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I have 3-4yr old welsh(supposed) mare. She might be bred. She doesn't let use pet her, she is worrisome to be around because she might bite or something. What should I do?
 

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Is she something your attached to? If so get some one experienced to do some handling with her, if not, get rid of her.
 

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I don't mean this in an offensive way at all but, I would hope she is not bred because I think 3 or 4 is mighty young to breed a horse.. I'm not trying to be rude, that just my 2 cents from what I've heard from all my breeder friends. ;)

Anyway though, at that young of an age if the mare is like that I think that if you feel worried around her you should maybe have someone else with experience in horses do ground work with her or consider re homing her and finding an easier to manage horse. Some mares can be hard to deal with on their own, but when you add that the mare is very young and pregnant you may have even more trouble.
 

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Does she try and bite all the time or maybe once in awhile??? If it seems like once a month then she is in heat so no prego.
It sounds like you just want a colt out of her maybe???? If so I would talk with a large vet explaine she is not nice and if he can do a ultrasound......find out if she's bred if not send her to the glue factory.
If you want to keep her for some reason I would think twice. There is many good horses out there.
 

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Food is a good way to win a horse over. If you just stay and keep her company during your free time she may warm up to you. And ground work is a good way to get to know your horse. And mares tend to be a bit more moody I've heard. It's a girl thing. (I've only worked with geldings maybe a person that knows more than I will chime in)
 

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Mares are more moody for sure. You are right about the food but she is not a nice horse and especially with so many horses that needs to be saved now a day I hear about so many people ending up getting hurt. One kick to the head and your dead.
I did win my made over she was abused and the first time we met she tried to bite me. I would pet her and ever time she tried to bite me she got smacked. But I have also been around horses my whole life and till I started having kids was the one who worked with all our foals.
 

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I agree with Jessica84. Mares tend to be more moody, which in turn can make them a little harder to handle and form a relationship with. I won my difficult mare over, but it took a lot of time and energy and I have been around horses for almost my whole life. If this mare is that difficult I wouldn't take the chance. Horses are dangerous when they want to be and sometimes even when they don't mean to be. Get a horse that you can appreciate and love, not a threat. ;)
 

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I have 3-4yr old welsh(supposed) mare. She might be bred. She doesn't let use pet her, she is worrisome to be around because she might bite or something. What should I do?
How long have you had her? How much experience do you have with horses, and do they make you nervous? Has she ever tried to bite, pinned her ears at you, or actually bit?
 

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I've never had that much trouble with mares. I like them better actually they have a vive on the trail I like. Why are you afraid of her? Horses feel your energy very plainly. Fear from you makes her fearful...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
She's been abused, by her first owner. The guy I got her from 'saved' her from the glue factory; he's done some lead training with her and he's been on her back(and she didn't buck and kick at that) He said she's always been run with studs.
I've had her for about a month.
My experience with horses is we used to go riding about once every 2months. But lately we haven't gone at all.(A time thing) Really big horses make me a little nervous, but mostly I'm fine with them.
I'm not really attached to her, but when we first got her she was real nice, so I think it might be something I did. (Also I traded 3 bucklings for her, you can't get to many horses at that price!)
She has bitten my sister and she pins her ears at us too. She does try to bit. A lot of the time her ears are 1/2 pinned and her eyes say 'move, or I'll do something'. Them I move a bit and push her head away.
She was a bit worse then she is now, so she is improving a bit. She's also smart and learns quickly.

I'm afraid she's going to just turn on me, or hurt someone bad. She's kicked at me, as well. But only once. I try not to be afraid when I'm by her, but try to have a confident posture Etc.

What type of ground work should I be doing? I'm don't really want to give up yet. She follows us around in her pen. And yesterday she spooked and got out, but catching her wasn't too hard-She came to a shaking grain pail.
Oh, she looks like a mini quarter horse:)
 

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She might come around. It sounds like she is improving. I'm pretty much just repeating what was said, a bite can be dangerous,( my horse was playing and took a chunk out of my shoulder) a kick is even more so. She does know your fear and will be afraid to. Just talk calm and quite and don't let her get away with threatening you. She might come around and again she might not. Make good memories instead if bad ones and she will remember them.
 

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Its hard to really give advise because she was a abused horse. I think I would just have a kind hand but when she does act aggressive have a very firm hand. I bet anything that the abuse stopped when is did act aggressive so now she has learned that when she is she is left alone. Its gonna be a challenge but you need to show her your her friend but also your not going to put up with it.
 

