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I think my two goats are fat, 6 month old Nigerian dwarfs. I feed them a large bowl full of alfalfa hay and about 1/2 cup purina goat chow in the morning and at night. Is this a good diet for them? They also eat our grass, some weeds and such around the yard. Thanks!!! I just read a magazine today that said I shouldn't be feeding them grains at all unless they are milking or preggo...so confused!
 

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It is all confusing at first but after you spend some time on here the 'pros' will come to help you. We all were confused at first when we got our goats. We had no idea what goats ate or ... anything at all about the goat dietary needs when we started.

First.. goats are browsers.. most of us goat people have them in fields and have to give them that extra minerals that they would get from eating a mostly all browse diet. So .. they need minerals. We use powder form. They love this.
- Alfalfa hay or pellets are good but only in small amounts.
- a good goat feed or goat alfalfa mix pellet feed designed for goats is a good start as they correct protein balance or at least close to what they need is all figured out.
- sweet feed and grains are not good for goats unless they are pregnant or nursing or in an extreme cold environment to help keep their warmth.
-most important of all is to try to figure out how to treat your goats for worms so you will benefit from typing in a search on this forum for de-worming .This was a big learning time for us and we gained mostly from this forum.
Everything I have written is not to be taken perfectly factually but it is what we have learned works for us. The little ones may require different type needs as we raise Boers but their diet is still... Browse needy.
 

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Oh.. and I have to mention: Our goats are very fat- way too fat right now. They are getting fat off of dry oak acorns which some believe are poisonous. No dead goats here at all from eating that but I do worry that they are too fat.
 

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The persimmons are about to start falling in my area and my pastures are full of persimmon trees, how will this effect my boer herd?
 

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I think the acorn and goat thing come from cattle people. Acorns will cause ulcers if they get hooked on them and eat too much will also cause a horse to get very sick. I was worried my first year with goats but like you no deaths :).
Now to the topic :) I am a big believe that a fat goat is just as bad as a very thin goat. Keep in mind a goat will also get fat on the inside of the ribs as well as the out side. I take it these are pets??? Like what was said above if they don't have a reason for the grain cut it out...that will also help with the food bill :). If right now there are things around your place for them to eat I wouldn't be feeding them hay or if you feel you need to very little at night. What I'm doing right now since there are things for my goats to eat I let them go ahead and brows during the day and since I want them penned at night I con them to come back home with a little grain. If its a very hot day and since their only source of water is at home I'll throw them hay before I let them out. It'll take a bit to figure out what is best for your goats
 

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I think my two goats are fat, 6 month old Nigerian dwarfs. I feed them a large bowl full of alfalfa hay and about 1/2 cup purina goat chow in the morning and at night. Is this a good diet for them? They also eat our grass, some weeds and such around the yard. Thanks!!! I just read a magazine today that said I shouldn't be feeding them grains at all unless they are milking or preggo...so confused!
Here is a guide to help you determine whether they are fat or not.

http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/goats/CSGSymposium/bodycondscore_goat.pdf

Growing goats need some grain to support that growth, the key is to not overfeed and let them get fat - especially doelings, as being fat results in fat deposits in their udders which will impact milking ability further down the road. As long as you are not overfeeding the pellets, I see nothing wrong with how you are feeding your goats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Such helpful information thank you everyone!!! Now to my new question....is purina goat chow considered a grain? Or is this feed which is different than grain? Thanks!!!
 

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Such helpful information thank you everyone!!! Now to my new question....is purina goat chow considered a grain? Or is this feed which is different than grain? Thanks!!!
That used to by my question also as people were calling it a grain. I don't consider that a grain as it is mostly alfalfa. The actual true grain is probably with the crimped corn, wheat and oats that is in the sweet feed. This is truly a very hot feed for horses and goats and has to be used sparingly.

We give the purina goat chow, and supplement with minerals, natural browse when we can, sometimes Boss(black oil sunflower seeds).. I give orange peels, apples and some bits of watermelon rinds sparingly and in a clean way.(-Not thrown out in the dirt)
We give oat hay, and simple orchard or meadow grass hay until later in the winter- we mix a bit of alfalfa hay in for mammas.

If these are just pets and/or wethers they require a simple diet but with minerals to help balance them out. If they won't eat mineral powder it helps to roll the apple pieces in the minerals until they develop a healthy appetite to eat it on their own. Hope it isnt all too confusing. Some call goat feed- grain which confuses me too.
We have given the pregnant goats in the winter time a small bit of 'grain' mixed in their goat feed.
 

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Our little buck does get a bit of alfalfa, goat feed and a small bit of calf manna to help make his bones and muscles grow well as he is just a baby at this time.
 
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