Conformation?

Discussion in 'Goat Conformation' started by Bree_6293, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. Bree_6293

    Bree_6293 Briawell6293

    Aug 3, 2014
    Australia
    I have a few goats I would like to hear the pros and cons on their conformation. I am new to goats so have no idea about that yet! I am just hoping mine are ok to keep for breeding and showing as I have fallen in love with my herd! They are all australian miniature goats.

    First is my newest doe. She is almost 2 years old and picture was taken just after weaning her first kid.
    "Jasmine"
    ImageUploadedByGoat Forum1418678459.656857.jpg
     
  2. Cedar Point Kikos

    Cedar Point Kikos Well-Known Member

    Oct 16, 2013
    Canada
    Hu, never heard of Australian Miniature goats...anyway, I'll do her from what I know of full size goats :) and hope someone comes up behind me :D

    Pros:
    -Deep jaw
    -Sweet face
    -Long muzzle
    -Wide Forehead
    -Cute ears
    -Throat latch looks clean and smooth
    -Neck is smooth and feminine
    -Shoulder is tight with fairly sharp withers
    -Neck/shoulder blends nicely
    -Front legs are smooth and straight
    -Good upright fore pasterns
    -I like her feet
    -Good depth in heart girth
    -Good depth in middle and rear barrel
    -Nice length of chine
    -Good spring of ribs
    -Good body capacity for her size
    -Rump is a nice length
    -Nice incurve to thigh
    -Good width between hocks
    -Strong back legs
    -Back legs are straight without being posty
    -Back pasterns are good
    -Flat boned
    -Good body length


    Cons:
    -Head is a bit big for her body, but that might be just the angle of the picture :)
    -Neck is too short
    -Lacks brisket
    -Lacks chest floor
    -Topline is uneven
    -Hips are quite a bit higher then shoulders
    -Rump is steep
    -Lacks heel in her back feet
    -Lacks power in front end assembly
     

  3. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    How can you tell she has good width between the hocks, is flat boned, has good spring of rib, a clean throat latch, and long muzzle from this photo? I'm just curious.
     
  4. Cedar Point Kikos

    Cedar Point Kikos Well-Known Member

    Oct 16, 2013
    Canada
    See the space between her back legs in the picture? The space between her feet is a very good indication of good width between hocks.

    Flat Boned: Look at her legs. Clean & sharp.

    Spring of ribs: See how it goes out from her shoulder, and then how it goes back in towards her loin?

    Clean Throat latch: She has a nice sharp jaw, there's no skin going right from her jaw to her neck. It's clean & sharp.

    Long Muzzled: (I should have put decent length :) ) the length from the point of the back of her jaw to the front is a nice length.

    Hope that makes sense! :)
     
  5. Goat_in_Himmel

    Goat_in_Himmel Active Member

    Jun 23, 2013
    British Columbia
    Being unfamiliar with the breed, I'll have a go based solely on comparing Jasmine with the picture of the "ideal" doe shown on the AMG Breed Standard page, so take this with a pound or two of salt. ;-) http://www.miniaturegoatbreedersassociation.com.au/breedstandard.htm
    The basic difference I see between Jasmine and Miss Model is one of stockiness. Miss Model has a broad stance, which suggests a broad body. She has a more pronounced brisket and deeper chest floor, and is more generally round in cross section, and is more muscled than Jasmine. Jasmine is longer in the body, and lean-built; she is overall more dairy in character, to my eyes. I'm not sure that she fits the dual-purpose ideal, but I am sure she is nonetheless a sweet goat! She has a pretty face.
    Really, you'd be better to get in touch with someone who is familiar with Australian Miniature Goats--preferably a breeder. But it's been a pleasure to "meet" Jasmine, and I look forward to meeting the rest of your herd.
     
  6. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2014
  7. Cedar Point Kikos

    Cedar Point Kikos Well-Known Member

    Oct 16, 2013
    Canada
    Guess some folks need hands on :) I'm not a pro, so hopefully Ariella or Lacie will do her :)
     
  8. Dani-1995

    Dani-1995 Active Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    Greenville, NC
     
  9. Bree_6293

    Bree_6293 Briawell6293

    Aug 3, 2014
    Australia
    Thanks for all that information :D some of these mini goats aware closely related to meat goats and others are closer to dairy goats. Some are used for milk production, but lots are kept as pets and showing :D
    My next on is a 7 yr old buck called billy :)
    . ImageUploadedByGoat Forum1418773789.248529.jpg
    ImageUploadedByGoat Forum1418773844.662442.jpg
    ImageUploadedByGoat Forum1418773917.137171.jpg
     
  10. Bree_6293

    Bree_6293 Briawell6293

    Aug 3, 2014
    Australia
    ImageUploadedByGoat Forum1419152205.622403.jpg

    This one is gretal, a 3 year old doe :)
     
  11. Bree_6293

    Bree_6293 Briawell6293

    Aug 3, 2014
    Australia
    The little white one above is tippy, a 4 month old buck. I know it is hard to tell with a baby, but wanting to keep him as a buck so making sure it is a good idea before he gets much older.
     
