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What is your suspicion for him?

  • Just adjusting to the new feed.

    Votes: 3 100.0%
  • He's got worms.

    Votes: 2 66.7%
  • He's got cocci, or another disease.

    Votes: 2 66.7%
  • The problem is with the grain/goat feed.

    Votes: 1 33.3%
  • The problem is with the hay or pellets.

    Votes: 1 33.3%
  • He is stressed and that's what's wrong.

    Votes: 1 33.3%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I am an almost 13 year old, and I've been raising goats since 2nd grade! I read my books and checked online but, I've gotten mixed results and wanted to ask more directly. My 2.5 month old pygmy goat buckling (he's wethered) has had clumpy poop on and off since arrived here at his new forever home. I feed them (I also have two two year old does) a goat feed (I don't know what brand it is, it's just the one I was recommended as a new goat owner in 2nd grade when I got goats, just your average farm store feed) mixed with Timothy pellets so they don't eat all the feed too quick. At his old facility, they fed him exclusively the goat feed and hay, so I tried to "wean" him on to the Timothy pellets, but he actually likes them and would steal them from my does' food bowls and then he wouldn't eat his own food, so I just gave him some of his own.They have a shady pasture where they nibble on sticks, bark, and leaves whenever they please. They are offered alfalfa hay free choice. They always have water and mineral lick, offered free choice. I'm pretty sure he's wormed, and my mom told me I should be able to see worms in the poop if that's the problem, but I'm pretty sure you need a lab analysis under a microscope to tell.. Other than the clumped feces, he seems to be very healthy! He runs around the pasture and plays with the other goats, he eats food normally and carries his head and tail high. His eyes are bright and his nose is clear. He wasn't a bottle baby, since he's a bit skittish, but that shouldn't affect his feces, should it?

Anyways, I'm sorry this is such a lengthy passage, but does anyone know what could be up with him?
 

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Welcom to the forum!
What color is his clumpy poo? It could be adjusting to his new way of eating. I would start by having a fecal done (you are correct in needing an analysis done under a microscope to know what if any parasite is an issue) I would also give probiotics daily until I see berries.
Something else is I would get rid of the mineral lick and grab a quality loose mineral. Goats don't get enough from the blocks. A good brand of mineral would be a sweet lix meat maker or some like using the wind and rain horse mineral.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcom to the forum!
What color is his clumpy poo? It could be adjusting to his new way of eating. I would start by having a fecal done (you are correct in needing an analysis done under a microscope to know what if any parasite is an issue) I would also give probiotics daily until I see berries.
Something else is I would get rid of the mineral lick and grab a quality loose mineral. Goats don't get enough from the blocks. A good brand of mineral would be a sweet lix meat maker or some like using the wind and rain horse mineral.
His poo has been the usual dark brown/ black color. I'll ask my mom to take him to the vet to get a fecal done and I'll try some of your other suggestions too. Thank you for helping me and getting on the case so soon, I highly appreciate it!!
 

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Dark brown to black can be parasites. A fecal would be wise.
 

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His poo has been the usual dark brown/ black color. I'll ask my mom to take him to the vet to get a fecal done and I'll try some of your other suggestions too. Thank you for helping me and getting on the case so soon, I highly appreciate it!!
Just to mention you may not have to take him to the vet. The vet may be fine with just bringing in a stool sample. That's what our vet does but I'm sure different vets handle things differently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just to mention you may not have to take him to the vet. The vet may be fine with just bringing in a stool sample. That's what our vet does but I'm sure different vets handle things differently.
Yeah, looks like all signs point to getting a fecal, so I'll check with the vet to see if that would work, because I'm sure the goat would enjoy not taking a car ride, that'd be stressful both for him and for us. Thanks for the help!
 

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You do not have to use a vet to fecal - you can get them done cheap by mailing the out in a ziploc bag in a box with an ice pack to www.meadowmistlabservice.com and it is only $6.

He needs a fecal, good free choice grass hay, timothy pellets are fine, grain must be balanced (2:1 calcium to phosphorus). What is your water source and quality? Is it hard or high calcium? He also needs good loose minerals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You do not have to use a vet to fecal - you can get them done cheap by mailing the out in a ziploc bag in a box with an ice pack to www.meadowmistlabservice.com and it is only $6.

