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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So a neighbor just showed us a pic of a coyote a few houses down from us. This was a BIG coyote. We haven't ever really had problems with coyotes around here, just foxes.

Since I have never really thought we had nearly wolf sized coyotes around here, I'm a little worried.

We have 6 ft welded wire fencing... and our goats are full grown (we don't have any kids). I seriously doubt a coyote could hop this fence and we've got ground staples too, so it would take some time and dedication to dig under. The goats have a shelter but I don't feel comfortable locking them up in it.

Anyone ever had a coyote problem with adult goats and good fencing?
 

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There is a coyote den within hiking distance of where I live and certain times of the year, I hear their vocalizations. This pack have another den approximately 6 miles from here also that they winter over at. The coyote have caused me no problems because they tend to stay away from the surrounding farms. There is an abundance of other types of wild creatures for them to dine on.

Free roaming domesticated dogs are another story all together. I have been forced to kill 2 within only the first few months of owning goats.

Currently, there has been another one lurking around looking for weaknesses that is causing a bit of an upset with my guys. So far, he hasn't attempted digging under, jumping over or running the fence lines. I have fired a warning shot and so far, he has stayed away for a while. The next time I spot him threaten and lurking around the goats, he will be number 3 on the mortality list.

Locking them in the barn at night is the best available defense you have against your goats becoming predator bait at this current time. Mine do not overnight in the field and are brought to dry lot every evening for protection against predator invasion. I would lock them in their stalls at night in a heart beat if necessary to keep them safe.
 

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Coyotes are opportunists. If they think they can get a goat they will.
I have seen large ones (they are crossed with dogs around here, wolves in other parts of the county) take down a full size deer (doe).

The old little coyotes (the one like foxes) are no longer around this area, we have the Coy Dogs. So far, my 6' fencing has kept them out of my barn.

Is your fence electric? That will help keep them at bay.
 

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So a neighbor just showed us a pic of a coyote a few houses down from us. This was a BIG coyote. We haven't ever really had problems with coyotes around here, just foxes.

Since I have never really thought we had nearly wolf sized coyotes around here, I'm a little worried.

We have 6 ft welded wire fencing... and our goats are full grown (we don't have any kids). I seriously doubt a coyote could hop this fence and we've got ground staples too, so it would take some time and dedication to dig under. The goats have a shelter but I don't feel comfortable locking them up in it.

Anyone ever had a coyote problem with adult goats and good fencing?
Yep, that's why I got my LGD. I thought good fencing would be enough, but after I watched them hop over the fence in broad daylight, they are not nocturnal, I decided an LGD would be my best bet. And the coyotes never jumped the fence again!
 

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@Morning Star Farm
Absolutely, coyote aren't known to be totally nocturnal and my rare sighting of a coyote has been in the daytime. However, they have positively been seen roaming at night when the heat and humidity is oppressive and during the rare deep snowfalls in my immediate area. I made it a point to actively scent track the one I saw close to my place. That is how the den was located many years ago.

Not only are my goats in dry lot at night, they are in dry lot when I am away from home for an extended amount of time. Dry lot is close to the house in the area that's tucked away and secluded. The browse field isn't, is on road frontage and the visual is not as open on that section. During the day, it's easier to be vigilant, watchful and in a position to protect when needed. Seeing shadow figures at night isn't a clear view and lots of things seem more scary when darkness falls. I like to sleep at night, so yes, if locking them in their stalls at night was necessary to keep them totally safe, would prevent me from laying awake from fretting and worrying, it would happen.

Not all goats are kept in large expansive pastures and having an LGD isn't practical for some owners situation. I have a very alert and protective natured breed of dog as a companion and personal protection dog that has been fully boundary trained. He is not left outside unsupervised and will completely put on the brakes if something needs to be discouraged out of his boundaries once he reaches the outer limits. All permanent residential members, human or not, living here fall under his reasoning as something he needs to guard. He keeps me informed and alerted to the proximity of any visiting person(s), other canines or trespassers around my entire property 24/7. He even cranks the watchful alert up a notch during the times I sleep. He is not, nor will he ever be, an LGD type dog though he keeps a watchful eye and alert ear over the goats in both the browse field and dry lot areas.
 

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We have them here. I hear them at night frequently. We have 3 pyrenees that keep them at bay. I recently had to take the youngest to the vet to get stitched up from a tousle with what I'm assuming was a coyote. If I didn't have them, I'd close the goats up in the barn at night. Coyotes are wily (just like on the cartoon) and I wouldn't trust just fencing no matter how secure it seems.
 