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3 to 4 years really isn't too young to breed. Would have been nice if she wasn't, but that's the way it is. You are going to have to get on top of this behaviour quickly because it can become worse. Be very, very firm about the bad behaviour. Do NOT ever let her turn her butt to you....make it very uncomfortable for her to do so. My "trainer" always says you have 5 seconds to "kill" them when they kick or bite LOL You really can't hurt them in that amount of time and after 5 seconds, they have no clue what they are being punished for. NEVER hand feed this horse....always put her feed in a bucket, treats too. You say she's been abused, but do you know this for certain or is just an assumption since she was "saved" from a sale? Sounds like a very spoiled animal that has gotten away with this behaviour. I dealt with this from a welsh/QH mix I owned. We raised her from a baby and spoiled her rotten. She was HORRIBLE! Bite, kick, buck...I loved her to death tho. The best advice is to be hyper-aware when you are around her and don't let yourself get in a position where she can hurt you. Always try to block behaviour....if you see her getting ready to bite you, get your elbow up so she smacks her head on it instead of getting you in her teeth (if you block with your elbow, SHE is hitting it, not you hitting her....). If she's trying to swing her butt to kick...make her turn back around (you might have to carry a rope and just smack her on the butt whenever she turns it to you). Good luck and be careful
 

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(A time thing) Really big horses make me a little nervous, but mostly I'm fine with them.
I'm not really attached to her, but when we first got her she was real nice, so I think it might be something I did.
She has bitten my sister and she pins her ears at us too. She does try to bit. A lot of the time her ears are 1/2 pinned and her eyes say 'move, or I'll do something'. Them I move a bit and push her head away.
She was a bit worse then she is now, so she is improving a bit. She's also smart and learns quickly.

I'm afraid she's going to just turn on me, or hurt someone bad. She's kicked at me, as well. But only once. I try not to be afraid when I'm by her, but try to have a confident posture Etc.

What type of ground work should I be doing? I'm don't really want to give up yet. She follows us around in her pen. And yesterday she spooked and got out, but catching her wasn't too hard-She came to a shaking grain pail.
Oh, she looks like a mini quarter horse:)
I doubt it's anything you have 'done'. I would be more inclined to think she is picking up on your lack of confidence, nervousness and lack of experience and testing her boundaries. The fact that she is smart and learns quickly gives her the advantage right now. You need to learn to use that to your advantage. I also doubt that she will turn on you or anyone else. From what you've said, she does not sound mean. Renegade horses do not follow people around in their pens - they meet you at the gate with ears pinned and teeth bared. It sounds more like she has been trained incorrectly (excessive force), allowed to get away with unacceptable behaviour, or a combination of both.

The first step to training/working with a horse is to learn to read them and understand their psychology. Horses are prey animals - that drives a lot of their behaviour. Do you have a round pen? Here is a link to a video made by John Lyons - he is pretty good - showing basic ground work. That is where you need to start, because that is what is going to establish a relationship and trust.


Buck Braneman is another good trainer. If you have the opportunity, I suggest you rent the movie "Buck". I personally do not like Parelli. Clinton Anderson is also pretty good. For insight into her behaviour, www.Equisearch.com has a lot of articles written by some good people. You might want to look into that, as well.

As far as her biting goes - when she bites or tries to bite backhand her. Never, ever slap her! If you slap her a few times, she will become head shy and start ducking away from your hand because she won't know if she is going to be slapped or petted. Be advised that when you backhand her, she could very well come back and try to bite again - backhand her again harder.

A couple of things about horses that you can use in your favor as needed. The quickest way to stop unwanted behaviour is to make the horse work immediately following the behaviour. Two things horses really don't like to have to do is turn in small circles, and back up. The reason for that is because their size makes it hard work for them. Say you're leading her and she is getting in your space and crowding you. You never want her in your space or crowding you because that makes it easier for her to hurt you - even accidentally - and/or bite. Immediately turn and make her back up. If she doesn't want to back up there is a pressure point on the point of her shoulder. Put your thumb on it and press. Back her up a few steps, release, and try again. If you're leading her and she tries to run past you, take her on around you in a circle. Twirl the end of the lead rope at her back end - you do not necessarily have to hit her - like you would while lunging her. Take her around a few times and try leading her again. Repeat as necessary.
While you are working with her always keep your movements calm and deliberate, and keep your emotions under control. Watch for her licking her lips because that means she is learning. Always end the session on a positive note.

Hopefully this helps, and provides you with a starting point. I apologize if any of it sounds patronizing, but I don't know how much you know and figured it would be good to mention. Good luck! :)
 

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For ground work ideas I would recommend picking up some books, videos, and looking up (i may have spelt the name wrong) Parrelli horsemanship and John lyons horsemanship. They have a lot of good instructions on training that help you form a relationship with the horse and work with them. I have friends who have had a lot of success using john's methods on crazy horses, and I would definitely recommend looking into it. :)
 

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I think it just takes time , especially when they have been abused. I have a miniature mare who has been abused and it has taken three years to get her to trust me. Yes, mares can be a little more challenging. Just give her time and patience , she will eventually settle down. Maybe you could start by doing a little bit of leading her around and walking her. I know this worked with my mare. Good luck and stay safe.:)
 

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To help prevent nipping and biting, don't hand feed her. If you give her treats, put it in her feed tub.

Make sure you always have an "out" when you are in an enclosed space with her (stall). Stay by her head,
keep your hand on her halter and don't give her an opportunity to bite or kick!

If you are truly fearful of her, it might be better to sell her and get an animal that you are comfortable
around. It's no fun to be afraid of an animal!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
She's getting better, not nipping at us, and she's not trying to get into our space so much. She has a lot of energy.
 
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