The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 3 year old nubian doe. I've been told that she really qualifies as a mini nubian. I use her in our traveling petting zoo and i puposefully did not want to breed her. People are funny in a petting zoo and look at "sexual" anatomy and make all kinds of comments. I knew she would have a huge udder and would get lots of comments about it. However, when she was turning 2, she developed a small udder and my friend that had milking goats, asked me if I was sure she wasn't bred - she wasn't. Now that she is three, this udder is getting bigger. I now have had people ask me if she needs milked? Her udder is not the size of a milking goat, and yet it is definitely a little full - I never tried milking it, as I know she would probably be a real nightmare to try and do that.
so my predicament is that if I do breed her (I only have a pygmy buck here), then for sure, she will have a huge udder and i won't be able to use her in the petting zoo, and I'm not interested in milking her. If I don't breed her, is this udder going to keep getting bigger each year? Is this a hormonal thing? Anyone ever have a doe develop an udder and not be bred?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
627 Posts
there is a lady i know that has a doe that is 5 years old
she has been milking this doe for the last 3 years
the doe has never been bred

doesn't happen very often but it happens

as far as what happens next
i don't know
betty milks her doe so it has gotten bigger but i dont know what will happen if you ignore it
and if you do breed her
you don't have to milk her
leave the babies on her and they will do all the milking
if you handle the babies ALOT they will be friendly even tho they are dam raised and you can use them for the petting zoo
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
29,236 Posts
if you milk her she will continue to produce milk.

People go to fairs all the time where there are goats with udders -- I wonder why they are so concerned about such things on petting zoo animals :scratch:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I probably get those kind of questions and "looks" because petting zoos get a different type of crowd. If you're going to a fair, it's usually someone who likes animals. At a petting zoo, it's usually a crowd that is just out for the community event for fun; or as today, we were at two nursery schools where the kids look at poop and look at the rear ends and teachers aren't much better.
Well, I guess I won't try to milk her - I don't have time anyway. I just didn't want to take a chance that the udder would get bigger after the babies would be weaned - oh, and I really have to bottlefeed the babies - there is just too much handling and petting for any animal to expect to tolerate unless they are bottleraised, and then some still have trouble. My one pygmy baby from this year, will still spook if someone runs close to her...
thanks for the input
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,784 Posts
We've had lots of dam-raised babies that are sooooo friendly, it depends on the amount of time you spend w/ them. I especially like to spend time w/ them when they are just tiny, tiny babies - after the momma has had some time to bond w/ them.
I have dam-raised kids that will be going to a petting zoo this month. One of them will literally climb in your lap like a dog and just rest there, she did it the other day to a total stranger who came to pick out a goat. It's very much possible to get "petting zoo" friendly goaties and still have them be dam-raised. You could also try supplementing w/ the bottle if you can get them to take it. . . . just my thoughts. :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,224 Posts
Your doe could have whats called a precocious udder...meaning that she's making milk without being bred. If you choose to breed her and don't want to milk her you don't need to, babies can take it all and the more time they are handled the better accustomed to touching they get. I have a dam raised pygmy kid that will be anyones buddy. And I understand the curiosity of children, the pointing and laughing because "it looks funny", education is the key, they will still point and giggle but they will definately know what teats are for should you choose to breed your doe, seeing babies nursing will be an educational type thing.....and those giggling teachers should know better! If you use your pygmy buck, you'll have kinder kids that could be sold as dairy, the breed is "multi purpose".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks - that was the information I was looking for - precocious udder. Did a google search and got differing opinions. At this point it seems that I will probably just let it be. It seems that if she is bred, her udder will probably never shrink back to "tiny" - right? I don't have time for milking; I don't have time to sit and play with babies to make them tame enough for their future jobs; I've tried taking pygmy mothers and their babies to a petting zoo - they did not stay tame enough for future jobs; I also usually tie out the goats at nursery schools - like a dog so the children can walk up to them or stay away if they're not brave enough - can't tie a mother and then have their babies running all over the place being chased by children.
I've been doing petting zoos for 17 years so I know what works and doesn't work for us - I just didn't want this udder on this doe get so large that I couldn't use her and don't like to breed unless there is a good reason to have more babies.
Thanks everyone
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top