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I also want to point out that we're in the suburbs... a big pack would be uncommon as would a nest.
I live in the suburbs too, but we have larger lots than the typical neighborhood on my street. I'm pretty sure there's a den in my neighbors yard. There's a lot of steep terrain that most homeowners don't ever go to, plus a lot of open ranch land with in a mile or two, so plenty of secluded places for a coyote den. Plus coyotes have multiple dens within their territory, so they can move to whatever den is the best at the time. My neighbors have wildlife cameras up in the back of their property and regularly see coyotes walking through their property and mine. The animal "highway" is about 200ft from where my goats are dry lotted in 6ft woven wire fencing, and most of it has a concrete curb that nothing can dig under. Where there is no concrete, there is an apron of hardware cloth mesh, which makes it impossible for then to dig through too. The second line of defense is 2 more fences between the goats pen and the animal highway (they enclose my vegetable garden and orchard from deer) but these are not very good and there's plenty of places a coyote can pass under them. They are mainly for deer. The third line of defense is our family dog, who makes it her nightly duty to stand guard against any intruder from her post on the deck. She barks at the coyotes that go around the neighbor's yard, and I'm sure they don't appreciate the barking, but they refuse to do anything about the coyotes that live in their yard. They are so scared of the coyotes, that they won't let their dachshund out into the backyard off leash because she would be snapped up by one of the coyotes! I don't care if my barking dog wakes them up at night because it's the only non-lethal way to keep my animals safe from the coyotes.
 

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Really it’s going to depend on your areas coyotes on how much or a issue they will be. Your pen is way better then mine but my coyotes are well fed with rodents and the subdivision behind me garbage and small pets they won’t risk anything that looks like a trap......not to mention any that comes near my house is free game. But I would go ahead and put some hot fence on the outside as well. This will also help if any stray dogs come along too which IMO are worse then any wild animal. At least a wild animal will kill what it needs to survive dogs will come in and kill because it’s fun.
 

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I hate, hate, HATE coyotes! I've lost many beloved cats over the years to them. Never a goat though. I know coyotes pass through along the east side of my property, and occasionally the north edge. I have almost all my goats contained in cattle panel fencing on the north side. I know a coyote could easily go over if it wanted. For the first couple of years, my goats had no protection other than that cattle panel fence, and I never had an issue. I started breeding more does and having more kids around though, so I got a Pyrenees just for the peace of mind. And then a second one. Probably overkill, since the coyotes never actually did give me a problem with the goats, but the peace of mind has been totally worth the extra fees bill and the nightly barking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My goats’ pen is quite small, and beside the house. It’s not a big grand pasture or anything like that. I can also keep watch of it very easily.

We don’t have an LGD but do have a large dog always watching during the day, he barks at anything outside, I’m sure a coyote would take note to steer clear.

I’ll look into some electric.
 

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We have coyotes here but they've never been an issue with our goats. I'm sure a lot of it is because of the proximity to our house so in the past I didn't lock in the pygmys I had. However over the past few years bobcats have become more prolific and so our NG wethers get locked in at night. It's really the best defense for any animal if you can do it.

A bobcat will scale a fence no problem, but again, their pen being so close to the house, I don't anticipate any problems from them.
 

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We have had coyotes come up on our doorstep many times. My dad shot one from his bedroom window last year. That coyote ate seven of our kittens before Dad shot it. I know that they can get into the big goat pasture because when we butchered our six pigs, we put the hides and guts in a corner of the goat pasture and they disappeared in about two days. I am pretty sure that the goats didn't eat them.
I have never had a problem with coyotes but I do lock the goats up when they have kids.
 

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Years ago with my first flock, I had a pair of bottle babies that were adored. They were to be our herd sires. We kept them separate from the flock and they slept in the house at night. When they turned 8 weeks and we weaned them we put them in a pasture with our sweet older horse and her Alpine best friend to babysit. The next morning I went to feed and the babysitter doe looked shaken up. I called the babies and started looking for them. They had both been killed from the throat and partially nibbled on in the belly area. We had a game warden out thinking mountain lions, but it turns out it was coyotes. They never attacked a full grown (full size) adult, but we never felt they were safe if there were babies on the ground. We locked all the goats up every night in hog panel pens, except for the meanest Boer buck ever, and I secretly hoped he would get eaten. Once the coyotes figured out they could get in, they never stopped. We tried stakes, heavy logs weighing the fence down, game cams to figure out how they got in.... they even broke THROUGH welded wire field fencing. They ate all the fowl and cats they could get to, they even ate my mom’s Yorkie dog last year. My parents don’t own anything smaller than a pitbull now cause they sold it all to protect them. My current flock is without their protecting dog and so in small pens, even during the day. We see coyotes all the time out here. I haven’t had a problem with my adult Nigerians yet, but I won’t put it past them.
 
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