He needs a fecal, good free choice grass hay, timothy pellets are fine, grain must be balanced (2:1 calcium to phosphorus). What is your water source and quality? Is it hard or high calcium? He also needs good loose minerals.
Sorry I'm so late to respond. We live a bit off out in the country and we have well water. I'd say it's a good quality source, it's clean enough that I'd drink from the hose. I'll try to change the goats diet and see if I can use that mail lab service. I've asked my mom to get a vet or something but we've been busy and I think she doubts me when I say there might be something wrong. Maybe this'll help convince her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Welcome to the forum. Always good to have another teen on here. Coccidia is the first thing that pops in my head. Fecal is wise to make sure. I use Corid for that, but other people use different things.
Yep, I just convinced my mom to get a fecal done. Idk why she thought I was just overreacting or something, yes mom it's serious 😐
We called in today to a vets office and we're getting the fecal done tomorrow. Whatevers up, I dont think I would've been able to sleep tonight if we didn't call in. I'll keep Corid in mind if it does happen to be Coccidia. Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yep, I just convinced my mom to get a fecal done. Idk why she thought I was just overreacting or something, yes mom it's serious 😐
We called in today to a vets office and we're getting the fecal done tomorrow. Whatevers up, I dont think I would've been able to sleep tonight if we didn't call in. I'll keep Corid in mind if it does happen to be Coccidia. Thank you!
Oops, think I misread one part, but whatever, thank you nonetheless!
 

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Hello! I am an almost 13 year old, and I've been raising goats since 2nd grade! I read my books and checked online but, I've gotten mixed results and wanted to ask more directly. My 2.5 month old pygmy goat buckling (he's wethered) has had clumpy poop on and off since arrived here at his new forever home. I feed them (I also have two two year old does) a goat feed (I don't know what brand it is, it's just the one I was recommended as a new goat owner in 2nd grade when I got goats, just your average farm store feed) mixed with Timothy pellets so they don't eat all the feed too quick. At his old facility, they fed him exclusively the goat feed and hay, so I tried to "wean" him on to the Timothy pellets, but he actually likes them and would steal them from my does' food bowls and then he wouldn't eat his own food, so I just gave him some of his own.They have a shady pasture where they nibble on sticks, bark, and leaves whenever they please. They are offered alfalfa hay free choice. They always have water and mineral lick, offered free choice. I'm pretty sure he's wormed, and my mom told me I should be able to see worms in the poop if that's the problem, but I'm pretty sure you need a lab analysis under a microscope to tell.. Other than the clumped feces, he seems to be very healthy! He runs around the pasture and plays with the other goats, he eats food normally and carries his head and tail high. His eyes are bright and his nose is clear. He wasn't a bottle baby, since he's a bit skittish, but that shouldn't affect his feces, should it?

Anyways, I'm sorry this is such a lengthy passage, but does anyone know what could be up with him?
Hi, so I have two baby Nigerian dwarfs and I have noticed the same thing with my goats. I noticed when I give them grain or sweet feed, they're poop gets clumpy. Whenever I don't give them sweet feed, it goes back to normal. I believe that too much protein or too much grains causes the clumpy feces
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi, so I have two baby Nigerian dwarfs and I have noticed the same thing with my goats. I noticed when I give them grain or sweet feed, they're poop gets clumpy. Whenever I don't give them sweet feed, it goes back to normal. I believe that too much protein or too much grains causes the clumpy feces
Noted. Thanks for your input, and sorry for my belated responses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
How are things?
Sorry I'm so late to respond. I continue to forget that I have to actually come on Google and check for notifications instead of having them pop up like a text message, haha. Its going pretty well. It seemed like it was clearing up a bit today. We got a fecal done, and results will be in within the next like 18 hours. I'm a bit nervous, because I don't see a lot of medical issues with my goats, worst things I've seen with them was when I was an inexperienced caretaker with old goats (they were already pretty old when I got them, sore joints and arthritis were terrible for them. They've all passed on now, I only wish I could go back in time and helped those poor things, I just didn't know what to do. I also didn't have the internet back then, a priceless tool now, obviously.) But enough on them, my current little guy seems to be doing well. His behavior has remained normal, he's still been eating and drinking, having a blast running around and playing in his enclosure, and he's even getting better at being handled and petted (used to be super skittish, but my does are super friendly to humans and have taught him that I'm not all that bad.)

Well I think that JUST ABOUT answers the question (sorry I can be so elaborate, I've been told I sound like a lawyer or a teacher upon occasion and sometimes I don't necessarily doubt it, hah!)
 

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Hi, so I have two baby Nigerian dwarfs and I have noticed the same thing with my goats. I noticed when I give them grain or sweet feed, they're poop gets clumpy. Whenever I don't give them sweet feed, it goes back to normal. I believe that too much protein or too much grains causes the clumpy feces
Sweet feed gives goats clumpy poo very, VERY easily. That's why I mix my sweet feed with Alfalfa pellets plus goat grower pellets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Sweet feed gives goats clumpy poo very, VERY easily. That's why I mix my sweet feed with Alfalfa pellets plus goat grower pellets.
Probably a sweet feed, it smells like molasses. It's just the same stuff I've used since I was in 2nd grade, I really don't know, and I would go check but we don't have any unopened bags currently (I keep my feed in Rubbermaid totes as we have a lot of rodents and little critters in my area, and 3 goats don't eat a whole lot, so I don't always need another bag.) I've definetly seen other threads talking about being wary of sweet feeds and maybe that's a complication here. I do also mix mine with alfalfa pellets, but not the other thing you mentioned.
 
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