Clueless new goat mom- due to a rescue!

Discussion in 'Beginners Goat Raising' started by Lindsey545, May 20, 2020.

  1. Lindsey545

    Lindsey545 New Member

    3
    May 20, 2020
    North Carolina
    Hello!

    I am a chicken/pig/rabbit momma who was just "gifted" 2 goats born in January in a type of rescue situation! 2 boys (Outlaw is a pygmy/fainting and Bandit is mini Nigerian).

    I am terrified. Outlaw earned his name after he led me on a 2 hour chase through our neighborhood and ran out in front of a semi truck. I was scared and sobbing! We got him alone (before Bandit) and he escaped the pallet hog lot he was in. Since he is so skittish, I couldn't just use food to lure him back. AND "helpful" neighbors chased him which I think made it worse.

    Right now, they are living in a covered 10 x 10 dog kennel. I AM NOT HAPPY ABOUT THIS. But we took them in to save their lives so I hope they can cope until we get their 32 x 48 lot built this weekend. We are planning on using those graduated cattle panel that start with 2 inch at the bottom, then 4, and finally 8. I am so traumatized by Outlaw's escape, I am looking for info on how to keep my mini rescue babies in. The panels are 52 inches tall- they shouldn't be able to jump that correctly?

    Right now, since I am working from home, I go sit in their kennel on a chair and try to feed them animal crackers (not too many) raisins, and carrots for about 20/30 minutes a day. Is there hope for these little boys to eventually come around and love me? Right now they don't even want to be touched.

    Lastly, do I need to band them both or can I keep my blue eyed Bandit as a buck to maybe breed one day if I decide to keep on with goats?

    ANY advice on fencing, taming, or anything else mini goat would be APPRECIATED. This hog momma is totally out of her element! HELP ME!

    Location is North Carolina,
     
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  2. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Definitely band them. They stink if left intact. They will be fine until you get their area done. The Nigerian could jump the 52" height but not a guarantee that he will. Time, time and more time spent with them is what it takes. That is great that you rescued them.
     
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  3. HungryFox

    HungryFox Well-Known Member

    262
    Feb 6, 2020
    New England
    How terrifying indeed! It sounds like you have a good plan forward to prevent more escapes though. Do be aware that especially small breeds can jump well. Keep any climbing structures or houses away from the fence line to prevent "goat stairway to freedom".
    I am not familiar with the longevity of cattle panels, someone else may know. Goats are steppers and rubbers, which strains any kind of fence.

    A Mini Nigerian?

    Your plan to "tame" them sounds good to me. Patience and gentle approach will make them more at ease. For the ones that still don't want to come around, I do a bit of forced love. Gentle capture, sit down with their rear legs tucked cozy, and sweet talking with petting. Some goats simply never had petting, they must learn it is nice.
    As you learned, chase is bad. Guiding them where you want them is more effective. Chasing sets off their prey animal instinct.

    Goats require fresh water, they won't drink it dirty.
    The finest quality hay. Horses survive happily on lesser quality, unless you have a rich biodiversity of browse (a natural goat diet, top down munching, grass is good but NOT their main nutrition filler.)
    Loose mineral is as important as water and hay. MOST herds will do well with Sweetlix Meat Maker or Purina Wind and Rain. A very underestimated need is copper, zinc, and sometimes selenium intake. Loose mineral may or may not maintain their needs.


    It is my opinion that there are far too many bucks left intact that should not be.
    You will be more content keeping not stinky animals.
    With mix breed goats that have a rough background and no pedigree, I strongly encourage banding them.
    I also strongly encourage a full vet work up and disease testing based on information given. Cheap goats are often expensive problems. You want to be well aware of their individual needs and not introduce other goats if there is no conclusive disease testing from both ends.
     
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  4. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    A hot wire around the top of the enclosure will help to contain them. Do you walk them? Either a leash and collar or a halter? I would start by tying them up rather short and feeding them. That way, they get used to being tied. And you can pet them while they eat.

