Cyote scare

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by RPC, Mar 10, 2010.

  1. RPC

    RPC Boer Goat Breeder

    Alright so I live around lots of cyotes and the other night they were right behind my barn while I was at work and my mom had to move the goats to an indoor pen. Now I have been putting them outside and bringing them in everynight which sucks because I want them to be able to enjoy the nice weather we are having. My question is does anyone know how high a cyote can jump. We have 5 foot high fences, I understand they can dig but can they jump that high? What is there really to do to keep them away? We dont have a gun and we only own 5 acers they mainly live in the neighbors woods. The neighbors like them so I can't really get someone to shot them if they are on their property, because they won't give permission. So what should I do?
     
  2. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    I think animals like that can climb fences, dont know for sure though, no coyotes here.

    maybe try a strand of hot wire if at all possible, otherwise i think it's safest to keep them indoors at night.
     

  3. Mouse

    Mouse New Member

    7
    Mar 3, 2010
    Texas
    Definitely better safe than sorry! We have a lot of coyote issues here, and they find a way through if they're hungry enough. Whether or not they can climb it depends on the sort of fence it is - they can't jump the full 5 feet without at least scrambling over, though. Maybe your neighbors should feed them, so they aren't a threat to livestock, if they like them so much :sigh:
     
  4. bleatinghearts

    bleatinghearts New Member

    514
    Feb 26, 2010
    Fairbanks, AK
    Katrina and Mouse are right. Electric fence on the outside of your goat yard is a great idea. Is your ground real dry with high snow? If so, your ground won’t be so good. With any electric fence, the animal needs to be trained to understand it. The wire should be at nose level with that sort of animal and it might be helpful if you attached a pop can with just a little bit of bacon grease or something similar to the wire (with wire) NOT to bait it in to your property, but to bring it to the wire/bait after its already close to your goats. This way the animal learns real fast what being next to your goat fence feels like.
    I totally understand that we want our animals to be able to enjoy the space we have made for them, but, there are too many critters out there, large and small, that want our animals (or gardens) and are very ambitions in their attempts to get them. I can’t let our chickens out with our goats because of the flying predators. I put electric fence around the meatbirds and pig enclosure so that the fox, martin, my sled dogs, neighbor dogs, or whatever else is out there cant get them. (Neighbor had his pigs eaten by a bear a few years ago) Then we hope that the moose don’t get too close to the house so that they don’t get the garden. One great big circle of who gets what for dinner and I plan on being the one with the full freezer! :p
     
  5. WarPony

    WarPony New Member

    Jan 31, 2010
    Michigan
    A row of electric set back a foot or two from the outside of the fence, as long as it has enough juice running through it, usually helps. If it is right up against the fence they can often get over it to climb the fence, if it is nose height but right up against your actual fence they can still dig under, too. They are super smart little beasties. Some bacon grease smeared on a jar lid and wired to the fence so it lures them in and then zaps the packin' out of them is a good idea. Gotta teach them that the wire is hot and to stay away.


    I had a lot of trouble with them harassing my mini horses until i got my Gypsy horse out here and he attacked one. Left hair and blood in the paddock! They don't come anywhere near our place anymore, thank goodness. Stray dogs stay away as well. cats too. Brego just doesn't like predators invading his territory.
     
  6. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Do you have any way of putting up a motion sensing flood light? Most of the time, a sudden light up of the area will keep them away....that and having a dog close enough to the goats that their barking alerts you and chases off the coyotes
     
  7. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
    Coyotes can clear a 6 ft fence like it isn't there.... I've seen them do it. They are SMART!!! My neighbor looses his sheep and some lambs to coyotes every year. I've lost a ton of chickens, guineas, pheasant and chukar to them.... but no goats because my LGD's are in there!!! LOL Now I let one LGD roam most nights.... saves the birds too.
     
