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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, one of our does has just given birth, 3 problems, we don't know which one, neither have bagged up :-/ neither want to know the little guy and lastly and most importantly he has turned in feet?? What can we do? Is he being ignored for the deformation by mum? Can we fix it?
 

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Mom should have blood on her backside, and I doubt that she has rejected her kid due to his feet. It looks like he has contracted tendons, and they will correct themselves in a week or so with use. You can splint them, but it will still take a week or so for them to straighten out. Contracted tendons are usually due to a lack of space in the uterus. Not sure what to tell you about the not bagged up part. She either has milk or she doesn't and that is not really negotiable. Stand the baby up and stand over him facing the same direction. Place 2 fingers on either side of his tummy in front of his hipbones. Does his tummy feel full? If so, he has nursed and you can pen him with his mother and just keep an eye on them. If not, get your flashlight and check to see if you can see blood on anyone's backside. If so, you've found the little one's mother. Restrain her and try to milk her to see if she any milk. If so, hold the little guy up to her udder and try to get him to nurse. If she has no milk and the baby has not nursed, you will have to bottle him with colostrum. He has to have colostrum - it is critical!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys, your right about the tendons, we took him to the vet and the suspected mum, he splinted his legs, he milked mum but can't explain why her udder hasn't filled properly, we didn't even know she was pregnant ! She had twins late last year and she was all bloated up and her udder was big and full! This time she didn't show and no real udder growth , thanks for the advice!!!
 

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I have a Saanen who last season didnt get her milk for a few days..scared me..she is one of my best milkers! she had just enough colostrum but was very thick..I had to milk it and add milk to thin it and bottle the kids until her milk came through...but BOY when the milk came in we were milking her full well along with kids on her..it was crazy...hopefully your mom wil at least bring enough down to raise her little man..
I would give mom Selenium Vit E gel and check her need for copper, up her feed some and message her udder a few times a day to encourage the milk to drop an be sure she is drinking enough....I use coconut oil whip smooth, with vit e gel and peppermint ess. oil as an udder balm..
best wishes..

Homemade Electrolytes
A half gallon of hot water
2-6 Tablespoons of Unsulphured Blackstrap Molasses
1-2 Tablespoons of Either Sea Salt, Epsom Salt, Baking Soda or Table Salt.
1 cup of Apple Cider Vinegar


Mix well and drench or let them drink it.
 

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I just went through the same thing with one of my pygmy babies last month. I took him to the vet but was unable to get the bose shots (dummy vet)but the vet did splint his little legs . I took the splints off about every 4-5 days to check his progress and to reapply the vet wrap to make sure it wasn't too tight. It took my little guy about 3 weeks and he was as good as new :)

Plant Dog breed Goat Grass Fawn
 

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Depending on what you're feeding, that can play a huge factor on if momma comes into milk before, during, or days after labor. The farm I manage now actually feeds purposely to have the cows NOT come in milk until roughly 3-7 days postpartum. It gives momma time to adjust to new surroundings, new rations, and concentrate on herself, repairing damages, and working into milk. Their colostrum is typically creamy clear yellow. We seem to have better luck with breeding for next calves, less scarring, and less overall health problems (feet issues, DAs, ketosis, milk fever).

I don't know why this is relevant, but figured someone might like the knowledge. :)
 

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That's interesting! I can see where that would have valuable benefits with a bunch of high producing dairy cows. You manage a dairy, is that right? Since most dairies pull the calves, I'm assuming that is what you do, too, or do the calves continue nursing colostrum until the dam's milk comes in?
 

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That's interesting! I can see where that would have valuable benefits with a bunch of high producing dairy cows. You manage a dairy, is that right? Since most dairies pull the calves, I'm assuming that is what you do, too, or do the calves continue nursing colostrum until the dam's milk comes in?
We actually practice Johne's prevention. We pasteurize the "colostrum" and feed to older calves if mom has tested negative. For heifers, the first 3 feedings they get bagged single use colostrum packets. We do leave the beef cross calves (for >6 breedings), as well as bulls on momma for the first 12 hours. We keep all these for the feedlot. Then they get 3 packets as well. Heifers are pulled and get 3 packets off the bat. Calves are vaccinated as soon as the cord breaks. We have monitors and alarms in the bedding packs. I can take pics of the setup if you'd like to see? :)
 

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Landscape Working animal Dairy cow Rural area Livestock


Dry cow lot. Behind them (the gates) are the breeding age heifers with headlocks.

Vertebrate Fence Grass Landscape Working animal


Dry cows attached to calf pen.

Vertebrate Shade Wood Tints and shades Rectangle


Directly in the middle are the hospital pens, the left is our pen 2, and the right is pen 1.

Vertebrate Mammal Working animal Fence Terrestrial animal


Dry cows to the right, and pen 1.

Mode of transport Interior design Gas Metropolitan area Motor vehicle


Parlor
 

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