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My mother in law has a mini colicing right now. We had given her "stop colic say whoa" still no bowls. I'm not very educated with horses. And help would be great.
She is gargling but to me it looks like there is no improvement with the meds say work in 30 min. It's been 30 min. She still wanting to lay down and stuff.
Thanks in advance.
 

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My made would colic all the time. We would give her milk of magnesia so check and walk her till she would poop. I have heard of mineral oil but again walking after that so since you gave her some meds I would start to walk her. If she is like my made was she is not going to be happy but keep her on her feet and moving. I DO NOT beat my animals but I would even have to smack her to keep her going when she had it bad. Hope this helps ya :(
 

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Whisky seemed to help our full sized horse, GREEN GRASS, do not let the horse roll, and if you can get a hold of banamine, that can be a miracle drug. :hug:
 

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My mother in law has a mini colicing right now. We had given her "stop colic say whoa" still no bowls. I'm not very educated with horses. And help would be great.
She is gargling but to me it looks like there is no improvement with the meds say work in 30 min. It's been 30 min. She still wanting to lay down and stuff.
Thanks in advance.
How long has it been since she was wormed? Heavy worm load can cause colic. Keep her moving, do not let her roll, and you might consider calling the vet. Oh, almost forgot - if her pen or pasture is sandy and the grass is short, or she is being feed on the ground it could be sand colic.
 

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DO NOT WALk a horse with colic! That is very, very old information and not correct. If a horse is colicy and wants to lay down, let them, but if they start to roll get them up, but don't walk them unless that is the only way that you can keep them up from rolling. Walking can do more damage then good, if the gut is twisted or impacted, walking can tear the gut apart. Depending on what type of colic it is, gas colic, impaction colic, poison colic, twisted gut colic, will depend on the treatment. If you don't know what kind of colic you are looking at, you probably will want to get a vet involved.
 

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Good to hear she's feeling better!

Just a note here.... If you worm her and she still colics afterwards, you might need to try the Panacur Power Pak on her. It might be encysted strongyles. My mare was colicy about every two weeks last year during the summer until I used the power pak on her. At first I thought it was sand colic because of the drought and them eating down to the dirt. But that seemed to do the trick!
 

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Oh good! I'm glad she's feeling better. :cool: When you set up your worming schedule remember to rotate wormers. Horses should be wormed 3-4 times a year, but they need to be wormed 2X a year - once with ivermectin and once with something else like safeguard. I do ivermectin in the spring, and safeguard in the fall.
 

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And if it is from sand you can give her selenium fiber. My mare was a rescue horse and the last time she coliced a friend told me to soak some grain (after she was better) in mineral oil. I did that and she pooped dirt balls out. After that she got selenium fiber. But it could be so many things as well and may have been as simple as a bit of moldy feed. Glade she is doing better :)
 

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DO NOT WALk a horse with colic! That is very, very old information and not correct. If a horse is colicy and wants to lay down, let them, but if they start to roll get them up, but don't walk them unless that is the only way that you can keep them up from rolling. Walking can do more damage then good, if the gut is twisted or impacted, walking can tear the gut apart. Depending on what type of colic it is, gas colic, impaction colic, poison colic, twisted gut colic, will depend on the treatment. If you don't know what kind of colic you are looking at, you probably will want to get a vet involved.
I agree ^^ Walking can also makes them more tired and makes it harder for them to recover.

To check for sand in her gut, take some poop samples, a few balls from a few different piles, put in a bucket and add water. Stir it up to break up the balls. Let sit about 20 minutes and slowly pour the water out. Do this very slowly if she has sand in her gut the sand will settle to the bottom of the bucket. You want to pour it slowly so you don't accidentally dump the sand out. A vet will do this with a glove, they will just pull a sample straight from her rectum, turn the glove inside out add some water and wait about 20 minutes. You will see the sand settle in the bottoms of the fingers.

Psyllium works really well to get the sand out of them. I have also heard that black oil sunflower seeds work well too.

I have heard of horses getting fatty tumors around their intestines and that can cause them to colic.
 
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