Electric fence installation

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by goathappy, Jun 17, 2008.

  1. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    With electric fencing rule #1 is always have a good ground. Put your grounding rod in moist earth and keep any grass or other vegetation from touching the wires. This will short the fence out and then the fence won't work. For 5 strands, be sure to buy a charger big enough to power the 5 strands. I personally like to buy twice the power for the amount of wire I have, say 5 miles of wire get a 10 mile charger.
     
  2. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Thanks Sarah! I am planning on installing "feed lot" type pasture/pens using electric....they won't be but 100'x 100' so we got a 5 mile fencer and plan on 4-5 strands hot wire with 2 ground rods...hopefully this gets my field "mowed"!
     

  3. Sweet Gum Minis

    Sweet Gum Minis New Member

    Oct 6, 2007
    Easley, SC
    Another good tip for electric fencing is that if you have problems with your goats not getting shocked when you know they should and the fence isn't testing on when you use the fence tester. Try running a ground wire along your fence, not touching the hot wire. Make it a couple inches apart. That will really give them a shock next time they touch it.

    Right now we have a bad drought and due to that our fence is basically not working. We use a ground wire when the hot wire isn't shocking. That makes all the difference.
     
  4. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Thanks Ashley, my hubby had actually been contemplating running a ground along the top of the panels in their "yard" to the first post of the electric fence...we were gonna do that and wondered if it would work. Starting to put my posts in tomorrow since we had to work on cutting the path thru the high grass for the fence line.
     
  5. Sweet Gum Minis

    Sweet Gum Minis New Member

    Oct 6, 2007
    Easley, SC
    Our ground is super dry right now so we need to run a ground wire. Still haven't though. In the buck barn we use a steady stream hot wire. Its actually too strong in my opinion. In the doe pen we use a super mild pulsating wire so that it doesn't hurt any babies. Feels more like a bug irritating you than anything which is enough to keep them off the fence. Bucks however are more persistant.
     
  6. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Well, after I trusted my dear hubby's judgement and got the 60 smooth fiberglass posts and 1/4 mile roll o 17 gauge aluminum wire as well as the 3 bags of round post insulaters and the one bag of t-post insulators....we got the fence 3/4 complete and after 2more trips to TSC we finally had enough to finish the job!! He said that what we started with was enough...no way I was going to short change the area I had wanted fenced! Well after all was done and he had the fencer and ground rod in place there was no juice in the fence! He had gotten a $14.00 fence tester and it showed nothing...I walked the perimeter to make sure that te heavy rains and wind we had on Sunday didn't push anything on the bottom wire and it was clear, so I started checking the insulators on the t- posts, when hubby stretched the wire it caused the wire to slide on to the steel and obviously grounded itself out!! I got that fixed and proceeded to use the fence tester...sorry, I'm not brave enough to touch it on purpose :ROFL: ....I got a weak flicker at 1000v so I was satisfied, my dear hubby wasn't though and HE touched the wires, after the third one he lost his nerve! See, that was $14.00 that I didn't need to spend!


    Anyhow, with 4 strands hot at 4''-5"-5"-6" and I don't have jumpers it seems to be working very well, I tied orange plastic ribbon on the 3rd wire between the posts so it was visible and wouldn't you know it...each goat had to "taste" them and WOW I never saw my old girl jump so high...she got the message as did Tilly, Binky and Angel but little 4 month old Heidi cried and had her little lip curled and ran right through it, she hid under the shed til I chummed her out and put her back in with the others, now that she knows the fence bites I hope she stays in it!

    Now, on to the boys in the near future and I hope they get the message as easy as the girls did! My plan for this is to keep the girls in their yard and let the boys out on the outside of the electric fence so the girls pasture is off limits...this way they get to "inspect" the new electric and know that it hurts if they touch it and when I get theirs up they'll know that those orange flags "bite back" :slapfloor: