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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is corn good for goats? I feed it to them just not sure if it meets there nutritional needs. What should I be feeding them? They are dairy goats just yearlings so they are still growing any help is appreciated!
 

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There are a LOT of people on here that will tell you to absolutely not feed corn to goats. I do feed it and have no problems. It's not the only grain I feed tho and they don't get a huge amount of it....unless they get out and, at this time of year, they can get their fill of corn off the ground by the bins. If it's what you have and can afford, then feed it. IMO....for what it's worth
 

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Hello,

Corn's nutrient group is energy. This means that if you feed a strict diet of corn (with hay or pasture) any energy derived from the corn that isn't used will be turned into fat! This probably is not a good choice alone or in large quantities, but as a treat it will be fine. Since she is still growing she is using energy, but not as much as a milker. I am feeding my bred yearling 16% grain mixed with 17% alfalfa pellets (and loose goat mineral). The grain has corn in it, but not a whole lot. This mixture gives her energy for growth (grain), phosphorus (grian), calcium (alfalfa pellets) to prevent Urinary Calculi (kidney stones) and to promote proper skeletal growth, and all the vitamins and minerals they need.

To sum it up: Corn alone is probably not the best choice because the animal will start to develop a fat covering. Instead feed an already mixed grain (you can mix your own if you really want) mixed with alfalfa pellets (calcium), and goat salt.

Note: Alfalfa pellets is not a big concern if you are feeding alfalfa hay.

Hope this helps!

Patrick
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok but what about corn siliage and hayliage is that any different from feeding corn and hay?
 

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Corn silage is IMO kind of a cross between corn and hay/pasture. Corn silage will provide lots of energy just like corn will.

I have no experience with haylage and would not know what to say. Sorry

Note: The thing with silage is that it molds easily. This is a big problem with goats as they are sensitive to mold. However, if you inspect the silage your feed them for mold and don't feed any moldy silage to the goats you should be alright.

Thanks,

Patrick
 

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Hello,


I'll start with soybean mill... Soybean mill has on average about 11-13% protein level. I would say that is pretty good!

Next is silage... Silage protein levels vary depending on what type it is:

Grass: On average 13% protein

Mixed (mostly grass): On average 14% protein

Mixed (mostly legume): On average 17% protein

Legume: On average 19% protein

Corn Silage: Corn silage has low levels of protein and is mainly used as a substitute for corn with more digestibility. On average 8-9% protein


Hope this helps!

Patrick
 

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Silage can be dangerous, listeria can raise it's ugly head. I advise, to not feed it, go with Alfalfa hay, you don't have to feed a lot of it, for them to benefit from it.

Corn is only best used for occasional treats, it isn't great for the only thing in their diet.
 

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Corn is not usually the best for goats. It is high in phosphorus and a "hot" food, that can cause issues in high quantities. I prefer not to have it in my grain. :)
 

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Ok so that means it is better to feed corn siliage than corn?
No, it doesn't. Corn silage is simply chopped corn - stalks, ears, leaves and all - that has been allowed to ferment. If the silage has not been put up properly it molds and can cause listeriosis in goats, which can kill them. Dry yearlings should not need grain at all unless your hay is of an inferior quality. If you are that concerned about them growing out properly get a 14% grower pellet and give them about 1/2 pound per doe per day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thats alittle hard for me as we are dairy farmers and feed is not cheap :(
 

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I know hay is not cheap, however, for the health and better and safe way, is to get them the hay, not silage.

Alfalfa is the best for them and will help with ,milk. plus, you don't have to feed as much as other hays for the same benifit.

Listeria can take them down quickly, they can die from it, if not caught early enough. :(

I am concerned with your goats and silage of any kind.
 

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If you cannot get premade feed, barley or oats would be better for them than corn. Most of the dairies here feed barley with alfalfa and oat hay. Along with a good mineral/vitamin pack of course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So I have decided to feed them a mixture of oats, molasses, and pellets how does that sound?
 

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Keep the molasses to a minimum. My preference is no molasses but plenty of people do feed grain with molasses.
 

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It is like candy for them, they do not need molasses. What kind of pellets are they? Will you be feeding hay with the grain mix?
 
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