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Colorful Quality Boers
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there any good tricks or tips to drawing blood from BIG massive buck necks? Or is it just a "Good Luck! *you're gonna need it!*" kinda thing? :)

I have not yet attempted to draw blood from a buck, so am just curious, as I can see it being VERY difficult!

Thanks! :D
 

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Funny that this came up, I attempted to get blood from my ND doe just about 10 minutes ago and it was a horrible failure! I had my friend who is a vet tech (for dog and cats but he draws blood every day, figured it's the same concept, should be easy right? Ha!) come over and try, he couldn't even find the vein! And my poor girl struggled like we were trying to kill her. I couldn't imagine trying on anything larger. I'll be searching for a large animal vet or someone with experience with goat blood drawing to help me out soon.
 

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It helps to shave the area down to the skin and try further down the neck, where the vein is larger. I will be doing this for our herd of five in a week or two. I hope they don't put up too much of a fight!
 

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Colorful Quality Boers
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
We have gotten pretty good about drawing from the does, even graduated to not having to clip the neck! But boy out Boer bucks have such massive/wrinkley necks it seems like it will be impossible!!

Dog/cat vet to goat vet... close, but probably not close enough! :) That was nice of him to try to help! He wasn't trying to take blood from the goats leg was he? :p That's where you take it from dogs... right?
 

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Goat Girl
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The one time I drew blood from my Nubian buck when he was in rut, the vein was more to the side of his neck than it was on the does. If you can't find it on their neck, you can always try pulling the blood from their tail. This is done a lot with cattle, the vein runs right down the center of the tail, on the underside in the soft part of the tail. Just stick the needle straight in and you should be in the vein. There is a video on how to do this with cattle on the BioTracking website.
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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On a stinky buck, id suggest shaving the neck a bit but you dont have to. Also mentioned is that during rut the position of the vein may move. This is due to the swelling of neck muscles in bucks in rut. Here is a video I made that may help. Its on a doe so it may not :)

Also for a ND, their veins are much smaller so they are harder to find but the biggest thing is, they are smaller around as well and often times you will find it but you will pass through it. For them I suggest, if you think you are in deep enough or to deep, lightly pull the plunger back as you are pulling the needle out slowly. You may find you hit it after all.

 

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Colorful Quality Boers
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just came in from collecting blood from the herd... it was a success!!! YAY!

Thanks for the help! After searching forever on the buck's neck, we did find the vein, but couldn't get the needle in exactly right and kept having to start over... So we finally clipped him down to nothing where we knew the view was and got blood on the first try. :) What a relief!
 

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Glad to hear it. We did ours this year too and with the wiley ones, we found that having three people there is a way to hold them (wouldn't work for Boers, but for dairy it did)...One person sat on their knees and held the doe's shoulders with her front legs over the knees and used their shoulders to wedge the goat's head in the right position. The other person, folded the legs of the goat into a sitting position for ND's and small dairy and thensitting behind the haunches, leaned their weight over the goat, firmly holding the hocks with each hand and pressing down. The goat cannot move...this give the blook drawer a still goat to work with. For larger goats, the person holding the hocks stood behind the goat and used their knees pressing into each hip with the goat standing and again, leaned over and held the hocks down. They can't move...it's a lot of muscle though...
 

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What I learned is To first make sure you get the vien nice and plump...then lay the needle flat against the skin, inline with the vien...then lift the back end just a tiny bit..go in at that angle makes it less likely to go through the vien..
Bucks vien tend to be deeper too...and if they are the tiniest bit dehydrated, near impossible to get the vien...so poking a sick goat is not fun. Not that poking a not sick goat is fun..lol..but you know what I mean :p
 
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