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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I’m not too worried just yet as it just started yesterday, but I decided to make a post about it anyways just in case.

My one year old ND doe has been squatting every 10-15 mins to pee, but nothing comes out. That, or just a dribble. Any ideas on what it could be? Shes acting normal, eating, drinking, etc.
 

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Here On Oaks-n-Goats Farm We Are Raising Pets, And Mini/Full Sized Backyard Milkers.
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Is she pregnant? My doe did that before kidding as if a kid was laying on her bladder, but sounds like she's 1 in heat, 2 has a infection
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Is she pregnant? My doe did that before kidding as if a kid was laying on her bladder, but sounds like she's 1 in heat, 2 has a infection
She kidded about a month ago, so definitely not pregnant. I’m thinking of calling the vet tomorrow if it continues.
 

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Is her back end swollen? Does she act like she's in pain when she trys to pee? You could check her temp.
 

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The Monkhood
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She kidded about a month ago, so definitely not pregnant. I’m thinking of calling the vet tomorrow if it continues.
Please get temperature readings for her, and keep a close eye out for low grade fever. A urine sample would help, collect it in a clean container to take to the vet. If it is a bladder infection, the infection will travel to her kidneys and left untreated there is possibility of damage to the kidneys. Once the kidneys become infected, you run the risk of her becoming very ill.

Since goats are prey animals, they tend to hide obvious signs of being unwell. Sometimes, an illness goes undetected or thought of as mild and that they will get over it. Because they are eating, drinking, walking around, etc. Until the goat goes down. Once that happens, the battle to help them regain their health is much more difficult.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Please get temperature readings for her, and keep a close eye out for low grade fever. A urine sample would help, collect it in a clean container to take to the vet. If it is a bladder infection, the infection will travel to her kidneys and left untreated there is possibility of damage to the kidneys. Once the kidneys become infected, you run the risk of her becoming very ill.

Since goats are prey animals, they tend to hide obvious signs of being unwell. Sometimes, an illness goes undetected or thought of as mild and that they will get over it. Because they are eating, drinking, walking around, etc. Until the goat goes down. Once that happens, the battle to help them regain their health is much more difficult.
I’ll be calling the vet tomorrow and will get a urine sample ASAP. I don’t yet have a thermometer specifically for the goats so I’ll pick that up as well. Thank you all so much for the advice, I’ll be sure to update this thread once the vet gets back to me or something else happens.
 

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Thanks. When/if you get the urine sample, pay attention to the color, whether there are signs of blood, if it is cloudy or clear, and if there are any strong smells in the urine. The vet will require either a freshly gathered sample or collect one for their use. Getting a urine sample today, for the vet, without knowing how long of a wait for an appointment, could make the sample too old to test.

Also, try to keep up with how much her kid weighs to make sure it is still gaining. You can weigh yourself, hold the kid and subtract the difference if all you have is a bathroom scale. Sometimes, when a doe is under the weather, the milk production will slack off and she may not have enough to adequately feed the little one.
 
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