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arnold_acres
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 6 month old doeling who has a 106.1 temp. I am currently out of meds (I know, bad) and all I have id CD/T. She is acting a little off but mostly normal. She isn't too interested in grain and her poop is clumping together but not runny. Her rumen is active and she ate her hay this morning. There is some snow here but they haven't been cold. They have heat lamps and lots of straw. Please help!!!!!!
 

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Ok, a little more info.

What is the temp there? Has this one been drinking? I would get an electrolytes in her. Does she have a runny nose? Nasty eyes? How is her breathing? Any rattle sounds?
 

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Are you sure the Therm is right? What made you take her temp? Just wondering.
 

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A fever that high is a sign of some kind of infection. I had a similar experience with one of my doelings recently (her temp was 106.5, clumpy/mucousy poop, no interest in grain but still eating hay.) My goat did have a cough and some not-so-good breath sounds. She recovered well after a course of Albon and Nuflor. For a temp that high I would want to give antibiotics if it didn't seem to be going down on its own pretty fast. I would also be giving probiotics and drenching electrolyte solution (like Pedialyte) if the goat wasn't drinking much water and was getting dehydrated.
 

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I agree, try another thermometer to be sure.

If it is that high, I highly suggest starting antibiotics ASAP, I would get some right away, don't wait.
If she has pneumonia, it won't take long to overcome her, without treatment. Even with infections and high fever, is bad without starting them on antibiotics.


Question, was she running from you prior to catching her? If so, that can give false reading. Always let them calm/cool down before getting a temp.
 

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Goat Girl
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If where you are is like where I am it went from about 60 degrees one day for the high to snow and 20 degrees the next day for the high. That is a lot of stress on the goats, even when they have a nice warm barn. With stress often comes pneumonia so I would definitely be treating her for pneumonia ASAP. Do you have a good vet that will give you meds without you having to haul her in? If you do, ask for a shot of Draxxin (it is dosed at 1 cc per 100 lbs) and a dose of Banamine for the fever and inflammation in her lungs. Draxxin is wonderful and will have her feeling way better in about 24 hrs if an infection is the problem. The banamine will also help her feel better. If you can't get anything from your vet then get some penicillin from your feed store (like tractor supply) and start her on that until you can get something better.
 

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we had a similar problem with a doe this fall nothing worked to get that fever down, the vet said he was sure it was pnuemonia so gave her draxin, but still high fever, finally tried children;s ibuprophen and within an hour her temp was normal. had to do it again the next day.
 

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They have heat lamps and lots of straw.
I would strongly suggest getting rid of the heat lamps. Heat lamps can easily cause pneumonia because of the wide fluctuations in temperatures. Another word of warning - putting a heat lamp on an animal that already has pneumonia has been known to kill them in a lot of cases.
 

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www.wildheartsranch.org
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Drat, lost my post.

If your thermometer is indeed correct that temperature is approaching the point where it could become dangerous and you NEED to get it down now. Ice bath works the fastest. Fevers can be caused by either bacterial or viral infection, but that high makes me think viral in which cause antibiotics won't help and might hurt by compromising her system. Once the temp is down you can get your vet's opinion on whether to treat with penicillin or not. If you and the vet do suspect a virus all you can do is support therapy until it runs its course - vitamins, electrolytes, and probiotics. Offer food and water - if she stops drinking you'll have to drench, but don't worry if she doesn't want to eat.
 

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I would strongly suggest getting rid of the heat lamps. Heat lamps can easily cause pneumonia because of the wide fluctuations in temperatures. Another word of warning - putting a heat lamp on an animal that already has pneumonia has been known to kill them in a lot of cases.
I had sick goats in the past, used the heat lamp, even with adults, that were really sick. It didn't make things worse, it helps so they do not have to fight to keep warm and fight the virus too. This is just until they start eating good and appear to feel better.
If a goat doesn't have appetite, doesn't eat enough, very thin and doesn't have a heat source to go too, that is a disaster in itself, when very ill.
I will use the heat lamp with goats as sick as the one we are trying to help here. JMO :(

Have you retook her temp?
 

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How is your doe doing?

I only use a heat lamp if they are new born like a day or two old and ONLY if they are weak.

Heat lamp in fine for a sick goat but not all the time at all.
 

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arnold_acres
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you everyone!!! My vet was in the hospital herself so she couldn't come out but luckily I'm doing an internship at a livestock vet for school (I'm 15). I just went with my gut feeling and decided no antibiotice just baby aspirin and electrolytes. I don't feel comfortable pulling the lamps because it has been getting -10 here (Lake Tahoe, CA) at night. She is doing better. Just one degree high but the vet should be coming tomorrow morning. Once again, thanks g
 
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