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I am very interested in this subject and wanted to get some more opinions on it. Obviously, doing your own fecals helps you have a better idea of who are the thriftiest, hardiest goats in your herd. If you have an animal who is always having a high worm count, looking and producing poorly and needing constant worming, the easiest decision would be to get her out of your herd, however you want to do that. At the opposite end of the spectrum, you have the animal who never needs worming and is in great condition. It would also be an easy decision to decide to keep her. But what about the animal with a high worm count who is in great condition? Her body can tolerate more worms, so she is a hardy goat, but would you be worried about her shedding parasites to the other goats? I'd be interested to hear some thoughts about what people would do if they had a goat like that. Keep or cull?
 

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I probably wouldn't cull immediately, because high egg counts can vary through the year.

Worms aren't continuously shedding eggs, so maybe the problem wouldn't be that particular goat, but all the goats are wormy and just shedding unevenly.

If it is consistent, though, yes, I'd cull. I don't want all those eggs on my land.
 

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I’d try everything I could to boost immunity.

Then I would take my most unthrifty and least-resistant and group them together and dry lot them apart from the rest of the herd.

I don’t cull, I wouldn’t ever.

I wouldn’t be breeding them though, so in a way I’d cull the genetics. Not everyone has a wallet that can afford keeping goats that aren’t breeding for you, so I guess, after all immunity boosting has been tried, if you wish to cull it’s your goats your choice.

I would probably test the lines though, to see if they end up producing weaker kids. They may produce kids with just fine parasite resistance. And then I would dry lot and still breed them.
 

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I can understand your desire to breed for resistance to parasites. We all (goat keepers) wish that there was some way to determine if one goat is able to resist and or tolerate worms loads better than others. We have 6 does, 2 older does and 4 two year old does. The 2 older does seem to be able to maintain a better body condition than the younger does. We do our best to maintain the same lever of care for all 6 goats. However 2 of the younger does (which happen to be off springs of the older does) have a more difficult time keeping good body weight. So I don't think that offsprings from more resistance parents will guarantee offsprings with the same abilities. I believe it is a more individual trait than anything else.
 

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:up: That makes a lot of sense. Many things affect parasite tolerance.
 
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