  12. Bree_6293

    Bree_6293 Briawell6293

    Aug 3, 2014
    Australia
    ImageUploadedByGoat Forum1419152429.931851.jpg
    This one is billy as well. He is the older buck that is above too
     
  13. kccjer

    kccjer New Member

    Jan 27, 2012
    NW Kansas
    I like Gretal. She is what you should be looking for. She's got a nice length and depth of body. Her rump isn't too steep and her hind legs have decent angulation. She is "balanced". That is what I like to see. I'm not good at listing out pros and cons so I really can't do that for you....but SHE is what you want to look for. You could even translate her looks into a meat goat with little problem. A very nice commercial doe.

    Your 4 month old buck....NO. While I heartily dislike the extreme uphill look of show dairy goats, this guy goes the exact opposite and is extreme downhill. Not even a good thing in a meat goat. No length to his neck and extremely steep rump. He's fuzzy and the pic is blurry so it's really hard to tell but he looks pretty posty legged too. Put his pic next to Gretal and you'll see what I'm talking about. He has no "balance" to him at all. I realize he's only 4 months old but that is still old enough to make a decision.
     
  14. COgoatLover25

    COgoatLover25 Active Member

    Dec 23, 2013


    Why don't you like the uphill stance of the show dairy goats?
     
  15. kccjer

    kccjer New Member

    Jan 27, 2012
    NW Kansas
    I just really don't like it. I think it looks....awkward? stupid?....not really the words I want but... I don't mind too much when it's not super exaggerated but some of them just make me ask WHY??? LOL Just a personal preference I guess. I like it when my animals are level. I don't want them uphill or downhill....just level. Makes them look more balanced in my eyes. I feel the same about horses, cows, sheep, etc. Don't make them taller in front or back....
     
  16. COgoatLover25

    COgoatLover25 Active Member

    Dec 23, 2013


    Here's what it says in my old dairy goat judging book-

    The preferred animal is the one that has higher withers than hips or pins, not because someone has decided it "looks better", but because that type of animal has more natural drainage and is less subject to breeding and digestive problems.


    Ever since I had read that I have agreed with it as when I had does that were not uphill , they always had manure on their hind ends, but with my uphill does they always had clean rear ends :)
    Hope this helps :) I'm sure everything that they look for in a dairy goat has a good reason for that goat to live a long, healthy and productive life.
     
  17. Udderly_Obsessed

    Udderly_Obsessed New Member

    49
    Aug 18, 2014
    Maine, USA
    I agree with Lindsey. Some things may look a little awkward but actually they are correct for good conformation. :)
     
  18. kccjer

    kccjer New Member

    Jan 27, 2012
    NW Kansas
    That makes sense....kinda. LOL But it doesn't say they should be way uphill like some that you see. I'm ok with a slight uphill but some of these are soooo exaggerated that it doesn't make sense to me. It's just taking a good trait and exaggerating it to the point of ridiculousness. It also doesn't mean that I HAVE to like it! hehehe

    But I also know that's how it tends to be with a lot of the show animals....not just goats. What is considered the "perfect" show animal doesn't always translate to what is useful in the real world. I can speak more towards cattle than goats on this. It use to be that the "perfect" show steer was tall and long and didn't finish out until they reached well over 1400 pounds. THAT was not a desirable animal to have in the feedlot. So while we're breeding show animals we also need to keep in mind the usefulness in a commercial setting.
     
  19. Bree_6293

    Bree_6293 Briawell6293

    Aug 3, 2014
    Australia
    Yer. Finding gretals is difficult. I have her on lease for one year to get 1 lot of babies from...
    I thought my little buck was ok. I took him to a show and he received reserve champion for bucks under 6months when he was 3 months old. Maybe he won't be nice when he is older though....
    This next one is a buck I have on lease for one year. His name is Aussie and he is almost 2. I pick him up in the next week
    ImageUploadedByGoat Forum1419191511.379227.jpg