Define Moonspots....

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by 4hmama, Mar 18, 2009.

  1. 4hmama

    4hmama New Member

    467
    Jan 9, 2009
    No. Central WV
    I am trying to wrap my brain around the definition of moon spots.... According to one website, the definition of Moon Spots is "random spots of any color superimposed over a coat of any color". How do you decide if markings are 'moon spots' or just random markings? The site I got this from is http://www.americangoatsociety.com/ND%2 ... tterns.htm . Some moon spots are very obvious, but others - not so much (to me anyway). How do you guys decide?? :shrug:
     
  2. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California

  3. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    So moon spots are a color on a color? Kinda like a frosting with the other color below? I have never understood moon spots :greengrin:
     
  4. 4hmama

    4hmama New Member

    467
    Jan 9, 2009
    No. Central WV
    Thanks TGB - that site helped. If I understand correctly, moonspots are only found on 'colored' goats - since white based goats can't have moonspotting...right?
     
  5. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    your welcome... :) ..hopefully someone will come along ...to answer all the questions about them.....I wish I could help....but I am not sure...?
     
  6. HollowbeadRanch

    HollowbeadRanch New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    NW Alabama
    Yes, this is what I have been told... HOWEVER... you have to look closely at a goat that you assume is white. I had a Doe that looked white until she shed off in the summer and she was actually a REALLY light creme color... she had LOTS of moonspots AND passed them to her daughter. So you have to look closely. I have also been told that a goat can have as little as TWO HAIRS that are a moonspot and still pass them, but one of the parents have to have moonspots in order for them to be passed to the offspring. It is not a thing where they can have it in their bloodlines and still pass it... they must have moonspots themselves to pass it. That website Pam posted for you is actually for a lady here in South Alabama who raises moonspotted Fainters! She is the one that got me started out looking for moonspotted Nigies after MANY emails between the two of us, very nice lady! Tina (Laurel_Haven) on here also has ALOT of moonspots in her herd, so if she sees this post I am sure she will add some more info to what I have listed about :thumbup: I hope this helps some! :wink:
     
  7. Haviris

    Haviris Member

    430
    Oct 7, 2007
    I think moonspots are alittle hard to really define I always kind of thought they were something you just get an eye for. I did have two does last year that had spots that had me wondering, if either of their parents had been moonspotted I wouldn't even question it, but to my knowledge they aren't! And I don't know that any of their Grandparents are either (in case they could have such a small one or even a few tiny hairs that were), anyway here are the spots (these two are sisters)
    [​IMG]
    And on this one I only found it after I shaved her, you couldn't see it after the hair grew back.
    [​IMG]
    So are these moonspots? I have no idea! I sold their mom and they are the only kids I got out of her, I still own their dad and none of his other kids seem to be moonspotted (he would seem easier for moonspots to hide on) I lost the second one just before she turned 6 months old, the other one is grown now and recently had her first kids, one is covered in moonspots, but she was bred to a moonspotted buck so I still have no idea. I'm not even sure you can still see the spot, I'll have to look her over when I go and feed, I might have to shave her when it warms up enough just to see!

    Anyway I just don't think they are that easy to define, in a way people would understand. I've seen people post pics of their goats and talk about their moonspots when I don't see any!? I usually assume you just can't see them in the pics, but sometimes I wonder if they are just talking about the normal white markings?!

    I also think a solid white goat can be moonspotted, a solid white paint horse is genetically a colored horse even if you can't see the color because is covered in white (think of it as a white spot that covers the entire horse), so why can't moonspots be covered in white?
     
  8. Jenna

    Jenna New Member

    667
    Jan 7, 2009
    This is very interesting... I think both spots are but I am not certain, Anyone else know?? I have a similar spot on one of my animals..Oh, their coloring is very flashy!!
     
  9. critterhavenfarm

    critterhavenfarm Guest

    66
    Feb 18, 2009
    My new baby....THESE are moonspots... :) Hubby said looks like he stood under the tar bucket...drip, drip, drip!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Susan
     
  10. Haviris

    Haviris Member

    430
    Oct 7, 2007
    If either parent was moonspotted I wouldn't even question it, but it does seem odd that both kids in the same litter has suspected moonspots! If this computer wouldn't close my page I'd post a pic of the black doe's kid, she's covered in moonspots! BUT she is by a moonspotted buck. Next year I'm planning to breed her to Mighty who is solid red, so we'll see!

    I have a black nubian that was out of two heavily spotted parents, he appears solid black but as a kid he had a very small (like maybe 8 hairs) group of red hairs next to his spine, I always wondered if that may have been a tiny moonspot. I wethered him so we'll never know for sure!

    That little moonspotted boy is adorable! And he does look like he stood under the tar bucket, even how they seem to have landed on him! Lone Star's doe kid's spots are silver, she has one that completely covers her tail, I always think it's neat to see how they mark up!
     
  11. 4hmama

    4hmama New Member

    467
    Jan 9, 2009
    No. Central WV
    So - some people are saying that one or both parents MUST have moonspots in order for offspring to have them...others are saying that they have had moonspotted babies when parents may not have had them. ARGH! Any geneticists out there?? I don't know about you guys, but I like answers that are black or white - these answers that fall into the 'shades of gray' catagory - drive me nuts until I can find an answer.

    By the way - I want the tar baby! :shades:
     
  12. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    the genetics are that one or both parents must express moonspots to be able to pass on moonspots. Sometimes the moonspots are not visible or are as tiny as acouple hairs.

    A kid can not get moonspots if the parents do not have moonspots.

    The same goes for the blue eyed gene.
     
  13. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    At least one of the parents MUST have moonspots to pass them to their kids. If you don't see any on a doe or buck, but their kids are getting moonspots, then they are hidden on the parents, it could be just a few hairs. Sometimes you don't think about their being a tiny little moonspot under their armpit, fetlock, chin, etc.

    I have a doe that has just a couple teenie moonspots on her back, that would be hard to confirm as moonspots, but her sire also had a few tiny moonspots, and then I have a buck that has pretty big blobby moonspots and he's passing them to 50% of his kids this year!