Clipped my first goat

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by NDinKY, May 29, 2020.

  1. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    Today I clipped my first goat. One of my goals this summer is to get everyone clipped so I can try to better evaluate conformation and areas for improvement. I’ve clipped horses before but goats are a bit different. I used the milking stand but definitely want to get a metal stand where I can put a fitting headpiece. My husband had to hold him for me to try and get his chest and head. His head isn’t great, but he’s not going to be shown anytime soon. I clipped so his hair is 1/2” long. Also, his legs were wet from the grass so they didn’t get clipped.

    Does anyone have any tips on how to properly set goats up for photos? I realized I have no clue on how to get good conformation shots.

    Here’s Slate:
    7751BADF-0216-41E2-B49A-4FDCBE9FCB77.jpeg 0888FEFB-B802-48C7-9482-DD62D8246CAE.jpeg
     
  2. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Looks like a nice job!
     
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  3. Morning Star Farm

    Morning Star Farm Well-Known Member

    367
    Sep 26, 2018
    https://featherandscalefarm.com/how-to-show-your-goat/

    Here is a good article on showing. When you set them up, you bend over and place their legs by hand. You actually have him set up pretty well in the 2nd photo. You want their fore legs in line with their withers, so you could draw a straight line down from their withers through their legs to their hooves. His could be placed a little farther back.
    You want their rear legs aligned with their pins so you could draw a line from them through their hocks. His rear leg on the camera side is correct, but the other one appears to be a little further back. Always set up the legs closest to the judge first.
    Once you get the legs placed, you can take your index and middle finger and lightly tickle their loin until you feel their back drop down.
    Always keep the collar up under their chin while you are showing. That is where you have the most control. And try to stay close to their shoulder on the opposite side of the judge. With Nigerians it's very easy to reach over and around to set them up. You shouldn't have to move much when you are in a line up.

    If you do a simple search for dairy goat shows you will get a lot of pictures of people in the ring with their goats and get a good idea of how to do it. Ideally when you're not setting up, you should be standing out and away from your goat so the judge can see them, similar to horse showmanship stance, facing their front toes at a 45° angle, while keeping that collar in their throatlatch.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2020
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  4. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    So when you take photos - take a bunch! Get down below level of the goat - 2nd shot is much better. Evaluate what angle is most flattering to your animal and how you set him/her up. Taking photos from too much of an angle from behind may show a dip in the chine that is not really a problem. Too far forward makes the chest/brisket look narrow. In the first shot, his head is overextended making his brisket look non existent - his legs are too far behind. You want his legs set squarely underneath the shoulder, and in the rear, the hock level with pins, not set too far apart. For does, picture and udder (if young) underneath the escutcheon. You want the legs in the front square - not toed out or in, and in the back square as well, not toed out or in. Goats with better conformation naturally set themselves up - but if there are challenges you need to try to set them up for a more flattering appearance. Also make sure feet are trimmed - he looks like he is not upright on his pasterns in the pic.
     
  5. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    Thanks so much for all that advice! I’m going to work with them on the proper position. He didn’t want to stand still tonight, but I’ve not worked with him before.

    I’m working on his feet. His pasterns are better than they look in the pic but I definitely am working on improving my trimming skills. I tend to leave the toes too long and not be as aggressive as I should be. It’s like a mental block from my horse days with the angle of the hoof.

    When setting them up do you just literally pick up their foot and put it where you want it? And then hope they keep it there?
     
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  6. Morning Star Farm

    Morning Star Farm Well-Known Member

    367
    Sep 26, 2018
    Yes, that's right. It takes practice, but they will learn. When you first start working with them, after you move them keep your hand near there for a minute or two, so if they move it, you can simply replace it. Usually they like it because it's a natural position.
    When I first started trimming hooves, I did that too. But soon I learned from an expert to try to line up the cut with the lines on their hooves. If you look closely you will see horizontal lines similar to the rings on a tree trunk when it is cut. Ideally, you want the whole hoof base level with one of those lines.
     
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  7. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    Excellent, thanks!

    I’ve been trying to go by their ridges but I get nervous about taking too much. The more I trim the more I’m comfortable being more aggressive. I did just purchase a hoof knife which is helpful as I can take slices more gradually. This guys feet were in rough shape when I got him, and he’s got some pockets I’m trying to correct. The hoof knife is helping with that too, I’m just not quite sure how high up to go with the pockets in the hoof wall.
     
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  8. elvis&oliver

    elvis&oliver Well-Known Member

    830
    Jun 27, 2018
    Pa
    He’s a handsome looking boy!
     
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  9. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  10. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    Thanks! I am hoping to use him on a lot of does this fall.
     
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