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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking into getting into the dhir program next year and doing the owner sampler but I'm curious since I believe they need to be in milk 240 days or 305 days. Does this mean I have to pull kids and bottle feed them? Also I keep seeing DCR what does this mean?
 

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Are you going for milk star or AR? For AR they have to have 8 tests, which is basically a minimum of 240 days when you test monthly. You only have to weigh and sample milk monthly-I know a couple breeders that dam raise and just separate moms and kids on test day. One of the breeders offered bottles to the kids during those monthly tests, but I think most of the kids refused the bottle anyway.
DCR is Data Collection Record or something like that. It is determined by the type of test plan you do, and the amount of tests you’ve done. It goes up with each test, and the VT is worth a certain amount of points towards it, too.
 

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There is no set amount of days you have to keep them in milk, it’s just what you hope to get from testing. You’ll have to keep them in milk long enough to get the production they need for stars, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I'm really just looking to get their milk stars. Do you still have to be part of DHI to do a one day test for a milk star?
 

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I can't help with the one-day test. I'm on OS 40 and qualified for ST last year and am trying for AR this year. If all you want is the stars, then the ST plan is good enough. For the ST testing, there is no set number of days you have to milk, but your DCR must be 75 or greater. DCR stands for Data Correction Rating and is basically the accuracy/trustworthiness of your data. It goes up each time you test, and the verification test will bump it up even more. ADGA had a little leeway in working with the DCR- my does earned their stars last year with only 6 tests, but that's about the minimum you can get away with. (I wasn't able to start testing until they were over 100 days in milk, which messed up a lot of things.)

You do not need to pull kids and bottle feed but you will need to pull them on test day, which is usually once a month.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thank for the help I guess I was thinking you have to milk everyday after freshening and write it all down on a barn sheet but makes since if you only have to test once a month you just need to pull the kids that day. So much to learn about all of this. One thing I don't under understand is how the know the pounds of milk, butterfat, ect. Do they just use the test and assume this is how much milk they make a day say 3 pounds so 3 pounds a day 200 days in milk would be 600lbs.
 

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They extrapolate. They use the data provided for the tests and use it to fill in the blanks. It's not as simple as saying "Doe A milked 2.5 lbs at day 100 and 2.3 lbs on day 130 so from day 100-130 we'll assume she milked 2.5 lbs each day." I don't know what kind of formula they use but it's a much more complex process than that. But as the herd owner, all you need to worry about is the weights and samples on each test day, and the DRPC (data records processing center) will figure out the rest. The more tests you do, the more data there will be and the more accurate the estimations will be (hence why your DCR will increase) but you can't do tests more than every 16 days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
All good info I typical dam raise 8 to 12 weeks and then milk after that. Ill look into it some more I wish I could find someone local to help me with a first time.
 

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I am on OS40 and have been for a few years. I always aim for 240 on ours (actually aim for 305 but minimum 240) but I like the long-term data.

I personally weigh my milk daily but we milk twice a day regardless (we use all the milk) but it's not needed at all. I do dam raise some kids. When I do, I plan mom's test for at least 4 weeks fresh. I will offer a bottle but if they don't take it, they have hay and grain or alfalfa pellets available. They were fine for 24 hours. Super hungry but good. After that, the next test is usually 8 weeks so no big deal holding for 24 hours. I've only found the first test of the season to be the most issue concerning dam-raised kids. But they're usually eating solids by then so if they don't take the milk, they're ok.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Just looking into things more it looks like I would need to do owner sampler ar becuase I want the stars to be shown on the pedigrees. Same with the one day milking competition the earn a star award but won't go on the pedigrees.
 

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Just looking into things more it looks like I would need to do owner sampler ar becuase I want the stars to be shown on the pedigrees. Same with the one day milking competition the earn a star award but won't go on the pedigrees.
ST will show up on pedigrees. The only difference is it will show AR and the year they made AR underneath their name. Here are two pedigrees I have. One doe I had her dam on AR and ahe earned her star....this is how it shows up. I searched another of my pedigrees and found one that was just ST.

Grey Font Handwriting Pattern Paper
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Font Automotive exterior Bumper Auto part Number
 

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You can always sign up for AR and then if you have to quit before 240 days but your does still qualify, you'll still be eligible for the ST star. Like Jubilee said, the star will show up on the pedigree no matter which plan you're on.
 

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Yep, all star requires is meeting the minimum production amounts.

I always plan to milk until 305. However, we do tend to fall short on some does. Just depends on breedings and timing and life. I try at minimum to do 240 just because it gives me a clear view of their curve, but even then, I think I'll have one dry this year that won't even meet that. But I still got good data!
 
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