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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had repeated cases of enter otoxemia over past few years in kids. I have saved some and lost some, but getting frustrated with how frequently it occurs. What should I be doing differently to prevent. Kids are usually 3 to 10 weeks. Any ideas?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have vaccinated, but didn't seem to help.

They are on their mom's milk, graze, and what's little feed they can get when here is fed grain (grain is gone within 2 minutes). Hay also fed to here once daily.
 

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I have had repeated cases of enter otoxemia over past few years in kids. I have saved some and lost some, but getting frustrated with how frequently it occurs. What should I be doing differently to prevent. Kids are usually 3 to 10 weeks. Any ideas?
Have you had any of them tested for coccidosis? That is about the right age for that to happen cause they are tryin food and maybe a bit of browse and grass for the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
They generally start with bloat symptoms then toxin symptoms of "seizing", head over back stiffening. Does this sound like enter o or cocc?
 

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Could be coccidia at it's most serious. Get some fecals done to include coccidia and see where your farm stands on coccidia levels.
 

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Do they drink directly from their moms or do you bottle feed them mom's milk? That wasn't clear from your post.
 

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What they were doing at the end that’s what mine were doing when they died. Necropsy showed super high levels of cocci which the vet and I were shocked because they were not the classic cocci kids. No scours, not nasty looking with pot bellies and super fat both internally and externally. Basically everything you have ever heard about cocci other then death toss out the door!
Did a kid die recently? I just found out that if a kid dies from enterotoxemia the large intestines are red and look angry. You can also get a scalpel and cut into the small intestines and you can see if it’s cocci or not. I’ll see if I can find a pic to show you what it looks like.
If you don’t have one that recently passed, well I would still go ahead and do a fecal. If that is not possible and your loosing a good amount right now I would just treat them. Lots of breeders (me too) treat every 3 weeks as a prevention. But let me see if I can find those pictures for you
 

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Ok my phone isn’t letting me take screen shots right now for some dumb reason but if you google coccidiosis intestine and look at images you’ll see what to look for
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I vaccinate at around 3weeks. booster 4weeks later. Should I do it earlier?

I am looking into starting preventative coccidia med.
 

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A few years ago, I bought all my CDT vaccines at a well known farm supply store. I had some Tetanus occur, as well as enterotoxemia.
I was baffled. I gave the CDT shots at all the correct intervals, etc. After checking around and lots of research and questions, asked about the practices of the store from a girl I knew that worked at the store.

What I found out was: When the trucks came in on Fri. they did not get unloaded until at least Monday. No problem, except, vaccines and penicillin need refrigerated. That was one of the hottest summers on record here.
All the vaccines I had purchased had been in that truck that 95*F weekend, and the ice packs in the coolers had warmed up. (Gel packs). (Nothing could be proven, no managers would confirm).

I guess what I am saying is, keep your vaccines refrigerated, buy from reputable places, and maybe it isn't your fault, but the handling of the medication by others that is causing your goats' illnesses.

I buy from Jeffers and PBS now.
 
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