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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all!

I take care of 3 adult goats and 4 kids on a farm in Hawaii. This evening our female Alpine was a attacked by the owners dog. She is our biggest goat, heard leader, has horns and 2 kids that are about 10 weeks. I think she was trying to protect her babies.

The dog mainly attacked under her ear. It's about 3 in long and maybe half an in deep. It happens right before sundown so I couldn't get a pic, but I will post one as soon as I can. I cleaned the wound with water and iodine. How would you care for the wound? Should we put her down? The owner thinks it will be too hard and expensive to heal. I was thinking of using a skin staple and get some penicillin.

The bleeding wasn't too bad. She seemed very stunned afterwards, but still came to me when I called her and has been eating.
 

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Is the doe's tetanus shots up to date? Keep the wound clean and watch for swelling. Do you have any Banamine? That will help with pain and swelling.
Has the dog been neutralized? Chances are it may try and go after the goats again, especially the kids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's the owners dog. He has attacked the goats plenty in the past, but they have no first aid kit for them. It's ridiculous. I am going to push for her to get rid of them.

Anywho, we don't have Banamine, but I will call the feed stores first thing in the morning. I don't know if she's up to date on tetanus, but the dog is. They just had their yearly vet check up last month, so I'll ask.

Should I try to close the wound? Any other antibiotics I should try to find?
 

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Tetanus isn't like rabies. It does not really matter if the dogs don't have tetanus, because it is in the environs and can get into any wound. Here on the mainland most feed store carry the tetanus toxoid. However, that is not what you want. You want the tetanus anti-toxin. I order that from online, or get it from a vet. Banamine I have to get from a vet.

I'm startled the owners think it is better to lose a good productive doe than to assist her healing. Yeah, the ear may never look right again, but this should not be a death sentence if she's supported.

When my dogs attack, they get put down. Full stop. If they'll do it to my animals, they'll do it to the neighbors'.
 

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Don’t close the wound up. From what I gather with dog bites is since they are dirty if you close it you are trapping a lot of bacteria in there and will have issues on my hands. So far every person I know that took a animal in over a dog bite the vet leaves it open. Flush it with iodine 2X a day and put some kind of antibiotic on it. A good shot of penicillin won’t hurt either just make sure you give it for 5 days.
I know you are in a hard spot if these are not your animals but if the owner won’t get rid of the dog something needs to be done to try and keep it away from the Goats. A few suggestions would be of course to put the dog in a cage, but if it can get in so can others. Hot fence along the Goats pen might help too. I would get the hottest one you could find!
 

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@Dayna

Can you weigh in on this? You might have knowledge of laws and resources we don't?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, the dog thing is a problem. If they would at least fix the fence then he would never be able to get in. He's gotten in 5 times in the 7 months I've been here and attacked 3 of those times. This is the worst attack. She should at the very least be equipped to care for them since she's putting them in danger. I love them, but I'm going to push for her to rehome them.

There is a small chicken pasture I put the goats in for now. The dog has never been able to get in because the pasture has a good fence.

The only goat vet comes to our town once a month, so seeing a vet it out. Ordering anything online takes about a week to get here. I'm going to clean it twice a day, put some triple antibiotic ointment on it and search for a b complex shot and some penicillin. If I can't find a b complex shot will b complex capsules from the drug store work? I'd love some banamine but it might be too expensive. Any other suggestions for care?
 

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You say you take care of the goats on this farm, but I don't know any of the living arrangements in place here.

Do the owners live on site? Do you live on site? Do the dogs live on site?

Who actually is where? I'm not just being curious. I only want to grasp the terrain before I suggest further.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Alright guys, you have been so helpful so far!

The owner said she's up to date on tetanus. And that I can heal her wound if I can do it for $100. Penicillin is $20 at the feed store. No one has b-complex. Should I try to buy anything online. It might not get here until next week. Would it still be helpful?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Me and my husband live on a coffee farm in exchange for work. I mainly do the animals and he does labor for the coffee. The owners live in a larger house the on property with their two dogs. The German Sheppard is the problem. The property is fenced into 4 areas- living, goats, chickens, and the coffee. The problem is that the dogs can escape through the main gate if no one is watching. They some how (still haven't figured it out) get into the coffee field then get to the goat pasture from there. The fence between the goat and coffee is falling apart. I truly think if they got that fence fixed it would no longer be an issue. The German Sheppard can't jump because of a bad hip so he only goes under.

Weeds grow like crazy here. A hot fence might not work because of the tall grasses? Also there's lava rock everywhere. The owner seems to think a hot fence is to difficult, but I still need to look into it.

Their money maker is coffee. Not the goats or chickens. Now they are kinda like pets and people can feed them when they come for tours. They spent a lot for a good fence along the perimeter of the property to keep out pigs, but don't want to spend the money on a fence between the goat and the coffee. It would be a good investment since she would spend less on medical bills.

You say you take care of the goats on this farm, but I don't know any of the living arrangements in place here.

Do the owners live on site? Do you live on site? Do the dogs live on site?

Who actually is where? I'm not just being curious. I only want to grasp the terrain before I suggest further.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Good news! I drove an hr to the vet and got benemine, penicillin, silver cream/advantage, betadine, and lots of syringes. The owner said the vet comes to town next week and she'll pay for the visit if she looks like she'll make it.

The owner is looking into an electric fence. Any other ideas? After the goat is healed or gone I think I'm just going to push for her to rehome them. It's a shame because it would be an oasis for goats. They have like 6-8 acres to themselves, weeds grow like crazy here and no other predators like coyotes or neighbor dogs.
 

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Here's an idea, just throwing it out there. Ask the owners to envisage the reactions of the customers feeding the cute goats and having a German Shepherd get in and savage a goat right in front of them....Perhaps the very goat their beloved toddler had just then been petting...
 
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Or worse, in the melee, said toddler gets run over or bitten. I saw a little girl bitten in the thigh by a German Sheppard once because she was between him and the object of his attack. He just grabbed her and literally threw her out of the way, but she still ended up bitten.
 

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Yes, I was hoping the owners would reach that obvious possibility without us. No guarantees though...
 

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Da Goat Nanny- so heartwarming to hear how compassionate and caring you are in a very difficult work environment- ive been in same type of predicaments, so well done, and much respect for not turning your back on it all! I had a goat bitten by a dog once- not as badly as yours, shock was the immediate problem. Vet stapled the small wounds and then antibiotic, pain relief. I can not get banamine from my vets in UK. I have used metacam injections (or oral- but can cause stomach ulcers) for dogs or horses (most drugs are not licenced for goats anyways). As a last resort soluble aspirin is well taken by goats (and toxic to dogs so beware where you store them)- a very high dose of baby aspirin (8 tablets at a time) 2 x a day is useful in the most pain situations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Unfortunately something bad would have to happen forcing them to get rid of the dog. He's like their kid.

So far the doe's doing okay. The vet will be here Tuesday to further assess. She has an appetite and is drinking. She'll eat whatever I bring her, but won't leave her shelter. Today the wound looks more swollen, but no flys/bugs are around it. I'm not sure if the swelling is a normal reaction or not. We had a chicken with a swollen eye that looked super bad (couldn't open her eye, puss) until it got better.
 
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