Or the one you can make perfect :thumb:
 

·
www.wildheartsranch.org
Joined
·
2,343 Posts
If you are looking primarily for goats it seems like #1 would be a better choice. More forage, good water source, shade, better fences. And looks like rocky hills which goats like to climb, and would keep their hooves in shape. Farm 2 would be better if you were primarily growing crops but you said that 1 does have some land set aside for it. If that's your secondary goal and goats are first I would choose 1.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
They both have a rocky area, but #1 has a bigger one. The fences at #2 are game fencing which locks in/out even better. I may have to game fence #1 completely, which will cost another R80.000 The old fences could be put to other use, tough. Another advantage of #1 would however be that there comes some water and fertile soil from the ridge/slope. So while the plantable area is smaller, the yield per ha may be bigger. Will have to read up on fertility. My concern is just that the gifblaar maybe hidden in the ridge, which makes it less manageable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Isn't it amazing how many things need to be considered when you want to farm?
Especially, if you look into all-around-use like I do. Just to list it:
- horticulture, planting fodder
- goat keeping
- agrobusiness (i.e the dairy)
- residential and tourism

So one needs to look at:
- water
- surface
- vegetation
- existing infrastructure
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
If you are looking primarily for goats it seems like #1 would be a better choice. More forage, good water source, shade, better fences. And looks like rocky hills which goats like to climb, and would keep their hooves in shape. Farm 2 would be better if you were primarily growing crops but you said that 1 does have some land set aside for it. If that's your secondary goal and goats are first I would choose 1.
Meanwhile I eyed another farm ~size with a variety of areas. The prize is far better and I think I almost get the same value: two houses, one flatlet, 4 garages, orchard, good water, lots of bushes and large variety of plants, camps, a milking stable previously for cows, but can be revamped to suit goats.

I've taken pictures, but not finished editing. If interest is there I can post them next week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,603 Posts
If love to see, I'm sure others would as well!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top