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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My college has a herd of goats that I was hoping to do an enrichment project on because I thought a goat would be way more fun than a cat and a dog. (I do have to touch these animals this semester for class once a week for five weeks).

Unfortunately upon closer inspection and questions, their herd is CL/CAE positive and the barn has sarcopties mange that is causing hives to appear near the goats muzzles. With 3 vets it definitely isn't ORF which is a relief.

My question is, how much bio-security will I need to work with these animals and keep my goats safe? I do have to deal with these animals multiple times and I chose to generally strip, disinfect everything, have boots and coveralls just for their facility, and try to scrub all of my skin before going to my barn. Last time I had a farm class I didn't have goats so it wasn't something of concern to me. Now I do, last night I opted to avoid touching/socializing and got the barn owner to milk/do chores in the evening so I wouldn't have to.

I was so hoping to get to teach a little goat tricks instead of a cat, but my goats health and safety come first.
 

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It may be over the top, but avoid parking your vehicle anywhere where manure may have been or will be. Bring a set of clean clothes, wear easily sanitizable shoes, or leave a pair there and slip into yours after a shower. Basic cleanliness. Shower, scrub nails, sanitize shoes, don't bring anything in/out of property, that sort of thing.
 

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Oh man, why do they continue on with such a dirty herd? Thats gross! I would go to every extreme possible in this case!
Depends what the college uses them for. Example purposes, butchering, or experimenting for knowledge. This could be a management herd, but I would be shocked just because of what's been said. None of our colleges in WI would allow as such.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Honestly I think on some level it is so that people become exposed to what is out there. Anything leaving the facility is dead, so they are not worried about the goats themselves transmitting the diseases, and I'd say over 99.5% of the students or higher won't touch another livestock animal within a month of handling these animals. I just live close enough to commute and decided to get into goats...
 

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I think having diseased goats is brilliant, actually. It's the best way to learn. No? Book learning only takes one so far. Learning to clean an abscess within bio security measures, trying to cure mange, and seeing what CAE does to a goat, all best first hand.

All the measures to keep you clean have been mentioned. It's all the same stuff you'd have to do if you were a traveling vet. hit the property with coveralls and boots specific to the job. Leaving the farm, disinfect or remove what's pertinent.
 

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Yikes...that is not a good situation. I personally don't think I'd be able to work around diseased goats knowing I have to go home to my healthy goats. You can only do so much to prevent diseases from spreading, but you never know when it could be tracked home and spread to your herd. It doesn't take much.
 

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I agree with the above two... I wouldn't be able to do that... I would be to worried.. Like Kylee said.. It doesn't take much...
 

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I think that this is a brilliant idea. I totally agree with AmyBoogie. CL can only be passed through open abscess so your good there unless you touch the pus and then go touch your goat or if they get it internally and cough on you. CAE is only spread through bodily fluids I believe, so you should be good there too. Now mange is a different story. I would wash up really good after touching them, maybe even getting a shower. just use common sense and every thing you know about keeping diseases from spreading.
 

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Honestly, I think this is less dangerous than doing shows. At a show I don't always know which herd has disease or if someone has been through and sent home after popping an abscess on the ground. In a situation like the school, I would know the score, so I could take the proper precautions to keep my home herd safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have been going to my parents house as an intermediate ground and using their house as a biohazard zone. Stripping/showering and disinfecting. :)

Cars are parked on pavement toward the west side of the building, pastures, tractors, and entryway of animals are all on the east side.

Thanks for all the advice everyone!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just out of curiosity how is this more dangerous than showing with possibly infected goats? In this case I am the only vector between the two, whereas at shows both the infected goats and your goats are in much closer proximity and come into contact with a lot more possibly contaminated surfaces?
 

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Being paranoid, I wouldn't do it, but if I did I would take all the measures suggested. Some of these diseases have the ability to take down your herd.
 

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Shows can be risky as well, but not the same as being around a "herd", that is known "contaminated".

Most show animals, don't have diseases, but some may.

CAE isn't contagious,like CL. If the goat isn't in milk ect At shows, that is not an issue there.

It is the matter of knowing, a "herd" is contagious rather than, going to a show, in hopes of not contaminating your herd. By doing so and in most cases, the goat is just fine. Yes, there is risk in all we do, but, it is another thing, to mess with a whole herd that has issues, then, going home to a clean herd and missed one thing, then contaminate your own goats. :( There is a big difference there, in actuality. It is being "exposed" to it big time, because it is all over the place.

I seen your concern with contamination, when you made this Topic post, so, you must know the risk involved here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
At this time none of the does are lactating.

None of the goats have exterior abscesses that we worked with either. Besides the pus what other means of contamination for CL are there? Could they have internal abcesses? None of the goats are coughing, so airborne is hopefully limited?

We finished the last day of goats. Now have a week of sheep and then chickens.
 

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The puss remains in the ground, walls, feeders, waters, wood, ect, anywhere touched, if allowed to erupt on it's own. I hear, without proper cleaning of all area's exposed, it can remain a threat for a very long time, even (years).

All it takes is for a goat to touch the goo, no matter where it is, then, it can be spread. Even though those goats do not have abscesses at the moment, doesn't mean, they are not carriers.
You never know when they will erupt. And sometimes you may not see one, until it is too late.

Yes, it can get into organs, which will eventually kill the goat and if it is in their lungs, they will spread it that way, through coughing.

I as a breeder, am so careful to keep a clean herd.
 
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