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I live in a humid part of the country that is heavily infested with parasites including the dreaded barber's pole worm, and have successfully used herbal wormers for over 12 years, and when I say successfully I mean I have never needed to resort to conventional wormers, not even in emergencies. I once purchased a doe that was delivered to me with an overload of parasites. She had been tested by a vet to be free of disease but those tests are not for worm loads of course. Not something anyone would willingly want to deal with but when it's delivered to your doorstep prepaid it's yours and now you have to address that. The vet said it wasn't a recent problem and was certain it was long-term, and that it was so far gone that it might've already been too late to save her. More on that later. Many people say that herbal wormers will not work in acute situations but I have witnessed otherwise so I have to respectfully disagree. Certain brands and certain formulas are not as effective, and I'll be the first to admit that. Some say that you shouldn't use herbal wormers because they are 'ineffective' or 'you have to understand how they work first'. But you don't have to be well-educated in natural remedies to use them. Synthetic chemical wormers are used by people all the time who have little understanding as to how they work, their toxicity or even know about the existence of recommended milk/meat withdrawal times.

A local breeder and I participated in an experimental trial, she followed a conservative conventional worming schedule according to the updated recommendations and used a conventional wormer as and when needed according to her herd's fecal tests (she tested each goat individually). I had my herd tested individually as well and both of us were testing on weekly basis, but I used herbal wormers exclusively. I started off with one brand, then another, then followed a recipe for a homemade formula, then another, then a different brand again and so on, taking a long break in between each one. Anthelmintic (anti-parasitic or deworming) herbs are not cumulative, meaning they do not have residues that build up and do not remain in the body for long periods of time like synthetic chemicals can and often do. But I took that extra step of taking long breaks in between different herbal formulas for the sake of consistency and because the other participant in this trial was skeptical. I would rather not name the brands in a public forum because most had merit and most of them were effective, but to varying degrees. Both of our herds had some of the same bloodlines, and we even exchanged some -but not all- of our goats throughout the trial so we could be sure that parasite-resistant genetics were not an influential variable. We lived near each other and we had the same soil, virtually the same soil mineral content (we tested), same hay, exact same weather (rainfall, humidity, temperatures, etc.). (And remember we had a few goats that kept being exchanged during every phase of the trial, the others goats -which were the majority- remained permanently in their respective herds/properties.) The results? Those in my herd consistently had the lowest worm count, and there was a dramatic difference between the worm counts of our respective herds. My herd's counts went up during the long breaks in between different herbal wormers, but never to a concerning point. There was a gradual but significant drop in worm counts after I started using certain herbal wormers. That drop continued to lower than anyone had ever expected with DWorm A (by Fir Meadow), with some of my does going down to and remaining at virtually zero on fecal test results. During the wet and hot seasons the breeder on the conventional wormer part of the trial would have her fecal results soar back to the same level they were before within weeks of administering a drug.

In a nutshell herbal wormers work quite differently than their synthetic counterparts. They are broad spectrum and worms cannot develop resistance to them and they are usually given weekly (sprinkled on feed, added to water, drenched, placed in treats, etc.). Used properly there are no withdrawal periods and no liver damage to worry about. I keep extra DWorm A on hand for emergencies, but I haven't had any emergencies with my own goats in over 12 years. As for the doe I purchased that arrived with a huge worm load mentioned above? She is still alive and thriving and with beautiful fecal test results. In my experience DWorm A is the finest formulation on the market, especially if the problem has gone too far. You don't give a regular dose of herbal wormer for acute cases/emergencies, that can lead to disappointing results and is why some think they are ineffective. Ideally the worm load should not be allowed to climb that high, but sometimes, like in the case of my purchase, you need to know what to do if you have to deal with that situation. There are instructions on the DWorm A label for what to do in such cases, and we're talking about at least 1 tbsp. full every two hours. Please understand, I would never recommend overdosing a conventional drug as I understand all too well that would do far more harm than good. Never increase the dosage rate on a conventional medication without first consulting sound professional veterinarian guidance. This advice is intended for herbal dewormers only, and DWorm A in particular. Some herbal wormer formulations might contain certain ingredients that higher doses of might not be very desirable so that is something to take into consideration as well.
 

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I was skeptical when it came to herbal. I bought a bag of LOH herbs several years ago but never trusted it. It sat in my cabinet barely used. Then I had severe Barber Pole out break and nothing was working. Using the herbs and essential oils saved herd. Many say herbs are great for prevention but wont work under heavy loads...I can say that is not true. It worked for me. I continue to use Land of Havilah parasite formula with success. I added Essential oils and have never looked back.
 

