Farm life: Tips and tricks!

Discussion in 'Crafty Cabin' started by Nigerian dwarf goat, May 11, 2020.

  1. Nigerian dwarf goat

    Nigerian dwarf goat Well-Known Member

    Sep 24, 2017
    Texas
    Mine is the plastic :) make sure to sterilize it then seal it up in a plastic baggie in your kidding kit.

    I had a doe have a difficult delivery, but i just had one of my goat friends help to pull the kids, because i didn't know what i was feeling for, and my vet was and hour away pulling a calf! All of the other vets in my area didn't seem worried that she had been pushing for over 30 minutes!
     
  2. Caileigh Jane Smith

    Caileigh Jane Smith Active Member

    103
    Dec 1, 2019
    Missouri, USA
    These are some great tips! I like to store waste hay and reuse it as bedding or garden mulch. I put it in the old feed sacks and store it til I need it.
     

  3. Aasiya

    Aasiya Well-Known Member

    132
    Apr 29, 2020
    Dhaka, Bangladesh
    "Nigerian dwarf goat, post: 2398197, member: 32957"]Mine is the plastic :) make sure to sterilize it then seal it up in a plastic baggie in your kidding kit.

    I had a doe have a difficult delivery, but i just had one of my goat friends help to pull the kids, because i didn't know what i was feeling for, and my vet was and hour away pulling a calf! All of the other vets in my area didn't seem worried that she had been pushing for over 30 minutes!"

    thanks! should i sterilize it by boiling or dip into bleach or something? i certainly hope i never need it though....but best be prepared

    iv got a little tip of my own....for those of you who live in terribly rainy areas, wood pallet 'tables' are life savers! the goats love them to keep their feet off the soggy ground. you can just stack two uniform bricks under each corner of the pallet or even make legs for them.( my goats are small black bengalXnubian...not sure about the tables for larger breeds)
     
  4. Aasiya

    Aasiya Well-Known Member

    132
    Apr 29, 2020
    Dhaka, Bangladesh
    ok, thanks so much:)
     
  5. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    We used pallets too, to make a boardwalk so they could get from one end of the field to the other. They worked great during the horrible wet season! :)
     
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  6. Aasiya

    Aasiya Well-Known Member

    132
    Apr 29, 2020
    Dhaka, Bangladesh
    yes they do...its great that you used them successfully as well! our shelters are built higher than ground level , but its still a battle with mud during monsoon....pallets are my go-to then: )
     
  7. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    Yep! They are great! Unfortunately, ours didn't last too long as the water began to rot the boards. We have done some repairs and so far everything has been working well. We plan to re-do our entire goat set-up and give them a nice pressured treated boardwalk of some sorts. We just have to make sure they don't chew on it. ;)
     
  8. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    With the hay strings if you know how to crochet (I guess or knit) you can get a huge crochet hook and make mats. I was going to make everyone a welcome mat in my family but never got around to doing it. You can make hanging planters with them, and a friend of mine made some baskets with them. I’m not sure how she went about doing it but they were really neat.
    Feed sacks I basically use as trash bags. When we flooded last year I used them as kinda sand bags. Since my does are super protective over their new born kids I staple feed sacks on the gates to their stalls so they can’t see the other goats walking by. I’ve thought about cutting them and sewing together to make tarps but haven’t done that. I don’t think they would be super water proof but like on my chicken coop where it’s peaked on the roof it would (should) keep the majority of the water out. Oh also when we flooded last year some of my stalls got super super soaked. I laid down about 30 of those feed sacks before I put straw down so the straw didn’t suck it all up right away.
    Pallets make good gates. I’m also planning on lining the boys houses with them since it tends to get wet there and use as beds since I felt bad for them last year and kept them in one of the pastures instead and they worked with each other to get out and knock some of my doeling up :head smash: so no more being nice lol
    Lol I’m trying to think what else I have Jerry rigged out there.
     
  9. Aasiya

    Aasiya Well-Known Member

    132
    Apr 29, 2020
    Dhaka, Bangladesh
    I do that too! Also for the cats, Buttercup cant stand my cats, and if she sees them going.by, she almost smashes the gate down to get at them lol....they also make great temporary fixes for leaky roofs
     
  10. Sfgwife

    Sfgwife Well-Known Member

    Feb 17, 2018
    North Cakalaki
    Baling twine works for EVERYTHING! Zip ties too.
     
  11. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  12. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    If I've learned anything about clipping hooves and bleeding goats...
    ALWAYS keep flour on hand! From my experience, it has been the best blood-stopper and, it doesn't sting. Happy goats. Unhappy flies. Perfect combination. ;)
     
  13. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    Yep! I think flour should be on hand for anyone with animals lol I can’t even tell you how many times I have used it. Spoiled brat of a doeling tried to flip herself off the stand while trimming her feet, took the trimmers to the shoulder, flour to the rescue! Something got ahold of my chicken, flour! One horse kicked the other in the jaw and bloodied her, flour again lol
     
  14. Nigerian dwarf goat

    Nigerian dwarf goat Well-Known Member

    Sep 24, 2017
    Texas
    ^^ Yes! I use cornstarch! I was clipping my does hooves this morning, and she kicked, and her hock got me in the chin and i was bleeding everywhere! LOL! Cornstarch on my chin stopped it lol! But any kind of bleeding wound, i use cornstarch instead of flour! I have used both though!
     
  15. Aasiya

    Aasiya Well-Known Member

    132
    Apr 29, 2020
    Dhaka, Bangladesh
    I use cornstarch too when the Blood-Stop is out!
     
  16. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    I have had to use flour on my dog's nail, my parakeets,
    (Cut a blood feather while clipping a wing :oops:) my cat, my goats, and numerous times on chickens. I wonder which of the two are better, cornstarch or flour? Any thoughts? ;)
     
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  17. Tanya

    Tanya Well-Known Member

    Cornstarch contains ingredients that congile. Flour smothers. Flour puts out a fire very well. Cornstarch burns.
     
  18. Nigerian dwarf goat

    Nigerian dwarf goat Well-Known Member

    Sep 24, 2017
    Texas
    oh, oops. i had no idea! It didnt burn me yesterday lol!