Doeling not feeling well

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by mistyblue, May 19, 2010.

  1. mistyblue

    mistyblue Senior Member

    815
    Nov 13, 2008
    Angleton, Texas
    I have a 3 month old doe that is not feeling well. She is keeping her tail down, did not want to eat this moring and has cow pattie type diarrhea. I am not sure what her temp. is, as I have not taken it.

    I don't think she weights 15lbs, so I dosed her with not quite 1 ml of Baycox.

    I am not sure I did the right thing and if I did, did I give enough Baycox and how often should I give it? Do you think this sounds like cocci?
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    well I would have given her a whole 1ml because the dosage starts at one ml for up to 15lbs and then 1ml after that for every 15lbs

    If she stops eating I would also give her some warm electrolyte water - they seem to really enjoy it warm.
     

  3. mistyblue

    mistyblue Senior Member

    815
    Nov 13, 2008
    Angleton, Texas
    Stacey, do I need to give her anymore Baycox. I cannot remember if it is a one time only or if you give it more than once.

    I am at work for the next 10hrs with no one at home, I can leave if I need to. Should I run home around noon and check on her? And if she is still feeling bad what would you do.
     
  4. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    I wouldnt give her anymore -- Baycox is a one dose treatment. It may take up to 3 days for the diarrhea to stop depending on how severe her case is.

    if she was mine I would give her 'bounce back' electrolytes mixed in warm water. I would drench her with some if she didnt want to drink it on her own or if she will take it from a bottle I would bottle feed it to her.

    Check her temp - if its elevated I would give 1.5 UNITS of banamine. If you dont have banamine I would give one adult aspirin.
     
  5. mistyblue

    mistyblue Senior Member

    815
    Nov 13, 2008
    Angleton, Texas
    Thanks Stacey! I will give her some electrolytes w/warm water and will check her temp., I do have banamine.

    Her diarrhea was not to bad it was the firm cow patty consistancy. So no runs yet and she was not sick last night. I think I got it early.
     
  6. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    How is your baby this morning Misty?
     
  7. mistyblue

    mistyblue Senior Member

    815
    Nov 13, 2008
    Angleton, Texas
    She is doing so good, when I got home and feed them last night she was eating her grain and nibbling on hay.

    She still was holding her tail down this morning but her stool was pretty much back to normal, so I am hoping that she was still feeling just a little ucky. (is that a word - ucky)

    I am going to go ahead and worm her today with some Cydectin, and keep a eye on her for a few days. I wonder if I should go ahead and give her some Probias at the same time.
     
  8. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Have you done a fecal float on her at all? Are you sure she needs all that dewormer?
     
  9. mistyblue

    mistyblue Senior Member

    815
    Nov 13, 2008
    Angleton, Texas
    No fecal done, I was going by the vet as he advised that it should not hurt her to go ahead and worm with the Cydectin. Hmmmm so maybe I should hold off.
     
  10. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    I just personally do not believe in medicating them unless they really need it. We as a society have way over medicated out goats, and that is why so many of the dewormers do not work anymore, the worms have become resistant to it.
    So many dewormers the goats after they kid because the stress of kidding "could" cause the worms to become active. I have been kidding for 9 years and I have never dewormed after they kid.

    In the 9 years I have been doing this, I have deowrmed three times, and that was the first two years when I started because that was what my 4H leader said to do and then I started to research and decided I was not going to do it anymore unless they needed it, then the other time was last year, I say enough in the 5 fecal floats I did so they all got it.

    Now that all said, this is MY PERSONAL opinion, and this is what works for me, and I do believe it has a LOT to do with where you live and wht the weather is like there.
     
  11. DPW

    DPW New Member

    92
    Mar 13, 2010
    Crow, Oregon.
    Mistyblue, Sweetgoats is correct. You should not worm your goats just because your vet said it "should not hurt her......"
    Sorry but your vet is wrong. Sure, giving her Cydectin won't hurt her now but could hurt your entire herd over time.
    Internal parasites are a bigger problem than many goat owners understand. In many places throughout the world internal parasites are becoming resistant to all anthelmintics. And because of the cost of R&D of bringing a new medicine to market there are no new worm meds on the horizon.
    There are places in the southwest of this country where the raising of sheep or goats is not viable any more.
    In the grand scheme of things FEC's (fecal egg counts) are reasonably unexpensive. And fairly easy to perform yourself with a minimum investment.
    This I copied and pasted from the Langston University goat research web site. A VERY small portion of the information found there.

    "Parasitism, and gastrointestinal nematode parasitism in particular, is arguably the most serious constraint affecting small ruminant production world-wide. Economic losses are caused by decreased production, cost of prevention, cost of treatment, and the death of infected animals. It is difficult by any form of major survey or other estimation to establish precise figures on losses incurred in production from infection and disease. Even minimal accuracy of loss estimates is difficult because production diseases or disorders may result from interaction with nutritional and environmental stresses, management methods, concurrent diseases, genetic predispositions, or other factors. Periodic reports on such losses from governmental agencies and others, always range into millions of dollars per year and include all phases of production.

    Problems with nematode parasitism are often classified as production disease (i.e. chronic subclinical condition affecting productivity such as weight loss, reduced weight gain, reproductive inefficiency, etc.). A summary of diagnostic laboratory necropsies in Kentucky showed that worms accounted for 90% of the deaths in 428 goats submitted. Since goats and sheep share the same parasites, a recent publication of the USDA-APHIS-VS provided some data on the magnitude of the problem. Sixty-two percent of 5,174 sheep producers surveyed in the United States identified stomach/intestinal nematodes as a major concern. These losses were compounded in the southeastern region (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia) of the U.S. because climatic conditions are generally more conducive to the growth and establishment of large nematode parasite populations. Seventy-five percent of 467 sheep producers surveyed in this region identified stomach/intestinal nematodes as a major concern."


    In my opinion all of us goat breeders need to educate ourselves about this problem before we reach the point of no return. And don't kid yourself. This could happen.
    Another good spot for info on internal parasites.

    http://www.scsrpc.org/