The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,342 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Did you know that goats in the wild, like any other wild animal, almost never wait till they are a year to breed? When does are ready the lead buck - who head butted every buck out of the way - will mate with them. Also fatalities from birth complications are far lower than domesticated goats?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
Did you know that goats in the wild, like any other wild animal, almost never wait till they are a year to breed? When does are ready the lead buck - who head butted every buck out of the way - will mate with them. Also fatalities from birth complications are far lower than domesticated goats?
I did, actually know that. That is also why I wasn’t too worried when my year old doe bred with my young buck. I did not know, however, that the birth complications are lower. Why is that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,342 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Because undomesticated goats are free rangers. So their bodies get so used to what the environment throws at them and they dont get the "toxins" that domesticated goats get in. For example mountain goats dont eat imported grasses. We forget that when land is cultivated we take away what was there and replace allot with what we want there. So what is there is actually not as naturally occuring as we think. Its the same as when foreign animals are introduced to an area that you wont find them in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
Because undomesticated goats are free rangers. So their bodies get so used to what the environment throws at them and they dont get the "toxins" that domesticated goats get in. For example mountain goats dont eat imported grasses. We forget that when land is cultivated we take away what was there and replace allot with what we want there. So what is there is actually not as naturally occuring as we think. Its the same as when foreign animals are introduced to an area that you wont find them in.
Ah, I see. That makes a lot of sense. Is there a way to get the “toxins” out of domestic goats?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,714 Posts
I would assume it's also because the goats who have birth complications die off and don't get to contribute to the gene pool...also, wild animals don't get overfed, get lots of exercise, and they have access to a broader choice of food sources.
Thanks for posting, Tanya! I find this kind of thing so interesting.
I listened to an interview with the man who created the foundation herd of Kiko goats. He had a lot of criteria they had to fill, and if they didn't fit the criteria, they were culled from his breeding program. The result was a hardy, parasite resistant goat. Makes me wonder if we aren't doing our own herds a disservice in the long run by coddling them. But of course, I expect different things from my goats than a wild goat would be able to do. Keeping up a high level of lactation for 10 months out of the year? I feel that they deserve some special treatment.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top