FAMACHA de-worming method

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by DebianDog, Aug 10, 2009.

  1. DebianDog

    DebianDog New Member

    34
    Aug 9, 2009
    When I was at "goat class" this weekend one of the speakers and just finished up a 2 year study where half the herd was regularly dewormed and the others were dewormed using the FAMACHA method.
    [​IMG]

    The good news was that there was a 36% reduction in cost because you are only giving it to goats that need it. The bad news is you're staring into goat eyes. A LOT. He suggested every 2 weeks. He also mentioned if it was continually wet outside you could almost guarantee they were gonna need to be dewormed. Also if you wait till the eyes are about white your goat is probably going to die.
     
  2. ChestnutGrove

    ChestnutGrove New Member

    265
    Apr 29, 2009
    Tennessee
    The Famacha program makes a lot of sence to me and that does make sence that it would be more cost effective. I must say that even though I do use it as a way to keep track of herd health - I like to routinly deworm too and I like the deworming them 3x in 10 days apart.
     

  3. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    It does work....and with continuous warm and wet weather, chances are that the majority will need to be wormed more often. I do a regular worming, cost isn't an issue as I have at the moment 8 mini goats, I do check lids, if they are pale they get wormed, bright pink, they are skipped.
     
  4. DebianDog

    DebianDog New Member

    34
    Aug 9, 2009
    Yes I think all the parasite speakers were pushing this method as to slow down the rate the worms build up a tolerance for a particular de-wormer. De-worming on a schedule just drives the livelihood of future worm generations plus... who's not for saving a few $$$ if the results are the same.
    :clap: Healthy goats!
     
  5. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    Tho not "trained" I do FAMACHA too. But from what I understand there are certain wormloads that do not show up by checking lids. :shrug:
     
  6. Victoria

    Victoria New Member

    461
    Dec 20, 2008
    Vernonia, Oregon
    This is all new to me..ummm, what is FAMACHA??
     
  7. RowdyKidz

    RowdyKidz Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2009
    NW Ohio
    Famacha is a worming system, going by eyelid colors to treat worm loads.

    Did I explain that right? :question: I do the same. Worm as nesscessary.
     
  8. MissMM

    MissMM New Member

    645
    Oct 22, 2007
    McGregor, MN
    Famacha is basically checking the coloration of your goats eyelids and gums. If they are anything other than pink in color, worming might be necessary. A fecal count is always recommended to verify if you need to de-worm and which dewormer to use. Information site:

    http://www.extension.org/pages/FAMACHA(C)_Information_Guide

    I've used parts of this method for over 3 years now and basically only worm my whole herd now in the spring. There are a few goats in my herd that need it more often. Why, when they are all in the same pen and have the same diet, I don't know :scratch:
     
  9. DebianDog

    DebianDog New Member

    34
    Aug 9, 2009

    That is true! With the blood sucking worms you are checking for Anemia (meaning "lack of blood") but with the other types of worms there are other symptoms off the top of my head:
    - head shaking or stargazing for the nasal worms from fly larvae (rare in goats)
    - thread worms include diarrhea with mucous and blood, loss of appetite, and weight loss.
    - tapeworms do not usually affect goats but they may have them

    Also the $5-$10 or so dollars a Vet will charge to sample the feces is money well spent if you are not sure what the problem is. The wife is a vet, so there is her plug :wink:
     
  10. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    We use the FAMACHA method of evaluating our goats (116 last count!) and also do fecals on them ourselves. We have wormers such as ivermectin, safeguard, valbazen, and panacure that don't even work anymore. FAMACHA is a way to make the wormers that you do use be effective longer for you. There are a couple of wormers that we have not used (two that we can't even get in the U.S,) and we hope that the one we are using, Cydectin, will stay effective.
    Learn to use the FAMACHA check and fecal egg counts with a microscope, neither are hard to learn, and you will be ahead of the game when it is time to switch wormers.
    Go to www.scsrpc.com to learn more about worms, FAMACHA, and FECs.
     
  11. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    unfortunatly the cost for fecals is much higher then that from the sounds of things when we discuss it. But yes it is worth it to get fecal done at least twice a year -- I plan to have one run this fall. it costs between 25-40.00 here
     
  12. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    Jeez Louise! You could buy a used microscope and learn to do it yourself for that kinda Samoleans! It really ain't that hard to do! Go to Langston University's web site at www2.luresexteu/goats/index.htm They have an on-line guide that can teach you!
     
  13. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    yes i have my own and I do my own -- :p

    the link doesnt work either :shrug:
     
  14. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    OK, lets try it again!

    www2.luresext.edu/goats/index.htm

    Try that one! Then click on online manual for conducting fecal egg counts in goats.

    Sorry! :doh: I guess I shouldna got so type happy! :type:
     
  15. cdtrum

    cdtrum New Member

    Aug 25, 2008
    Northern Indiana
    Ok....I have a question.......I went through the famacha training and I know how to do it, but my goats are never as red as the chart shows, hey are pink.....but not red.......I have fecals ran at the vets and I do my own, my guys have also been wormed and are very healthy......so can it be that some goats can be just paler in color?......all 4 of mine are the same. I do not believe they are anemic, they are full of energy, eat great, hold their weight. I have them on very good minerals also.
    Thanks, Denise
     
  16. yeah mine are never RED either, just a nice pink color. I dont know if its naturally that color or they just have a constant low-level infestation of worms...
     
  17. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I do have fecals run in the spring....and do check lids periodically. I have 3 does with bright pink lids, 2 bucks with really pink lids, 1 buck and 1 doe with pink lids and 1 doe that has pale lids in the afternoon and bright pink in the evening :?
     
  18. i want to echo what the OP said about pale/white lids. DONT WAIT til they get white, by then its too late. I had two die this year because I didnt treat fast enough :(
     
  19. DebianDog

    DebianDog New Member

    34
    Aug 9, 2009
    If you have a lot of browse, a lot of pasture, or anything that keeps their head out of the low lying foliage they are much less likely to be "wormy". But I do not think it is possible to be totally 100% "worm free" so you may never achieve the perfect red eye :scratch:
     
  20. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    I feel that FAMACHA is just another good tool to help breeders keep their herds at optimal health. As was mentioned don't wait till the lids are really pale, that may be too late. Worm at a 4. Most of my goats are 2s and 3s. When they get worse than that then it is time to worm. If a goat is a constant 3 or 4 then it's time to do a fecal and apply some special care such as vitamin supplements and blackstrap molasses. We are pretty tough around here and cull goats that show persistent worminess. It's just good business for our type of operation.