  8. DebMc

    DebMc Member

    845
    Dec 10, 2009
    Despite what you hear, coyotes *can* scale a 6 ft block wall and *dig* under a fence, too. In fact, they burrow out dens to raise their young. I constantly hear stories of how coyotes can't and won't dig - baloney! That's an urban legend. We have had good luck w/5' commercial grade chain link fencing.

    We live in the foothills of the Sonoran Desert and every night are serenaded and visited by gobs of coyotes, competing packs, with their yipping, yapping and howling. A horse north of us was taken down by a pack in broad daylight, and they are drawn to our property by scent and sound of all our animals, which are housed in separately fenced interior yards inside a 5' chain link parameter fence and locked up in fully enclosed predator-proof pens at night. We've lived here 8 years and during that time not once has a coyote breeched our parameter fence to gain access to any of our fenced yards or animals. Yet they are out there every night, on the unfenced portion of our property, salivating over the scent of waterfowl, chicken, turkey and goats! :shocked:

    It'd be even better to go w/6' commercial chain link and then top it w/coyote roller bars. Google that to see how to make them. It's relatively inexpensive and can be used to predator-proof (terrestial not aerial) about fencing 5' or taller.

    Deb Mc
     
  9. DebMc

    DebMc Member

    845
    Dec 10, 2009
    Oops! Forget to mention that we made sure to install the chain link so the bottom guide wire was at ground level, leaving no gap, then we lined the entire fence parameter w/boulders plus in some areas also buried chicken wire 2' down into the ground as a barrier to guard against predators digging in. It was alot of work but well worth the effort. And we don't lose any sleep worrying about whether our animals are safe.

    Deb Mc
     
  10. WarPony

    WarPony New Member

    Jan 31, 2010
    Michigan
    Around here they swear up and down coyote won't attack a horse. Bullpooey! "They are timid lone hunters, and won't try to attack a horse because they can't take it down alone" they say. When they were harassing my minis the county ag agent tried to tell me that. I said, "Wait, these are mini horses, about the same size as a goat. Are you honestly telling me they will kill a goat but not a horse the same size just because it is a horse?" He swore up and down that no coyote has ever attacked a horse, any attacks HAD to be domestic dogs, not coyotes, because coyotes are too timid. *rolls eyes*
     
  11. bleatinghearts

    bleatinghearts New Member

    514
    Feb 26, 2010
    Fairbanks, AK
    Very excited to look into roller bars. People come up with the coolest ideas!
     
  12. redsticker

    redsticker Member

    115
    May 7, 2009
    SE Louisiana
    We just moved to this property last summer so we have limited experience with coyotes, but they make me nervous too. Our neighbors have lived here their whole lives and swear that the one coyote we saw is the only one that ever comes around a couple times a year, but I'm afraid that if he figures out there's a food source, chickens and goats (which we don't have yet, but will soon), that he'll come back with friends for a snack. We have a gun, but no dog.

    We'll probably lose more animals to hawks though considering we have at least three that live near our house... (Can see the nest from here.) They hunt the wild rabbits that come graze in our pastures.
     
  13. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Everyone has great advice... :thumbup: :greengrin:

    If you are able to get a couple of LGD's ...it will keep them away.... The reason I say 2 is..... a pack of coyotes... will take a LGD away from the herd....while another coyote...grabs an animal....they are very crafty....so if you have at least 2 LGD's... the coyotes... will be less likely ...to come take a animal..... :wink:
     
  14. 7acreranch

    7acreranch New Member

    140
    Mar 8, 2010
    Eastern OK
    We have some coyotes but our biggest problem are dogs that have packed up. We only have 1 LGD but we also have a "house" dog, they are good at alerting us of any problems. We haven't lost any but they have lost a few. Usually turning on the lights scares most away. I also think the bark of Tiny our Great Pry does a good job. One thing to do is check with the local game and wildlife office sometimes they will place traps for you. If the neighbors like them then remind them that as "pet" owners/caretakers they are responsible for any damage done by them. Are they considered a nuisance animal in your area if they are then hunting them on your property is not a problem as long as the blood trail starts on your property. I don't want to bring this up but I would not have any livestock without a firearm at least in the house. Kidding season will bring them closer remember to clean up any scents they can pick up.If one does get in the wire it generally does not leave.
     