    Don't play chase, go in and calmly deal with them. At first, sit with the feed (whatever they eat) at your feet. Don't move, let them come up and eat. Continue this for awhile, then progress to where you can tie them up to eat.

    Then, let them out on a leash to their new pen. If you just turn them out, they very well may jump out and run off.
     
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  5. happybleats

    happybleats Well-Known Member

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    Oh boy..what a scary ordeal. So both boys are about 4 months old. I would definitely band both but wait until they are 6 month to band. That will give lots of growing to help prevent UC.
    Gather fresh fecal from both and send it..include a coccidia check.
    Cattle panel should work as long as both are large enough not to fit through the holes. However if they have horns cattle panel will be a horn risk. There are goat panels that do cost a bit more but will save you huge head aches in the long run.
    As for winning them...you are doing good. Small treats and time and patience.

    Make sure to have a few important medical
    supplies...such as thermometer, antibiotic, b complex, cd antitoxin, tetanus antitoxin, pain medication like Banamine. 18 and 22 g needles and 3 and 6 cc syringes. There is a full list here i. Group but the as e are some important to get you started. A drenching syringe and hoof trimmers are good to grab as we.
     
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  6. Lindsey545

    Lindsey545 New Member

    3
    May 20, 2020
    North Carolina
    Thank you all so much for the encouragement.

    Both Outlaw and Bandit came up and ate out of my hand today. Not bad for owning them for 1 and 2 days. They were super timid and didn't want any pets but gotta start somewhere!
     
  7. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    You may want to use sheep and goat fence stretched tight and low. Our Nigerians could squeeze through the larger sections of cattle panel when they’re young. In fact we use that as a creep feeder for the young ones. They are escape artists so if you think there is a small possibility they could get under, through, or over then they most likely can. Ours love to show us weak spots. We have hot wire run the entire perimeter on top and down low. Also keeps coyotes out and LGDs in.

    Good luck with your rescues and would definitely recommend wethering!
     
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  8. Goatzrule

    Goatzrule Well-Known Member

    Feb 7, 2013
    New England
    Take a book into their pen and read to them out loud. Helps the m get used to your voice and your presence
     
  9. Lindsey545

    Lindsey545 New Member

    3
    May 20, 2020
    North Carolina
    At what age should I band them? We have a friend that is a cattle farmer who is going to do it for us. He also has experience with his own 10ish goats.

    They were born in January/February.

    I worry if I do it now, it may damage the relationship that I have started to build with them. lol do goats hold grudges?
     
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  10. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    They don’t hold grudges for things like that. Otherwise none of the kids would want anything to do with me after disbudding. It’s best to wait until at least 4 months, 6 is better since you don’t have any does that risk getting pregnant.

    We do wether earlier than that as NDs mature very quickly and can breed as early as 8 weeks (they’re very precocious things). We usually wether right before they leave for their new home, which is usually 9 weeks. We use this time frame based on the advise of other ND breeders.
     
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  11. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

  12. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  13. Goatzrule

    Goatzrule Well-Known Member

    Feb 7, 2013
    New England
    I agree with wethering them soon.
     
  14. Angel A

    Angel A Active Member

    126
    Apr 4, 2020
    North Idaho
    I would band them ASAP. We usually band our boer goats by 12 weeks. I know yours are smaller, but at 16 weeks, that’s getting up there.
     
  15. Angel A

    Angel A Active Member

    126
    Apr 4, 2020
    North Idaho
    Get a bag of goat treats.
    It’s like crack for goats! Mine love them. I have some that are licorice flavor and then
    EA549F26-B37B-4357-8178-05C7CA4EDE3E.jpeg
    there is a different kind that is banana and ginger flavor. This kind is smaller in size.
    416C00C5-FBDB-48B9-9CD7-9A41FE33DF47.jpeg
    That might help with making friends
     
  16. happybleats

    happybleats Well-Known Member

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    We prefer to band between 4 and 6 months. 6 is better for growing the urethra out larger which helps prevent urinary calculi.
    Glad they are doing good!
     
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