CL Information

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by RunAround, Jan 28, 2010.

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  1. RunAround

    RunAround New Member

    Feb 17, 2008
    Massachusetts
    What is it?
    CL is short for Caseous Lymphadenitis, also known as "Cheesy Gland." This disease infects the lymphatic system of the goat and causes abscesses both internally and externally. The disease is usually external and the abscesses can occur anywhere there are lymph nodes. It can also be internal and/or in the lungs of the goat causing them to cough a lot.

    It is called Cheesey Gland because the stuff in the abscess is very dry and cheese like.

    How is it spread?
    CL is spread by open abscesses, once they open and the abscess material is allowed to touch the ground the whole ground is infected. Any goat that walks on that ground is at risk of catching CL. Cl can also be spread if there are internal abscess by one goat coughing on another.

    Can I test for it?
    Yes

    You can do an ELISA blood testing for CL, but it is not the most accurate and most people don't even do it because of how inaccurate it is. A goat can have an active abscess, but still test CL negative because there are not enough antibodies in the blood, so it is best to do both or just culture the abscess.

    The best way to test for CL is by culturing every suspicious abscess in your herd. Culturing can be done by taking a sample of the abscess and sending it off to the appropriate testing facility. It is best to have your vet deal with the abscess if possible.


    Is there a cure for CL?
    No

    How can I prevent transmission to other goats?
    First make sure the goats test Negative, then vaccinate them. It is best to vaccinate for the specific kind that your herd has been exposed to if it has been exposed. If your herd has never been exposed then it is not advisable to vaccinate, because once vaccinated they will always test low positive for CL on an ELISA test.

    Should I lance and drain the abscess?
    NO!
    If you have a goat with an abscess about to rupture do not try to treat it yourself unless you have to. It is best to take them to a vet and let them clean it out and deal with the abscess. If that is not possible and you need to deal with the abscess yourself then be very carful. Try to put your goat on concrete floor with trash bags/feed bags covering the floor. Wear gloves and a gown if possible. Lance the abscess and let it drain into some gauze. Then flush the abscess with iodine. Don't let anything touch you or the ground. Once done put the goat in isolation in a stall that can be bleached. Burn the gauze and anything you used to clean the abscess. For anything you can't burn then bleach, including the floor. Don't forget to get a sample of the abscess to send off for culture.

    Can People get CL?
    Yes! People can get CL and should wear gloves when handling a goat with an open abscess.

    Where can I find more information?
    http://www.phlassociates.com/phl_-_autogenous_cl.htm
    This site also talks about how they make a vaccine specifically tailored to the strain of CL on your farm.

    http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/artic ... nitis.html

    What labs can I test for CL through?

    WADDL: http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/
    ELISA testing and culture
     
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