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Hi All!
I have a 5month old fainting doe. We have had her almost 2 months. From day 1 she has been a sweet girl that loves to cuddle, but not very active. Her brother is a wild man, running, climbing, ya know normal goat stuff. She on the other hand does none of that. She eats & drinks normal, no fever, no diarrhea. At first I though she was just shy & needed to get comfortable, but after 2 months still nothing. About 2 weeks ago she started what I can only describe as seizing. Literally just all of a sudden goes completely rigid falls over & then screams. She will even do this while laying down, just suddenly roll over, go ridgid & scream.

I took her to the only vet within 100 miles of us that will see goats 7ndays ago, he said she had a mild case of pneumonia. But he couldn't explain the seizing, she did it 3 times in front of him. He just kind of blew it off.
Other than no longer having a labored breathing pattern, nothing else has improved since the vet visit. I am terrified she isn't going to come back from one of these episodes. This is happening 9-12 times a day. Any ideas on what it could be?
 

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Since I will have nothing to do with myotonics, I might be completely off base here... But... something has gone wrong with the contractions that myotonics are bred for????
 

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No, it isn't the total body contraction paralysis/freezing known as "fainting" if it is a seizure. But it could be related, if something has gone wrong neurologically.
 

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No, it isn't the total body contraction paralysis/freezing known as "fainting" if it is a seizure. But it could be related, if something has gone wrong neurologically.
I can't really tell from the description. It sounds like neurological but her being a myotonic confuses me.
 

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Being Myotonic is neurological. Genetically affecting the neurons. But the normal "faint" you are asking if is was is not a seizure. It is a complete and total freeze of the body. All the muscles are contracting at the same time while the goat remains completely conscious and helpless.
That isn't what the OP is describing, so it isn't a normal myotonic "faint"
But as I've said, it could be connected, if something has gone wrong.
 
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Sometimes people, and I would assume animals can develop deficiencies after or with an illness.

I'm wondering if thiamine has been used or might be a treatment option? It might at least give us an idea if this is neurological if it's at least manageable or not...

Are the seizures the same as before treating pneumonia, more often, less often?

Also, and I'm asking more for others. What was the specific treatment for the pneumonia? And when was she last tested or treated for worms?
 

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Sometimes people, and I would assume animals can develop deficiencies after or with an illness.

I'm wondering if thiamine has been used or might be a treatment option? It might at least give us an idea if this is neurological if it's at least manageable or not...

Are the seizures the same as before treating pneumonia, more often, less often?

Also, and I'm asking more for others. What was the specific treatment for the pneumonia? And when was she last tested or treated for worms?
I think if this was a thiamine issues she'd be dead by now...
 

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Could you get a video of her seizing? What treatment did the vet do. It really upsets me when vets brush things off. This is serious. He should have ran test, offered some kind of treatment to help her. ANY WAY, off my soap box!
Her not being playful from day one is a concern. Heart murmur is what comes to mind or other heart defects. Hows her breathing? any weezing or ?? If she running fever? ( 101.5-103.5 is normal range) What family history do you have on her if any?
 

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I had an Oberhasli kid that did the exact same thing. Fall over and scream. She also played very little and when she tried she would hurt herself.
The thing that brought her out of it was twice daily doses of vitamin B complex mixed with pepto just to cut the taste. She grew up a strong healthy milker.
I don't know, I was trying everything. Later research says it may, not for sure, been a B6 deficiency.
 

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Screaming is scary. B vitamins are so important for goats so I would definitely start adding them. Since she is a fainter I have to wonder if this is something connected/gone off the rails/neurologically related . I'm assuming parasites are no issue? Where did you acquire her from and can the former owner shed any light on it? Young goats should not be acting subdued. Wish I could help!
 

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Hi Amy...
I have no experience with Fainting Goats or seizures but, feel your concern. I hope you find the answers you need.

I believe you came to the right place to voice your concern. The combined knowledge of the people on this site and their willingness to share it with us is impressive!

Best of Luck!!

~ Hope ~
 

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It sounds reasonable that a goat is as likely to have a seizure disorder as any other species. A significant vitamin B deficiency can cause neurological disorders in human beings so, why not goats. I once bought a beautiful Cocker Spaniel with grand champions in his pedigree and he started having seizures at 6 months old. The vet said he had been “over bred” for desirable characteristics. On that note, your goat may not be inbred but closely bred to other fainting goats for the characteristic. Not all seizures are the grand mal type. Petite mal seizures can be mild and hardly noticeable or misdiagnosed. Blood tests wouldn’t diagnose a seizure disorder and I’m reasonably sure a goat wouldn’t cooperate with an EEG. If you give vitamin B and there’s no change, I would ask the vet that witnessed the behavior about an anticonvulsant.
 

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Maybe take her to another vet, get a second opinion. Unfortunately my first vet thought of goats as disposable livestock. Reluctant to help, make suggestions, etc. My second vet so totally different. Offering suggestions, asking history, offering diff treatments. Inquiring about this and that. And when she had the dig. She was able to give advice, and treatment. Didn't save my Oreo, but at least I was doing all I could.:run::run:
 
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