  15. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    reading all these stories and wow! :shocked:

    thank goodness there' no coyotes here! occansional bear, and tons of moose but...wow! i would be scared to try and keep my animals safe.
     
  16. WarPony

    WarPony New Member

    Jan 31, 2010
    Michigan
    Coydogs are worse than coyotes OR dogs.

    We do have a much bigger problem with packs of pet dogs running loose, but I got a reputation as a dog shooter. I never said i shot any dogs, I just acted like maybe I had and let them think i did... "Have i seen your dog? NOOOoooooooo I haven't seen your dog in weeks... shoot it? ME? NOOOOooo I would NEEEVER do that!" *real sarcastic tone and smarty pants attitude*... and now folks are better about keeping their dogs at home. I would shoot one if i absolutely had no other choice but aside from a really sick stray I've never had to go beyond trapping them and calling animal control.


    But coydogs are just NASTY! they have the strength and brains of the coyote but lack any fear of humans and tend to pack up and get really aggressive. they also tend to get the playful nature of dogs and they WILL hunt and kill just for fun.
     
  17. RPC

    RPC Boer Goat Breeder

    Thanks everyone I got some AWESOME feed back. I guess we will just keep doing what we are doing. It may be a hassel but the goats are safe and that is the number one priority. I always knew we had cyotes but never thought they really came up to the house. My mom said they did this a couple years ago around this time, they were even on our deck one night, but once summer hits and food is plentiful they stop coming close to the house so that is nice. But I still prob. won't leave them out just to be safe.
     
  18. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Around here, I've heard them but haven't seen any....there are too many gut piles from hunting season and road kill carcasses of deer to keep them fed.
     
  19. DebMc

    DebMc Member

    845
    Dec 10, 2009
    We have gobs more coyotes but free roaming domestic dogs have been our biggest problem, too. Folks move out here from the city and think it's okay to let their dogs run free. They end up down here harrassing our stock and our animal control (Maricopa County, AZ) will not respond unless the dog has bitten a human and then, only then they refer your complaint over to the sheriff's office - good ole' Sheriff Joe - and if you're really lucky a deputy *might* drop by a day or week later, usually in the middle of the night, to take a report and that's when I point out the perp aka dawg is history as they're a day late and a brain short and or as useful and helpful as an electric applicance with no electrity. So please go!!! Consequently, if I can, I now trap the dog (bait it into a large wire crate or into a dead space fenced area we have) and go directly to the owner and tell them to come get the GD dog *immediately* or it won't be coming home, reminding them of the leash law and my right to protect my stock. I don't have a gun but they don't know that. :ROFL: I love dawgs; it's the irresponsible owner that rankles my hide. :hair:

    Deb Mc
     
  20. bleatinghearts

    bleatinghearts New Member

    514
    Feb 26, 2010
    Fairbanks, AK
    Deb (and anyone like Deb, which might include me too) You have got a very gracious attitude. I too love dogs. I have nine that mean the world to me. It is not a dog’s fault that it wants to eat chicken, or chase an animal like a goat that flees when frightened and ruff it up or kill it. IT’S A DOG!
    Thing is, the folks that let their dogs roam are either totally naive or they just don’t give a rip. Most of the time, it’s that they just don’t care and that’s why we sometimes have to make the hard decision when it comes to protecting our own. If we get animal control involved, it’s probably not going to help in the long run. The owners just don’t care. I feel so sorry that a dog gets shot for doing DOG things, but I am 100% behind anyone who needs to protect their family, human or animal.
    Where I live, no one calls animal control. Dogs just don’t come home.