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Any thoughts on spacing metal T-poles about 4-5 feet apart and using woven wire between without high tension? Would that work, or is even a 4-5 span with a little slack going to be climb-able? Thoughts? We don't have goats yet and are simply planning.
 

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That is what my pasture fence is, woven wire with t-posts, a strand of electric wire at the top and another strand about their chest height (with the longer yellow extenders).

Problems I've had with it is, snow making it sag and (before I had the electric strands) the goats rubbing on it, causing it to bow out; letting them crawl under it.
 

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If you use field fencing, you need to anchor your corners with a large wooden post, and every few feet after that. The t-posts can be used in between. Some folks opt for cattle panels. Goats do rub on fences and stand on them, so the tighter the better. Investing in fence can add up, so you don't want them destroying what you've put up.
 

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I don't have regular field fence but it seems 4-5ft is extreme. Most are rated for 8ft space and high tensile is 16.
We did cattle panels last year for our first pen. Wasn't too large but plenty big with tons of bushy graze for them to munch. We were utilizing some posts that were already in behind the barn. The posts were around 16 ft apart but didn't always add up so there were spots I had to wire the two ends of the panels together. I thought for sure it wouldn't hold them from all the horror stories I'd heard/read. They never got out of there but they always had food and water etc.. so never felt the need to escape.
This year, we did one of the two acre Pasture/treeline and used the high tensile field fence with the 16 ft posts that were there. So far it's keeping the goats, IPPs, and Shetland pony all safely inside. I think some goats are just more prone to escaping and some are content as long as they get care and daily attention.
When I lived in CT, the farm I worked on had huge Nubians and had a small pen with fence they easily could have jumped but they never got out.
I'd suggest starting with a smaller penned area so you can figure out their personalities and your own management style before dumping a ton on something that might not be right for your place..just my thoughts though.:)
 

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Any thoughts on spacing metal T-poles about 4-5 feet apart and using woven wire between without high tension? Would that work, or is even a 4-5 span with a little slack going to be climb-able? Thoughts? We don't have goats yet and are simply planning.
First, I would say, frame your questions. What breed of goats will you be pasturing? Larger, leggy, goats will be heavier on a fence and more likely to jump than miniature goats, Nigerians, pygmys, and fainters.
I use woven 2"x4" x4ft field fencing with t post spaced 12ft apart and wooden corner posts for pasturing Nigerians. Wire is stretched very tight corner to corner before t posts are added. I don't have sagging problems, but I rarely have ice or snow load in NC to contend with. My fence's best friend is the single strand of electric, at about the goats chest height. It Keeps them from rubbing and standing on the woven, hence, no sags. Plus, any coyote or dog sticking their nose in through the fence, gets a deterant shock. (I have heard the yelps).
 
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