The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, new to the goat world! We are currently looking at bringing home pygmy or dwarf goats and are only open to wethers or does...BUT an opportunity has come up of 2 nigerian dwarf bucks who are 2 years old. Question: if we castrate them now at 2 years old, would: 1) there be any disadvantages or health problems 2) would any typical buck behaviors (e.g., potential aggression, smell, anything else you might think of!) miraculously decrease soon after castration or because they are already a few years old (versus castrating them at 3-6 months) do they persist? As beginners, we want to make sure we know what to expect to make it a good fit for all. Definitely not comfortable with bucks. Thanks for any/all input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,654 Posts
If they're nice (as in sweet, gentle, curious) bucks, they'll be even nicer wethers. The smell will disappear, as will most of their long hair. Because they are mature, they will probably retain more of their buckish behavior than males castrated early, but if you aren't planning to keep any females then you may not see this behavior at all by next season. You'll just need to make sure that you don't accidentally train buckish behaviors into place. If a goat acts too "happy" to see you (blubbering, tongue out, spraying, swatting), walk away and interact later after he calms down and stops treating you like a doe in heat. Feeding treats or petting to distract him will train him to continue acting like a buck because he thinks he'll be rewarded. Ignore his overtures and the behavior should fade pretty quickly.

On the other hand, if the goats are fearful or aggressive toward people then I'd pass. Castration can sometimes mellow a bad attitude, but it's often not enough. Castration usually makes the aggression less persistent, less violent, and less dangerous, but a goat that doesn't like people isn't magically going to become friendly because he's neutered. But if they're sweet little stinkies who don't understand why you won't throw your arms around them and give them a big, sloppy kiss on the face, then wethering will probably be the best thing you ever do for them. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you so much for this thoughtful and comprehensive reply! Definitely a lot of helpful information and considerations. Much gratitude. Think we will try to stick to wethers from the beginning.
:)

If they're nice (as in sweet, gentle, curious) bucks, they'll be even nicer wethers. The smell will disappear, as will most of their long hair. Because they are mature, they will probably retain more of their buckish behavior than males castrated early, but if you aren't planning to keep any females then you may not see this behavior at all by next season. You'll just need to make sure that you don't accidentally train buckish behaviors into place. If a goat acts too "happy" to see you (blubbering, tongue out, spraying, swatting), walk away and interact later after he calms down and stops treating you like a doe in heat. Feeding treats or petting to distract him will train him to continue acting like a buck because he thinks he'll be rewarded. Ignore his overtures and the behavior should fade pretty quickly.

On the other hand, if the goats are fearful or aggressive toward people then I'd pass. Castration can sometimes mellow a bad attitude, but it's often not enough. Castration usually makes the aggression less persistent, less violent, and less dangerous, but a goat that doesn't like people isn't magically going to become friendly because he's neutered. But if they're sweet little stinkies who don't understand why you won't throw your arms around them and give them a big, sloppy kiss on the face, then wethering will probably be the best thing you ever do for them. Good luck!
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top