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TKC Farms
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I fed the calves this evening I fed their normal cotton seed with a little pellets on top of it. They ate it all but a handful or two and I turn them out of the coral. I feed in the coral so when I want to catch them, it’s not a big problem to do so. When I let the goats in I forgot to remove the cotton seed. Two of my goats cleaned it out. I didn’t really think they would eat it. Any problem you see with this? It was only cotton seed that was left in trough. All the pellets were eat up by the calves.
 

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I just bought a beautiful Lamancha buck, and the feed they fed was ground cottonseed, plus grain etc. he is a fine looking 4 yr. old.
 

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They will be fine. The grain I used to feed to my kids had cotton seed in it......I only don’t feed it any more because the price jumped threw the roof. But it’s good stuff. It’s used a lot in show and dairy animals because it’s high in energy, fiber and protein.
 

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TKC Farms
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
But this is not ground feed. It is straight out of the cotton gin. Still has a few cotton fibers on it. If it's ok I might add a little to my mix when I feed. Maybe 1-1/2 can cotton seed, 1-1/2 cans alfalfa, 4 cans whole oats and 1/2 can of Boss. Think this would be ok? I mix this up for 11 goats twice a day. It might even help with the dust problem from the alfalfa causing my erratic coughing. Although it's been better last few feedings.
 

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I guess like anything, start small and work the amounts up. Are the fibers themselves digestible? I've only ever seen the ground up stuff.
 

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I guess like anything, start small and work the amounts up. Are the fibers themselves digestible? I've only ever seen the ground up stuff.
I don't know if they are digestible or not. I guess I'll have to watch the ones that ate them. The cows eat them fine but a goat maybe different?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
New info, interesting read. Maybe feed the does but not the breeding bucks. See this:

Technical Paper No. 06-11 Tuskegee UTnievcehrnsictyal Paper No. 07-08 August, 2007 Tuskegee University
FEEDING VALUE OF WHOLE COTTONSEED FOR GOATS Sandra G. Solaiman, PhD, PAS
Almost 8 million tons of cottonseeds with a product value of $800 million were produced in the U.S. in 2005. Most of the cottonseeds are produced in the South and Southeastern U.S. Texas with almost three million tons valued at $300 million lead the nation and Alabama with 275 thousand tons valued at $25 million ranked 10th in cottonseed production in 2005 (USDA-NASS). Table 1 presents top ten states in the nation producing cottonseeds.
Table 1. Top ten cottonseed producing states ____________________________________________________
Production Price/unit Value of production Thousand tons $/ton $1000
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Texas 2,868.7 101.00
Arkansas 771
Georgia 736
Mississippi 736
California 594
North Carolina 469
Tennessee 386
Louisiana 364
Missouri 285
Alabama 275
U.S. 8,172.1 __________________________________________________
Whole cottonseed, a by product of cotton industry has been used as a supplemental feedstuff for livestock for over 100 years. Whole cottonseed can be used as a practical source of supplemental protein and energy to reduce cost of production. One of the major advantages of feeding cottonseed is its reduced cost of handling and processing.


Conclusions
Whole cottonseed is a by-product of cotton industry and is produced in large quantities mainly in the Southeast and West of the U.S. It has high fat and protein contents and can increase protein and energy density of the diets for ruminants while reducing the cost of production. Inclusion of WCS at the level of 15% of the diet increased dry matter intake and gain with no adverse effects on blood metabolites and liver related enzymes. Whole cottonseed contains gossypol that at high levels (30%) increased red blood cell fragility and reduced reproductive performance of young bucks. Scrotal circumference and semen concentrations were reduced. Sperm normality and progressive motility were adversely affected, where as sperm abnormalities were increased by addition of WCS to the diets.

Whole cottonseed at 15% of the total diet can be safely used for meat goat production; however, it should not be fed or fed very sparingly to young bucks raised for breeding.
 
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