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I live in a humid part of the country that is heavily infested with parasites including the dreaded barber's pole worm, and have successfully used herbal wormers for over 12 years, and when I say successfully I mean I have never needed to resort to conventional wormers, not even in emergencies. I once purchased a doe that was delivered to me with an overload of parasites. She had been tested by a vet to be free of disease but those tests are not for worm loads of course. Not something anyone would willingly want to deal with but when it's delivered to your doorstep prepaid it's yours and now you have to address that. The vet said it wasn't a recent problem and was certain it was long-term, and that it was so far gone that it might've already been too late to save her. More on that later. Many people say that herbal wormers will not work in acute situations but I have witnessed otherwise so I have to respectfully disagree. Certain brands and certain formulas are not as effective, and I'll be the first to admit that. Some say that you shouldn't use herbal wormers because they are 'ineffective' or 'you have to understand how they work first'. But you don't have to be well-educated in natural remedies to use them. Synthetic chemical wormers are used by people all the time who have little understanding as to how they work, their toxicity or even know about the existence of recommended milk/meat withdrawal times.

A local breeder and I participated in an experimental trial, she followed a conservative conventional worming schedule according to the updated recommendations and used a conventional wormer as and when needed according to her herd's fecal tests (she tested each goat individually). I had my herd tested individually as well and both of us were testing on weekly basis, but I used herbal wormers exclusively. I started off with one brand, then another, then followed a recipe for a homemade formula, then another, then a different brand again and so on, taking a long break in between each one. Anthelmintic (anti-parasitic or deworming) herbs are not cumulative, meaning they do not have residues that build up and do not remain in the body for long periods of time like synthetic chemicals can and often do. But I took that extra step of taking long breaks in between different herbal formulas for the sake of consistency and because the other participant in this trial was skeptical. I would rather not name the brands in a public forum because most had merit and most of them were effective, but to varying degrees. Both of our herds had some of the same bloodlines, and we even exchanged some -but not all- of our goats throughout the trial so we could be sure that parasite-resistant genetics were not an influential variable. We lived near each other and we had the same soil, virtually the same soil mineral content (we tested), same hay, exact same weather (rainfall, humidity, temperatures, etc.). (And remember we had a few goats that kept being exchanged during every phase of the trial, the others goats -which were the majority- remained permanently in their respective herds/properties.) The results? Those in my herd consistently had the lowest worm count, and there was a dramatic difference between the worm counts of our respective herds. My herd's counts went up during the long breaks in between different herbal wormers, but never to a concerning point. There was a gradual but significant drop in worm counts after I started using certain herbal wormers. That drop continued to lower than anyone had ever expected with DWorm A (by Fir Meadow), with some of my does going down to and remaining at virtually zero on fecal test results. During the wet and hot seasons the breeder on the conventional wormer part of the trial would have her fecal results soar back to the same level they were before within weeks of administering a drug.

In a nutshell herbal wormers work quite differently than their synthetic counterparts. They are broad spectrum and worms cannot develop resistance to them and they are usually given weekly (sprinkled on feed, added to water, drenched, placed in treats, etc.). Used properly there are no withdrawal periods and no liver damage to worry about. I keep extra DWorm A on hand for emergencies, but I haven't had any emergencies with my own goats in over 12 years. As for the doe I purchased that arrived with a huge worm load mentioned above? She is still alive and thriving and with beautiful fecal test results. In my experience DWorm A is the finest formulation on the market, especially if the problem has gone too far. You don't give a regular dose of herbal wormer for acute cases/emergencies, that can lead to disappointing results and is why some think they are ineffective. Ideally the worm load should not be allowed to climb that high, but sometimes, like in the case of my purchase, you need to know what to do if you have to deal with that situation. There are instructions on the DWorm A label for what to do in such cases, and we're talking about at least 1 tbsp. full every two hours. Please understand, I would never recommend overdosing a conventional drug as I understand all too well that would do far more harm than good. Never increase the dosage rate on a conventional medication without first consulting sound professional veterinarian guidance. This advice is intended for herbal dewormers only, and DWorm A in particular. Some herbal wormer formulations might contain certain ingredients that higher doses of might not be very desirable so that is something to take into consideration as well.
I got to that site but how much per say to you need to give to a 80 lb goat thanks
 

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On the website, there is a link "contact us", the company could answer all your questions concerning the dosages. The original thread was created May 20, 2018, and it's possible the original posting member may not see your question. Maybe this member could be of help to you also. @NigerianDwarfOwner707
 
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