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There is a major misconception about two late term conditions that pregnant does get.
I am talking about Ketosis and Pregnancy toxemia.
the first misconception is they are one and the same problem.
Though the symptoms are similar they are two completely different conditions.

Ketosis Is when a doe is bread that is over weight. In the last 30 days of her pregnancy the kids take up too much room and the doe can not consume enough food to maintain her weight, and starts to burn her fat. Burning the fat leaves ketones in her blood stream. when the ketones are high enough it cases paralysis. In my experience the chance the doe will recover are very slim.
There is no warning prior to the paralysis. you just find the doe down in the morning.

Once having a ewe with Ketosis I had the vet come but he got there too late and i lost her. The vet recommend i change my management and move the hay away from the night pen. making the ewes exercise burns the ketones in the blood and prevents the paralysis.

How many of you feed and grain your goats in the night shed?
Stop killing your goats with kindness.
move the hay out of the night shed as far as you can. then move the grain trough out and place it away from the night shed and hay feeder.
I have 300 ewes and 75 goats. i have not had Ketosis in 12 years since i changed my management.

The cause of Pregnancy toxemia is similar to Ketosis. the kids are taking up so much room that the doe can not get enough food to maintain her weight. The difference is the doe has no fat to burn. and slowly starts to starve.
A doe with Pregnancy toxemia will give you lots of warning, she will be the last to the hay feeder the last to the grain feeder will get pushed away by the other goats. she will stumble stop and rest, she will look weak and tired.
If you are feeding your goats in the night shed you may not notice these signs.
when you see a doe with these symptoms separate the doe give her a nice comfy pen with no competition. and feed her extra good hay and pelleted show feeds.
I have had ewes go down but were eating good i moved and fed Them several times a day . when they give birth they often got up with in an hour. But i prefer them not to go down.

I have been on this soap box for four years hoping that i can help people avoid these management errors.
 

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Thanks for sharing this! Here's an interesting article by Sue Reith that ties in to what you're saying.
Even though I haven't had any serious issues in the past, I am thinking I may try to put all my does out on pasture during the mild days this winter, so they can get even more exercise. They won't get much to eat out there, but the movement would be good for them. They are in a rotational grazing system spring through fall, so are pretty active. But in the winter, they are on hay. Though I don't feed inside the barn, they just don't get as much exercise as would probably be ideal in the winter.
 

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Fair-Haven
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I think the root of the problem is to evaluate your does, BEFORE, breeding. Tweeking their body condition and overall health is so VERY important going into breeding and pregnancy. If you have a small herd, you can easily feed each doe separately, evaluate wormload, minerals needed et c. Each doe individual in her needs, keeping a strict eye on overall health and body condition is paramount to me as a breeder before she is bred.
 
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