Dehorning wire saw

Discussion in 'Beginners Goat Raising' started by bigz48877, Oct 9, 2017.

  1. bigz48877

    bigz48877 Active Member

    148
    Oct 17, 2016
    Hey every we bought a registered Nigerian dwarf buck his name is Dusty and he's about 6 months old.

    The lady we bought him from told us he has not disbudded properly and he has more than just the typical scurs growing that fall off. They are growing at weird angle and we will need to cut them off.
    She told us to buy a dehorning wire saw and cut the horns off.

    Have any of you guys used a dehorning wire saw? How far do I need to cut down? What the dangers if I hit a vein?
     
  2. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    Some of my dairy bucks have scurs that tend to grow into the head. I got wire survival saws at Walmart in the camping section.

    Another kind are obstetrical saws that are used to cut up dead unborn calves (usually). Any livestock supply place would sell them. PBS, Jeffers, etc. are the online livestock supply places I use.

    They are thin wire (piano wire) that have a ring or small handle on each end to saw back and forth and they cut quite well. Pull with steady pressure, but not super hard or the wire will break. The Walmart ones are only a few dollars. I got a bunch! The first time we broke 4 on one buck. Hubby pulled too hard.

    You have to totally immobilize your goat's head.
     

  3. bigz48877

    bigz48877 Active Member

    148
    Oct 17, 2016
    Ok I found a dehorning wire saw on eBay with handles and 40 feet of wire for $20. My real concern is making the goat bleed. Did your goat bleed? Do I just remove the very tip of the scur?
     
  4. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    It will depend on the horn on how much blood but you will probably get some blood. My first disbudding was not good! The does horn still looked like a horn just grew slower and went down and eventually against her face. I don't use wire saws, I tried it once on a cow I had and once it hit blood it froze up. I was already nervous about doing it and that just made it worse. Anyways on the cow and the goat I used tree loppers. I swore that goats horn was going to bleed like crazy so I had my disbudding iron heater and a bunch of flour. It bled but hardly!! I was shocked.
    For me I took the horn right off on both of them. I wanted it over and done with and not have to worry about again for at least a few years. You can take little by little off if you want but since he is a buck always pestering him might make him a bit mean. My doe was ticked at me for a few days then she was over it!
     
  5. bigz48877

    bigz48877 Active Member

    148
    Oct 17, 2016
    The lady we bought our buck from said that a dehorning wire saw will heat up as you cut it off and cauturize the wound. Not sure if that is true or not. So I might be better off using tree trimmers?
     
  6. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    Cauterization is good for a wound, it applies heat and helps to stop the bleeding. I do use hoof trimmers on my wether's scurs, but they are small and loose. You do have to be careful, whatever you do, to not cut too far back and cause a lot of bleeding.
     
  7. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    That's why I tried the saw with that cow I was told that it would burn it as it cut as well. You can still use the saw I would just have the loppers close by just in case. That was such a mess with that poor cow and I won't try it again but there are people that have had luck. Maybe hers was just too big around? I don't really know
     
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  8. mariarose

    mariarose Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2014
    SouthCentralKY, USA
    Hi again Big Z. So glad to hear you found a good buck.

    Yeah, scurs can put you on the "horns of a dilemma" (sorry, could not resist)

    My question to the person you bought from would be...If it was so easy/simple to deal with, why did you not deal with it before you sold him to me?

    Goat horns are not simple/easy, and goat scurs are less so. Might I suggest you consult your vet? You don't have to follow his advice, but it would be good to know what it is, since he can see the scurs (in detail, up close) and we can not.

    Good luck, and as always, we are here for you.
     
  9. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    We only cut back as far as we can, a little at a time until we see a little blood. But, the wire did seem to cauterize it. (And I had the disbudder ready!)

    I've never tried to cut back to the head.
     
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