Dairy donkey??

Discussion in 'Dairy Diaries' started by rebelshope, Jun 12, 2009.

  1. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    Okay I am sure that this belongs in the "other" catagory, but it is a dairy question of sorts.

    Long story made short. I have a donkey jenny who had a colt on April 1. I bought her not realizing that she should really still have her colt on her. I thought the colt was older and weaned. Anyway- she has a rock hard bag. I milked her a little, just to soften the teats. I feel so bad for her. What is the best way to dry her off?

    I may go back and get the colt. I am so upset about this right now, but I may not be able to get the colt until Sun. if I do.
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    oh thats sad - yah I would get teh colt as he could easily be missing his mom - poor thing.

    As to what to do for her in teh mean time - if she lets you milk her I would this will keep her comfortable and producing milk until you get teh colt.

    thats what I would do :shrug:
     

  3. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    She will let me milk her, better than my goats, I don't even have to tie her up. I milked her out a little and sprayed her udder with peppermint. I hope that will make her a little more comfortable.
     
  4. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    thats real good.

    So would you get to keep teh colt or just keep him till he is weaned?
     
  5. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    it's great that she'll get her colt back, she must have been uncomfortable, great job! :thumb:
     
  6. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Yeah, you're definately going to want to get that colt back. He shouldn't be weaned until he's at least 3 1/2 months. I leave my paint foals on their dams til they're 5 to 6 months though. Also, when you wean you're going to want to keep him in a pen near his mom for a couple weeks until he leaves. It can really hurt the colt emotionally if he's not weaned properly which can make them harder to handle, train, etc. Hope you can get him back. :hug:
     
  7. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I agree with the others... :wink: ..So glad ..she was relieved....poor girl.....I am glad.. that things should be OK ....................being a easy milker is impressive .....what a good girl... :hug:
     
  8. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    Thank you for your support. I was really distraught about this whole situation. If I had known that she had a 2.5 month colt on her I would have never taken her. I was livid when I figured it out. it was a fluke really.

    Mama and baby are reunited. The woman was not very nice about it, offered me a deal in the first place if I took both, but I didn't want the colt until I realized how young he was. So I paid her more than was she originally offered him to me for. When I got up there she kept saying that he was eating only hay, sweet feed, and water. Only drinking once in awhile off of mom. BS. The first thing that colt did after he looked around was start to drink, then went to the other side and drank there, then came back to the 1st side. I had sprayed her udders with peppermint before I even got him so I bet he thought he was getting quite a treat.

    The place, oh. . . I just don't want to tell you about and defiantly you wouldn't want to hear about the goats. Oh and she is trying to raise tiny tiny goats. Only wants the smallest goats she can find. She thought my 24 in doe was too big. I would never have sold my doe to her after I saw her place.

    Anyway thank you again for your support maybe tonight I can sleep.
     
  9. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    well you saved the little guy and mom from the situation and you will have some happy donkey's because of it.

    Can you train him to be a guard donkey? i hear if they are raised with goats and gelded the jacks are good protectors
     
  10. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    That is so nice of you to do that! I'm sure momma and baby are much happier. The lady sounds like someone who shouldn't be owning animals!
     
  11. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    well not owing animals might be a stretch but some edjucation might be good
     
  12. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    I keep trying to tell myself that. She honestly didn't think that the jack, who is now Dominick ( as in Dominick the Italian Christmas Donkey- the cutest Christmas song ever) was not drinking milk anymore. Poor dear has been drinking since I got him back here. Everytime I check on him he is getting another drink.
     
  13. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    well being gone from mom makes the milk taste so much better and he wants to make sure he is nursing all the time so he doesnt miss out
     
  14. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    This is a pic she sent me before I got them, I will have to get a new one, but here is the happy fam.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    How hard are donkeys to care for in comp to goats? And are they any louder than a Nubian doe screamin MAAAAAA!!!Thx ahead. We are kinda interested in one as a pet/protector
     
  16. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    WOW theyre adorable. :greengrin:
     
  17. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    Thanks everyone

    Jason, they are easy but different. You would need to educate yourself on how to feed them, what to look for in diseases, and general care. Just like goats, they have to have have their hooves trimmed. You could eventually do their hooves on your own but would need help learning. You also have to learn about how to handle one. They are different in their handling than a horse. If a donkey doesn't understand, it just stands there. So learning how to work with one is sometimes an experiment in patience.

    They are loud. I jumped the first several time I heard Sophie bray, now that she has her baby she is much better. Normally they bray when it is feeding time but are otherwise quiet, unlike my goats that bleat whenever they see me.

    If you have more specific questions I would be happy to answer them.
     
  18. BeeLady

    BeeLady New Member

    Very cute donkeys!
     
  19. RowdyKidz

    RowdyKidz Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2009
    NW Ohio
    They're adorable!!! :love:
     
  20. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    THanks. . . .

    They are kept with the goats at night right now and they have had an interesting effect on them. The big goats heed to them, but the little goats are more comfortable so the little goats now have a leg up in getting food.

    The goats can get away from the donkeys ,they have a structure to jump on.