The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,902 Posts
I believe @Moers kiko boars is pretty good with egg count numbers. Not sure on a chart though. It’d be awesome to have as a guideline but I can’t find one. I’d love one for a reference.

Though in my research about doing my own fecal egg counts, I found that while there are general good/bad numbers it’s also a goat by goat basis because some are resistant (consistently has lower numbers of eggs compared to herd mates which can be due to genetics or a built up immunity of sorts) but there’s also resilient goats (may have consistently moderate or moderately high number of eggs but no negative effects from them). So if you have a resistant goat, that’s awesome. Obviously no treatment needed. Where it gets murky for me is the resilient goats. They may have numbers that by a chart would say to treat but if they are showing no clinical signs along with the count...some say absolutely don’t treat and some say do it just to be safe. I’m still mulling all that info over and will have to cross that bridge when I come to it.

Sorry I rambled. But yes, I too would love a chart for easy reference.
 

·
Registered
Kinder Goat Breeder
Joined
·
4,633 Posts
So there has never been established thresholds for goats. At least that's what my vet told me. So my vet goes off of horse epgs levels as a general guide, but @FizzyGoats is right you have to judge whether a goat needs deworming based on the individual condition.

My vet goes by this:
less than 400 is low
500-700 is moderate
greater than 700 is high

Absolutely do not deworm just because you see eggs. That's a surefire way to create resistance. You need to decide whether to deworm a goat based on multiple factors such as body condition, FAMACHA, and coat condition. That's where the resilience comes into play. If your goat has an EPG of 1500, but has a healthy weight and bright red FAMACHA there is not need to deworm the goat, but let's say you have one with a count of 350 and is loosing weight and has pale pick FAMACHA, that goat should be dewormed..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,004 Posts
Check out this page:


From @NigerianDwarfOwner707 :

This is where you have to look at the whole goat. Normally we say under 500 is a good EPG (eggs per gram). However, you could have a goat with 200 EPG barberpole, and severely anemic, and they still may need deworming. You could also have a goat with 800EPG, no anemia, not underweight, normal poop, etc. and they may not need deworming with a chemical. It's all about looking at everything. But in general, numbers under 500 I like to see, under 200 very ideal. 500-750 is a little concerning, 750-1000 is probably serious, 1000-2000 is pretty heavy. Anything over 2000 is going to be very, very urgent.
https://agreenerworld.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/TAFS-22-Fecal-Egg-Counts-v1.pdf

This is informative, however they missed the "very young goats" section which is usually a limit of 500 EPG.

These numbers only matter if the goat is otherwise healthy - if there is poor FAMACHA and/or poor body condition, you should treat.

View attachment 185141
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
Don't think that's great advice.
There will almost always be some level of parasites for livestock on pasture but I'm told you should never worm animals without looking at other factors, such as physical health.


The worming threshold is dependent on the resilience of your stock.. This article says worm goats who have a barber pole worm FEC of over 2,000 for dry goats and bucks, 1,000 for pregnant and lactating stock and 500 for kids.

ParasiteWorkshop_Proceedings.pdf (tuskegee.edu)
 

·
TKC Farms
Joined
·
2,628 Posts
Don’t know if this will do you any good but it help me when doing fecals. I couldn’t send the pic for some reason. Copy and paste link in your browser.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top